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Elementary - Curricular

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Alpine Skiing/Snowblading/Snowboarding

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

A teacher must be the supervisor in charge of the alpine skiing/snowboarding/snowblading trip/activity.

A volunteer supervisor is an individual who is 18 years of age or older who is approved by the principal and has received instructions on their duties as a supervisor on the alpine skiing/snowblading/snowboarding trip/activity.

OSBIE/OSRA’s School Board/Snow Resort Safety Guidelines for Out-of-School Trips for Winter Sports Education Program is a resource that can assist in planning ski/scnowboard trips.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

When skiing/snowblading or snowboarding at facilities both within and outside of Ontario a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS98, CSA Z263.1) must be worn.

Parents/guardians must be informed:

  • that their child/ward must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards organization (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS98, CSA Z263.1) as appropriate for skiing/snowblading or snowboarding;
  • of the importance of their child/ward wearing wrist guards for snowboarding;
  • that when their child/ward uses their own personal equipment or borrows equipment:
    • of the importance of instructing their child/ward on how to wear their helmet properly;
    • an equipment inspection by a knowledgeable equipment technician must take place prior to the activity to ensure:
      • skis, snowboards and poles are appropriate for the size and ability of the student;
      • all bindings are in working order and set to the proper tension;
      • all bindings meet current guidelines;
      • boots and bindings are thoroughly compatible.

When renting equipment, the facility operator must provide:

  • boards, skis and poles appropriate for the size and ability of the student;
  • boards and skis with edges in good condition;
  • an inspection and adjustment of boots and bindings by a knowledgeable equipment technician on-site;
  • snow sport helmets that are in good condition and are certified by a recognized safety standards organization (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS 98, CSA Z263.1);
  • a check that rental helmets are properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for outdoor activity must be worn (e.g. use layering principles, hats, mitts or gloves).

No long scarves.

Long hair must be tied back or tucked in.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Commercially-operated ski facilities with suitable teaching areas (gentle slopes) must be used.

The area must be patrolled by members of a recognized ski patrol.

The facility provider must define skiing area to the students so they are aware of the boundaries and hazards for the activity.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., anaphylaxis, asthma, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

All students must be tested and grouped appropriately as determined by a qualified skiing/snowblading or snowboarding instructor.

An instructional component is mandatory for all students at all levels of ability.

All skills must be taught in proper progression, based on observed skill levels.

Activities/games must be based on the skills that are taught.

Students must be taught the importance of controlled skiing/snowblading/snowboarding at all times.

Students must ski/snowblade/snowboard in areas identified as appropriate by the qualified instructor.

In order to ski/snowblade/snowboard in more challenging areas of the facility/site, specific instruction must be given (e.g., instruction on the mogul hill, instruction on the half-pipe/terrain park).

Students must be instructed to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Review with the students prior to the trip:

  • Emergency procedures
  • A properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS 98, CSA Z263.1) as appropriate for skiing/snowblading or snowboarding must be worn
  • The importance of wearing wrist guards for snowboarding
  • Possible risks of the activity (e.g., the dangers of impact with obstacles, notably: trees, lift towers, fences and snow-making and –grooming equipment) and the ways to minimize them and participate safely (e.g., watching a safety video such as A Little Respect: ThinkFirst).
  • An instructional component, that includes the proper wearing and use of equipment, is mandatory for all students at all levels of ability.
  • All students must be tested and grouped appropriately as determined by a qualified skiing/snowblading/snowboarding instructor.
  • The importance of:
    • skiing/snowblading and snowboarding only on designated trails commensurate with ability as determined by snow resort teaching staff
    • selecting proper clothing for the activity and weather of the day (e.g., no jeans)
    • taking rest/breaks during the day and not getting overtired
  • Safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing, recognizing and treating frostbite and hypothermia
  • Ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles)
  • Activities that are not permitted including no jumping activities no and inversions (hips must be below head level at all times)
  • The Alpine Responsibility Code
  • Lift use guidelines
  • (Where appropriate) freestyle terrain information

Parents/guardians must be informed of the following:

  • location of activity is off school property
  • means of transportation
  • education program content:
    • assigned groups by ability
    • mandatory lesson
    • designation of trails commensurate with ability as determined by snow resort teaching staff (e.g. progressive sticker procedure, opportunity to upgrade)
  • importance of wearing suitable clothing
  • importance of sun protection
  • The Alpine Responsibility Code
  • (Where appropriate) freestyle terrain information

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite, snow conditions, visibility)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Responsibilities of all supervisors must be clearly outlined, including circulating to all hills/terrains that students are using for skiing/snowblading/snowboarding and in the chalet facility.

All supervisors must:

  • be familiar with applicable elements of this activity page; and
  • be aware of risks of the activity and the ways to minimize them and participate safely (e.g., watching a safety video such as A Little Respect: ThinkFirst.

A process must be in place by which supervisors can contact students (e.g., check-in time).

Supervisor Ratios

  • Grades 1-3: 1 supervisor per 4 students
  • Grades 1-3 Chair Supervision: 1 adult on every chair
  • Grades 4-6: 1 supervisor per 10 students
  • Grades 7-8: 1 supervisor per 12 students

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Archery

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

All of the equipment must be inspected on a regular basis and repaired as necessary.

Arm guards and finger tabs must be made available to students.

Bow length and weight must correspond to the height and strength of the participant.

Compound bows must not exceed 30 lb. pull weight.

An equal number of appropriate- sized/length arrows must be given to each participant.

Appropriate targets.

Target butts must be:

  • a minimum of 5cm (2’’) thick of 0.9kg (2lb) density ethafoam pieces, or equivalent
  • 1.2m x 1.2m (4’ x 4’) in size target face

Compound bows are acceptable when target butts are able to stop compound shot arrows.

Where compound bows are used, targets must meet the following requirements:

  • 30-35cm (12-14‘’) deep bin/box of rags, plastic bags, stretch wrap, window screening, etc., which is inside the box and packed tightly
  • 5cm (2’’) density of 0.9kg (2lb) ethafoam or equivalent on the front
  • 80-120cm (31”-47‘’) target faces

Where possible, store ethafoam target butts out of direct sunlight.

No crossbows.

Quivers must be used (e.g., pylon used as a floor quiver).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Exposed jewelry is not permitted.

Appropriate clothing must be worn.

No loose fitting clothing on the upper body.

Suitable footwear must be worn (e.g., running shoes, hiking boots).

Sandals are not permitted.

Long hair must be tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Playing areas must be free of obstructions and hazards.

For indoor shooting, a properly installed safety net must be used.

Access/exit to the facility must be controlled and warning sign posted.

For outdoor activity, the shooting area must be well marked and controlled.

If an outdoor facility does not have a safety net or controlled natural safety barrier (e.g., hill), then an overshoot area must be established, well marked and controlled.

Archery equipment must be stored in two separate secured areas; arrows in one area, bows in another.

Shooting distance must be a minimum of 6m (20’), maximum of 10m (33’).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of athletes whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Establish a “Start” and “Stop” shooting and retrieving system.

Establish an emergency procedure, including whistle system.

Students must receive instruction on:

  • safety and emergency procedures
  • whistle system
  • shooting techniques
  • care and use of equipment
  • how to remove an arrow from a target butt safely

“Shooting” line must be established, appropriate for the skill level of the students.

Sufficient spacing must be provided for each student on the shooting line.

No one in front of shooting line.

All students not involved in shooting must be positioned well behind the shooting line and away from the archers on the line.

Students must be instructed that a loaded bow must never be pointed at anyone.

Bows must only be loaded on the shooting line, after the signal to shoot has been given.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

If outdoors, students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision.

Shooting Ratio: 8 students on the shooting line to 1 teacher/supervisor.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with archery (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Badminton/Speed Badminton

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully-stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for breakage and to determine proper grip.

Protective eye gear meeting ASTM F803 standards or equivalent must be worn by all students (singles and doubles) at all times.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Hanging jewellery is not permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

The court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

If the facility does not allow for safe play (boundary lines too close to walls) modify the rules appropriately.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may effect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression. Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/skills must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

The code of etiquette for court play must be taught and enforced, (e.g., not entering a court being used).

When teaching/practising skills, adequate spacing must be allowed for each athlete to be able to make an uninterrupted swing.

Players must stop play whenever a foreign object comes onto the court.

Encourage front court player to avoid facing partner during a rally.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required during initial instruction.

In-the-area supervision is required after initial instruction.

Setting up of equipment requires on-site supervision.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Ball Hockey/Cosom Hockey

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Elementary Curricular Floor Hockey page

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Stick blades must be checked regularly to determine the blade is securely and safety attached to the stick.

Only use regulation plastic ball hockey, cosom hockey sticks or a wooden hockey shaft with plastic blade.

Goalies must wear a protective mask (e.g., properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and a properly worn hockey helmet with cage or softball mask).

Goalies must wear gloves appropriate to activity (e.g., ball glove).

Use “soft” ball, (e.g., P30, P40, foam ball, yarn ball, plastic or soft rubber puck).

The stick blade must be checked for cracks.

The stick length must be appropriate for the height of the student.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Exposed jewellery is not permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The playing surface must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

Floor plugs must be in place.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of athletes whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games and activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Only active players on the floor can have a stick.

The following rules must be in place and enforced by penalties:

  • No body contact
  • No stick-on-body contact or stick on-stick contact
  • No slapshots
  • Implement a crease for protection of the goalie and no other player, or player’s stick is allowed in the crease.

Stick must remain below waist at all times.

Penalties for stick infractions strictly enforced.

Goalies must remain in crease area during play.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Baseball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Baseball is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Hardball

Basketball/Bordenball/Endball/Benchball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Determine that there is enough space around the benches for safe movement.

The benches must not have cracks, chipped corners or splinters on the top surface.

The benches must be stable and bench tops must be secured to all supports.

the benches must not be near walls or apparatus.

Before playing benchball remind the students of the need to be careful when standing on the benches, especially when trying to catch the ball. Be sure to limit the number of goalies on each bench to 6 students - subsequent goalies stand on the floor at either end of the bench.

Portable basketball systems must be internally weighted to prevent tipping or movement.

A trained adult must set up and move the portable basketball systems.

The height of an adjustable basket must not present a safety concern.

Protective Padding:

In situations where the student’s follow-through could result in contact with a wall and/or stage, protective gym mats or padding must be placed beyond the “key” area and must extend a minimum of 1.8m (6’) up the wall from the top of the baseboard (maximum 10 cm (4”) from the floor) and be a minimum width of 4.8m (16’). Protective mats or padding must have a minimum thickness of 5cm (2"), e.g.:

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Where a stage is close to the baseline, gym mats must be placed over edge of stage and extend close to the floor.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Exposed jewellery is not permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The playing surfaces and surrounding areas must be free of all obstacles.

The playing surface, whether indoor or outdoor, must provide safe footing and traction.

Protective padding must be used on rectangular backboard lower edges and corners.

If playing outdoor, holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

The winch for moving the backboards up and down must not be located directly under the supporting wall-mounted structure.

When raising or lowering baskets, the trained adult operating the hand or motorized winch must be able to see that the area under the basket is clear.

Floor sockets must have cover plates.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games and activities must be based on skills that are taught.

If facility does not allow for safe cross-court play (e.g., doors and radiators under baskets, wall close to the baseline, or side baskets attached to walls), modify rules appropriately (e.g., no lay-ups).

Activity/rules must be modified to the skills of the participants.

No hanging from rims on portable basketball systems.

Dunking is not permitted.

The base for portable basketball systems must not be on the court.

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Only trained adults are to use motorized hand winches to raise or lower baskets.

Trained students under constant supervision may use hand winches.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Blanket Toss

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

This activity is appropriate for grades 5-8 only.

Cultural Context:

The traditional purpose of the Inuit Blanket Toss was to send a community member (a scout) high enough up into the air in order to be able to look out over the Arctic landscape and spot animals (e.g., walrus, whales, caribou, seal) for the community to hunt. The blanket toss has now become a part of events such as the Arctic Games.

The Inuit Blanket Toss sends the scout quite high into the air. This is accomplished by having the scout stand in the middle of the blanket to begin. Those around the blanket hold it between waist and shoulder height, pulled taut. When the scout in the middle is ready, those around the outside of the blanket pull it out, even tighter and in unison, causing the scout to lift into the air off of the blanket. Once tossed, the scout remains upright in the air, and returns to the blanket in a standing position.

The intent for this activity at a school level is to give students a sense of the process and to experience a traditional skill. For safety reasons, the scout will be in a sitting position and tossed no higher than head height of the participating students.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

The equipment must be appropriate for the size, weight, and age and for the skill and ability level of the students.

The Inuit blanket must be commercially made for this purpose.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Exposed hanging jewellery is not permitted.

Scarves must be tucked in or removed.

Tie back long hair.

Facilities

The activity must be conducted outdoors over ground cover that will cushion/absorb a potential fall (e.g. deep snow or wood chips).

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use. The activity area must be free of obstacles and hazards (e.g., ice, deep holes, branches or sticks) and provide safe footing and traction.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Methods to minimize the risk must be communicated to, and demonstrated for students.

Students must be provided with a demonstration of the blanket toss prior to beginning the activity.

Prior to conducting the activity, establish rules and procedures (e.g., commands, progression of steps).

Establish the commands to be used when beginning a toss, and for letting the student gently to the ground after landing (e.g., “Toss on three. Ready? One, two, three!”, “Gently lower the student.”).

Skills must be taught in proper progression:

  1. Practice athletic stance (knees bent, back straight, feet staggered) for the toss and catch while tightening and releasing the blanket. The objective of this stance is to be able to absorb the weight of the person on the blanket as they land.
  2. Practice tossing an item to master the athletic stance and commands to be used before allowing a student on the blanket (e.g., backpack, medicine ball, sand bag, or similar item)
  3. Practice keeping the blanket in the proper position when the item lands after the toss. Students must demonstrate the ability to keep the item in the middle from getting too close to the ground upon landing.
  4. The activity must not proceed from a practice item to a real person until the instructor is satisfied the group is prepared for the appropriate actions, commands, and safety procedures.
  5. Begin with a lighter person so the students can adjust to the proper manoeuvres with the weight of a person.

Include appropriate warm-up and cool down exercises.

When being tossed, the student on the blanket must sit with legs crossed or in front of them. Students may not stand to be tossed. No somersaults or inversions.

The student on the blanket is to be tossed no higher than the head height level of those doing the tossing.

There must be a sufficient number of participants around the outside of the blanket to support the weight of the person on the blanket.

Space students evenly around the perimeter of the blanket.

Students must be able to select a level of challenge that matches their comfort level.

Students may choose to opt out of the blanket toss, to remain around the outside of the circle to help conduct the toss, act as a spotter, or to sit on the blanket and be lifted, but not be tossed.

Only one student may be on the blanket at a time. Instructors may decide on how many tosses each student gets depending on the time available and energy level of the group.

Teachers must explain the importance of trust and maintaining focus on the person in the middle. If students’ focus on rules and procedures deteriorates, the activity must cease.

Blanket must be lowered to the ground for each student to climb on. Students around the perimeter then raise the blanket, lifting with their legs to protect their backs. Those around the perimeter of the blanket must pull it tight when they lift each person to ensure the person in the middle is lifted off the ground and will not hit the ground when they land.

The teacher must check in with the group between each toss to ensure everyone is still feeling strong and comfortable. If anyone is experiencing any pain (back, hands, knees), they must be given the option to stand out.

Give appropriate feedback in order to improve the skills and safety of the group. Re-emphasize rules as appropriate. Draw attention to good tosses, and correct unsafe behaviours.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • Environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV rays)
  • Accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • Previous training and fitness level
  • Length of time and intensity of physical activity.

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g., appropriate clothing, footwear, protection from cold).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Bowling/Lawn Bowling/Bocce Ball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Proper shoes must be worn at all times, as provided or approved by the facility.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Public bowling alleys, lawn bowling facility and fields where school facilities are used, surface must provide safe footing and traction.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Parents must be aware of any off-campus activity and the mode of transportation being used.

Follow rules and etiquette as outlined by the facility.

Non-active participants must be behind bowler(s) at all times and not in field of play.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

If outdoors, students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Broomball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Ice and Non-Ice

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Commercially made brooms for school use, regulation broomball brooms or corn brooms must be used.

The broom length must be appropriate for the size and age of the student. Check the broom shaft for cracks/splinters.

Broomball nets, hockey nets or pylons for goals must be used.

Broomball - Non-Ice:

  • Only foam or utility balls (6” or 15cm in diameter) may be used for non-ice broomball.
  • Goalies must wear a protective mask (e.g., properly fitted as per manufacturer's guidelines) and a properly worn hockey helmet with a cage or a softball mask.

Broomball - Ice:

  • Foam ball, utility ball or regulation broomball ball may be used.
  • Goalies must wear:
    • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn CSA-approved hockey helmet with full cage;
    • gloves (e.g., broomball, hockey);
    • shin pads (e.g., broomball, hockey); and
    • elbow pads.
  • Players must wear:
    • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with a full cage; and
    • gloves (e.g., broomball, hockey)

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Broomball played on fields, blacktop or on rinks requires player to wear suitable clothing for weather conditions.

For broomball on ice, footwear must provide good traction (e.g., broomball shoes).

Skates are not permitted.

Exposed jewellery is not permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Broomball - Ice

The ice surface must be free from obstacles.

Before playing broomball on an outdoor ice surface (e.g., lake, pond) contact the local authorities to determine with absolute certainty, that the ice is thick enough to be safe for the activity.

Broomball - Non-Ice

Indoor and outdoor surfaces must provide safe footing and traction.

The activity area must be free of obstructions and hazards (e.g., tetherball poles, tennis standards, or basketball standards).

The outdoor activity area must be free from ice patches.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of athletes whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents must be informed when activity takes students off school property, and means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Activity/Rules must be modified to age and ability level of students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games and activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Safety Rules of Play

Brooms must remain below the waist at all times.

No intentional contact (i.e. body on body (e.g. body check); broom on body (e.g. cross checking, slashing); broom on broom (e.g. slashing)).

Penalties for infractions must be strictly enforced.

Implement a crease 2m (6’6”) from the goal line. No other players or their brooms are allowed in the crease.

Goalie must remain in the crease during play.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frostbite and hypothermia.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Aerial Parks

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This page applies to aerial parks that have ziplines, and are therefore regulated by TSSA, or aerial parks that do not have ziplines (not regulated by TSSA) but do use a continuous lanyard system.

Portable installation, or a permanent installation on a commercial site.

Grades 1-8, where accommodated by the activity provider.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Required minimum age, height, and weight may vary between and within aerial parks. Please contact your activity provider for clarification.

Also consult Climbing – General Procedures and Climbing - Ziplines.

Equipment

All of the equipment must be inspected by qualified on site aerial park personnel prior to the activity to determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

All of the equipment must meet the current ACCT (Association for Challenge Course Technology) standards or equivalent.

Helmets that are commercially and specifically manufactured for climbing must be properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn by all students who are leaving the ground or are under any activity in use.

Climbing harnesses (sit, sit/chest, or full body) appropriate to the age and/or body size of the climber must be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No open-toed shoes, (e.g., sandals).

No loose clothing (e.g. scarves).

No sharp objects are to be worn or carried in pockets.

No tops with drawstrings.

No exposed jewellery.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

All aerial park elements must meet the ACCT Standards, or equivalent, that are in place at the time of installation.

All of the aerial park elements must be inspected by qualified on-site personnel prior to use to determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

All of the aerial park elements must have been installed, or have passed an annual professional inspection by a qualified aerial park inspector. This annual inspection must be documented in a written report in accordance with the ACCT Standards, or equivalent. Necessary maintenance/ changes to the elements noted in the report must be addressed.

The aerial park must be managed and operated in accordance with the most current ACCT Standards, or equivalent, including having a designated aerial park manager who is responsible for overseeing the staffing and operations of the aerial park.

The aerial park must be used in accordance with the original equipment manufacturers` (OEM) recommendations.

On aerial park elements installed in trees, all dead limbs and any live branches that might be considered hazardous must be removed.

Treed courses must be inspected annually by a professional arborist and all recommendations must be performed.

The activity provider must have a written Policies and Procedures Manual for the management and operation of all aerial park activities. This manual must include an Emergency Action Plan consistent with the most current ACCT Standards or equivalent.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs.

Where the activity takes students off-campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures/emergency action plans.

Students must be made aware of expectations as they relate to:

  • behaviour (e.g. park rules)
  • emergency procedures
  • signal to assemble
  • boundaries for activities
  • proper use of equipment

A method of rescuing a tired/stuck climber must be available (e.g., ladder, scaffold, top-rope belay).

Aerial park activities that are selected must be appropriate for ability levels, age and size of the students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

Fall Protection Operating Systems

Programs may be offered utilizing Individual Lanyard Systems or Continuous Lanyard Systems.

Individual Lanyard System: a system where the student is directly connected to the anchored safety cable via a pair of lanyards. There are two types of control systems:

  • Human control system: is used to manage continuous connection to the life safety system
  • Mechanical control system: is used to manage continuous connection to the life safety system (e.g. SmartBelay, Clic-it, Bornack)

Continuous Lanyard System: a system where the student is connected to the anchored safety cable continuously.

The following applies to ALL fall protection operating systems:

  • Programs are required to follow the ratios related to the Grade Level and fall protection operating system as indicated in the Supervision Section.
  • A qualified instructor must check the harness and connection to the fall protection operating system for any student prior to him/her leaving the ground.
  • The fall protection operating system utilized must be one that was installed and recommended by a qualified aerial parks professional.

Individual Lanyard Systems

Students must participate in a ground school which prepares them for the course.

Students must be supervised at all transitions between elements and each transfer of lanyards, unless using a mechanical control system

Continuous Lanyard Systems

Students must participate in a ground school which prepares them for the course.

Students must be directly supervised at all transfer points

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Repellent must not come into contact with rope.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g. lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision by both a teacher and qualified instructors, as per supervision ratios, who must be present for all aspects of the program.

Constant visual supervision must occur during ground school.

A qualified instructor must check the harness and connection to the fall protection operating system for any student prior to him/her leaving the ground.

Students must be directly supervised at all transitions between elements and each transfer of lanyards, unless using a mechanical control system.

Supervision Ratios

After ground school, for aerial parks that include ziplines and are regulated by TSSA, supervision ratios will be in accordance to the TSSA-stipulated zone guiding requirements for each individual activity provider.

After ground school, for aerial parks that use a continuous lanyard system, the following supervision ratio applies:

  • 1 instructor/guide per 10 actively participating students

Qualifications Applicable to All Installations

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Aerial Parks. A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be at least 18 years of age or older to teach ground school and/or be an instructor.

Individuals who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified instructor.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Ascending Lines

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Portable Installation on School Site, Permanent Installation on School Site, Permanent Installation on Commercial Site

Grade 4 to 8 ONLY where students ascend and descend single lines suspended from anchors.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

All of the equipment must be commercially and specifically manufactured for the intended climbing related activity and adhere to one or more of: UIAA, CE, NFPA, ULC, CSA, ASTM standards.

If a belay device is used, the belay rope must be compatible with the chosen belay device and the climbing activity.

Helmets that are commercially and specifically manufactured for climbing must be properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn by all students who are leaving the ground.

Climbing harnesses, sit or full body must be appropriate for the age and/or body size of the climber must be used.

Mats (e.g., Velcro utility mats, wrestling mats) must be in place at the ascending and descending points for all indoor walls.

Mat thicknesses:

  • cross-link foam 5 cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5 cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5 cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5 cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by the manufacturer.

The top anchors must be able to sustain a load of 22kN/2200kg/4945lbs.

Any carabiners used must be the locking type.

All of the equipment must be inspected by qualified personnel prior to the activity.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No tops with drawstrings.

No exposed jewellery.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The climbing area must be appropriate for the ability levels, age and size of the students.

All providers must follow the Ontario Building Code Act, and all applicable By-Laws and Regulations.

All of the climbing equipment must be installed by a qualified professional (e.g. instructor/provider). The initial installation of climbing equipment must be inspected by qualified personnel upon completion of the installation and at least once a year thereafter by qualified climbing inspection personnel. This inspection must be documented with a written report. Necessary changes noted in the report must be addressed.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/ guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Where the activity takes students off- campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures.

An ascending system and technique recognized by the professional climbing industry must be used (e.g., jumar, a prussic knot).

A qualified instructor must do a safety check of any student leaving the ground.

All participants must be attached to 2 independent ascending devices with a separate locking carabiner for each, unless a conventional top-rope system is used in conjunction.

A method of rescuing a tired/stuck climber must be available (e.g., ladder, scaffold, top-rope belay).

Programs may choose to utilize the following fall protection operating systems as a back up:

  • Climb Only: in such cases, only the instructor belays students.
  • Full Belay: in such cases, students belay other students using a top rope belay.
  • Participatory/Team Belay: in such cases, students participate in a belay team with an instructor belaying other students using a top rope style belay.
  • Auto Belay: mechanical fall protection system where student is connected to a self-retracting lanyard that controls their descent.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

An introductory lesson must be an integral part of the program for all students.

The lesson must:

  • be identified as specific to the ascending lines being used
  • be identified as specific to the ascending device used
  • include instruction and repeat practice of:
    • correct use of harness
    • correct use of knots and tie-in points
    • concept of ascending
    • proper use of ascending device
    • general ascending principles
    • lowering/descending procedures

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision by both a teacher and qualified instructor(s) who must be present for all aspects of the program.

Supervision Ratios Applicable to All Installations

Introductory lesson: 1 instructor per 6 students

After introductory lesson: Grades 4 to 8 – 1 instructor per 12 students

Qualifications Applicable to All Installations

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Ascending Lines.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be at least 18 years of age or older to teach the introductory lesson and/or be an instructor.

Qualifications Applicable to Permanent School Sites

Instructors for permanent school sites must hold a current certificate (within the last 3 years), demonstrating successful completion of a training workshop that directly addresses the climbing activities they are teaching.

Students who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified teacher instructor.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Bouldering/Traverse Climbing Wall

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Portable Installation on School Site, Permanent Installation on School Site, Permanent Installation on Commercial Site

Bouldering Walls: Students combine vertical and horizontal movement on relatively low, artificial climbing walls, un-roped, protected by thick matting, which may include large overhangs and caves. In situations where the falling climber may injure a spotter (e.g., the wall angle is steep and/or the climber is high), a spotter must not be used.

Traverse Walls: Students move mainly horizontally rather than vertically on relatively low, mainly flat, artificial climbing walls, un-roped, protected by matting, and may be assisted by spotters.

Outdoor bouldering on natural rock is not permissible.

Also consult Climbing – General Procedures.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully-stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

All of the equipment must be inspected by qualified personnel prior to the activity.

Mats

Bouldering Mats: A mat surface (solid or cross-linked foam or equivalent) must be in place under the bouldering area. The mats must extend a minimum of 6 feet (approx. 1.83 m.) from the outward most point from the wall (minimum mat thickness is 6”). Where the height increases and/or angle of the wall (e.g., overhangs or caves) increases, the thickness of matting must also increase accordingly (e.g., 12”-24”).

Traverse Wall Mats: A mat surface (solid or cross-linked foam or equivalent) must be in place under the traverse area. If spotters are not used, the mats must extend a minimum of 6 feet (approx. 1.83 m.) from the outward most point from the wall.

Mat thicknesses:

  • cross-link foam 5 cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5 cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5 cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5 cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by the manufacturer.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Medic alert identification and religious articles of faith that cannot be removed must be taped or securely covered.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The climbing area must be appropriate for the ability levels, age and size of the students.

All providers must follow the Ontario Building Code Act, and all applicable By-Laws and Regulations.

All of the walls must be installed by a qualified professional (e.g., instructor/provider). The initial installation of a bouldering or traverse wall must be inspected by qualified personnel upon completion of the installation and at least once a year thereafter by qualified climbing inspection personnel. This inspection must be documented with a written report. Necessary changes noted in the report must be addressed.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Where the activity takes students off-campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Prior to bouldering/traverse climbing, students must be aware of safety procedures.

An introductory lesson must be an integral part of the program for all students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

Instructors must ensure that the landing zone under climbers is free of people and objects.

When dismounting the wall, students must attempt to climb down from the wall rather than jumping or falling.

Grades 6 and below: the hands of the students must not be more than 2.4m (8’) above the ground.

Grades 7 and 8: the hands of the students must not be more than 3.5m (11’6”) above the ground.

In order to minimize the risk of injury to both climbers and spotters, activity provider must consider use of down-climb holds; instruction on proper falling technique and conscientious route planning; and seamless floor padding.

Traverse Wall Spotting

Prior to the activity, instructor must determine whether a spotter is to be used.

During initial instruction, a spotter may be used. The spotter’s role is that of breaking or interrupting the fall of a climber, moving with the climber as he/she progresses; it is not to fully absorb the fall of a climber. A student may fulfill the role of the spotter, provided instruction has been given.

Bouldering Spotting

Prior to the activity, instructor must determine whether a spotter is to be used.

Prior to the use of spotters, instruction must be provided to spotters on proper technique.

In bouldering situations where a falling climber may injure a spotter (e.g., the wall angle is steep [i.e. the climber is in a non-vertical position] and/or the climber is high [i.e. climber’s feet are more than 90cm/3 feet off the ground]), a spotter must not be used.

Students must not walk under anyone bouldering.

Outdoor Bouldering/Traverse Climbing

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision by teacher/instructor during initial skills.

On site supervision after skills have been taught.

A teacher must be present for all aspects of the program.

Students who have demonstrated the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified teacher instructor.

Supervision Ratios

Bouldering:

  • Grade 6 and below: 1 supervisor per 8 students
  • Grade 7 and 8: 1 supervisor per 12 students

Traverse Walls:

  • Grade 6 and below – 1:8 (not including spotters)
  • Grades 7 and 8 – 1:12 (not including spotters)

Outside Provider Instructor Qualifications

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for bouldering/traverse climbing.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be 18 years of age or older to teach the introductory lesson and/or be an instructor.

After initial instruction, an individual (e.g., teacher) who is trained in the skills and safety elements of bouldering/traverse wall climbing can supervise students who are bouldering/traverse wall climbing.

Qualifications Applicable to Permanent School Traverse Walls

Teachers must have attended and successfully completed training on the safe use of the elements of the school site’s traverse wall by a climbing professional (e.g., climbing companies).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Challenge Course - Low Elements

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Portable or Permanent Installation at a commercial or school/board site

Where students perform a series of activities either while working with others on initiative tasks or responding to personal challenges close to the ground.

A low element course is one in which the only fall protection is spotting.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Also consult Climbing – General Procedures

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

All of the equipment must be inspected by qualified on site ropes/challenge course personnel prior to the activity to determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the chosen activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No tops with drawstrings.

No exposed jewellery.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

All of the challenge course low elements must have been originally installed according to the current edition of the ACCT Standards.

A qualified Challenge Course Inspector must inspect all of the challenge course low elements annually. This inspection must use the most current edition of the ACCT Standards and be documented in a written report.

Recommended maintenance to the challenge course low elements noted in the report must be appropriately addressed.

There must be an adequate layer of wood chips at the base of any trees which support low challenge course elements to limit soil compaction.

If indoors, the floor surface under the ropes must be covered with Velcro mats:

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5cm (2”)

The mats must be checked regularly for wear and tear.

Trained on-site personnel must inspect all of the challenge course low elements prior to use.

Both the spotting path and the landing zone for all of the challenge course low elements must be cleared of debris and other obstacles prior to use.

Special Rules/Instructions

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures.

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, cast, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Where the activity takes students off campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs (e.g., behavioural, language).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents with a signed response form from the parent, giving permission for student to participate.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Students must be able to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on the skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

An emergency action plan must be in place and familiar to staff.

Students must be made aware of expectations as they relate to:

  • behaviour
  • emergency procedures
  • signal to assemble
  • boundaries for activities

The low element challenge course must operate in accordance with the most current ACCT Standards.

A qualified, designate Course Manager who is responsible for overseeing the staffing and operation is required.

The low element challenge course must establish and follow local operating procedures (LOPS) for all elements.

The LOPS must incorporate any recommendations made by the qualified Challenge Course Professional.

When students are spotting, an introductory lesson that incorporates the following items must precede the activity:

  • the instruction to step down rather than fall off elements
  • the responsibility for another student’s safety
  • instruction and repeated practice on:
    • concept of spotting
    • general principles for spotting such as stance and hand position
    • communication and the climber/spotter contract
  • specific instructions for the particular challenge course element

When students have not been taught to spot or are not able to spot effectively, spotting must be performed by one or more trained instructors.

Instructors must address the effect of size differences between a potential low rope participant and his or her spotters when assessing the suitability of using student spotters.

If low ropes course is outdoors, the school board’s lightning protocol must be shared with the operator/activity provider.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Repellent must not come into contact with rope.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision by both a teacher and qualified instructor(s) who must be present for all aspects of the program.

Supervision Ratios for Initial Instruction

  • Grades 1-3: 1 instructor per 8 students
  • Grades 4-8: 1 instructor per 12 students

Qualifications Applicable to All Installations and Sites

All lead low element challenge course instructors must complete an annual training course taught by a qualified challenge course Trainer OR be currently certified in ACCT Standards as a challenge Course Practitioner (Level 1 or 2).

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Challenge Courses – Low Elements.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized Challenge Course Professionals.

This training must be directly applicable to the course/elements at the site. This training must be documented.

Each activity that requires spotting needs the direct supervision of a trained instructor.

Student must be trained in spotting skills and strategies prior to filling the role of a spotter.

Instructors must rotate spotters so that no one becomes physically or mentally fatigued.

All instructors must be at least 18 years of age or older to teach the introductory lesson and/or be an instructor.

Individuals who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified instructor.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Challenge Courses/Towers - High Elements

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Permanent Installation on a School or Commercial Site

An element that requires the use of a belay in normal operation.

Grades 4 to 8: climbing and belaying are permitted.

Grades 1, 2, 3: are to participate on low elements only. A low element course is one in which no rope belay system is required as fall protection is present for the climber. For most low element courses, spotting is needed. Also consult Challenge Courses – Low Elements page.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Also consult the Climbing – General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

All of the equipment must be inspected by qualified on site ropes/challenge course personnel prior to the activity to determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

All of the equipment must meet the current ACCT (Association for Challenge Course Technology) standards.

Helmets that are commercially and specifically manufactured for climbing must be properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn by all students who are leaving the ground or are under any activity in use.

Belay devices must be connected with a locking carabiner rated at 22kN/2200kg/4945lbs, where commercial friction or camming devices are used.

The climbing ropes must be compatible with the chosen belay device and the climbing activity.

The climbing harnesses (sit, sit/chest, or full body) must be appropriate to the age and/or body size of the climbers.

For all indoor challenge courses, mats (e.g., Velcro utility mats, wrestling mats) must be in place at the ascending and descending points.

Mat thicknesses:

  • cross-link foam 5 cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5 cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5 cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5 cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by the manufacturer

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No open-toed shoes, (e.g., sandals).

No loose clothing.

No sharp objects are to be worn or carried in pockets.

No tops with drawstrings.

No exposed jewellery.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

All of the challenge course elements must be inspected by qualified on-site personnel prior to use to determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

All of the challenge course elements must have been installed, or have passed an annual professional inspection by a Qualified Challenge Course Professional as defined in the most current edition of The Association for Challenge Course Technology (ACCT), Challenge Course Standards or equivalent.

All of the challenge course elements must meet the ACCT Standards that are in place at the time of installation.

All of the challenge course elements must be inspected annually by a Qualified Challenge Course Professional, using the most recent edition of the ACCT Standards. This inspection must be documented in a written report in accordance with the ACCT Standards. Necessary maintenance/changes to the elements noted in the report must be addressed.

The challenge course must be managed and operated in accordance with the most current ACCT Standards, including having a designated Challenge Course Manager who is responsible for overseeing the staffing and operations of the challenge course.

The challenge course must be used in accordance with the current Challenge Course Professional’s recommendations.

Courses installed in trees must be inspected annually by a professional challenge course vendor.

Dead limbs and any live branches that might be considered hazardous must be removed.

Courses built in trees must have an adequate thickness of wood chips at the base of all elements.

Treed courses must be inspected annually by a professional challenge course vendor and dead limbs removed.

Treed courses must not be used in high winds or thunderstorms.

Special Rules/Instructions

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures/emergency action plans.

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs.

Where the activity takes students off-campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Students must be made aware of expectations as they relate to:

  • behaviour
  • emergency procedures
  • signal to assemble
  • boundaries for activities

The site must have a written Policies and Procedures Manual for the management and operation of all challenge course activities. This manual must include an Emergency Action Plan consistent with the most current ACCT Challenge Course Standards.

A method of rescuing a tired/stuck climber must be available (e.g., ladder, scaffold, top-rope belay).

Challenge course activities that are selected must be appropriate for ability levels, age and size of the students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

Students waiting at the top of rappel towers must be outfitted in proper fall protection or a barrier must be put in place.

Fall Protection Operating Systems

Programs may be offered utilizing the following fall protection operating systems:

Climb Only: in such cases, only the instructor belays students.

Full Belay: in such cases, students belay other students using a top rope belay.

Participatory/Team Belay: in such cases, students participate in a belay team with an instructor belaying other students using a top rope style belay.

Auto Belay: mechanical fall protection system where student is connected to a self-retracting lanyard that controls their descent.

Individual Lanyard System: a system where the student is directly connected to the belay cable via a pair of lanyards. There are two types of control systems:

  • Human control system: is used to manage continuous connection to the life safety system
  • Mechanical control system: is used to manage continuous connection to the life safety system (e.g. SmartBelay, Clic-it, Bornack)

The following applies to ALL fall protection operating systems:

  • Programs are required to follow the ratios related to the Grade Level and fall protection operating system as indicated in the Supervision section.
  • A qualified instructor must check the harness and connection to the fall protection operating system for any student prior to him/her leaving the ground.
  • The fall protection operating system utilized must be one that was installed and recommended by a qualified Challenge Course Professional.
  • The climber-to-belayer weight ratio must be taken into consideration when determining the number of buddy belayers necessary in any non-ground anchored system. In most conventional top-roped belay systems, an approximate climber-to-belayer weight ratio is 1:1.

Full Belay

When students are belaying, an introductory lesson incorporating the following elements must precede top-roped climbing:

  • must be identified as challenge course specific
  • must be identified as specific to the belay system/device being used
  • must include instruction and repeat practice on:
  • correct use of harness
  • correct use of knots and tie-in points
  • concept of top-roping
  • correct use of belay device/system
  • general principles for belaying with the specific system
  • lowering procedures with the specific system
  • communication and the climber/belayer contract

When students are belaying, a system/technique must be employed that will not allow the climber to ground-fall in the event that the belayer becomes incapacitated must be incorporated.

Constant visual supervision must occur.

Participatory Belay/Team Belay

Students may participate as part of a Participatory/Team Belay when:

  • a locking assisted braking device is used AND an Instructor lowers the climber, OR
  • an instructor’s hands are on the brake rope at all times
  • constant visual supervision must occur

Individual Lanyard Systems

Students must participate in a ground school which prepares them for the course.

Students must be directly supervised at all transitions between elements and each transfer of lanyards, unless using a mechanical control system.

Students must not use lanyards for fall arrest (i.e. transferring anchor points while climbing vertically).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Repellent must not come into contact with rope.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g. lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision by both a teacher and two qualified instructors who must be present for all aspects of the program. If the teacher is a qualified instructor, then another teacher and qualified instructor are required.

Constant visual supervision must occur when students are on the challenge course.

A qualified instructor must check the harness and connection to the fall protection operating system for any student prior to him/her leaving the ground.

Supervision Ratios

After the introductory lesson, the following ratios must be maintained:

Climb only:

  • Grades 4-5: 1 instructor per 1 active line
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 1 active line

Full Belay:

  • Grades 4-5: Not permitted
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 1 active line

Participatory/Team Belay:

  • Grades 4-5: 1 instructor per 2 active lines
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 2 active lines

Auto Belay:

  • Grades 4-5: 1 instructor per 4 actively participating students in close proximity
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 6 actively participating students in close proximity

Individual Lanyard Human:

  • Grades 4-5: Not permitted
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 6 actively participating students

Individual Lanyard Mechanical:

  • Grades 4-5: 1 instructor per 4 actively participating students
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 6 actively participating students

Qualifications Applicable to All Installations

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Challenge Courses/Towers - High Elements.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized Challenge Course Professionals.

All instructors must be at least 18 years of age or older to teach the introductory lesson and/or be an instructor.

Individuals who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified instructor.

Qualifications Applicable to Permanent Installations on School Sites

Instructors for permanent school sites must hold a current certificate (within the last 3 years), demonstrating successful completion of a training workshop that directly addresses the climbing activities they are teaching (e.g., Toronto District School Board Guidelines and Standards for Indoor Climbing in-service program).

Qualifications Applicable to Permanent Installations at a Commercial Site

All instructors must hold a current certificate demonstrating successful completion of training from an accredited, recognized, challenge course professional training company.

The site must have a Challenge Course Manager. The role of the Challenge Course Manager is to make and implement the necessary decisions about programming and risk management. The Challenge Course Manager must either have a Challenge Course Manager Certificate or have knowledge and skills equivalent to the course content (i.e. knowledge/training relating to staff training and supervision, program administration, development of policies and procedures, risk management, maintenance and inspection, ANSI-ACCT standards and other relevant standards).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Climbing Wall and Related Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Portable Installation on School Site, Permanent Installation on School Site, Permanent Installation on Commercial Site

Climb only and belaying conditions for grades 1 to 8 when wall climbing.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

All of the equipment must be commercially and specifically manufactured for the intended climbing related activity and adhere to one of: UIAA, CE, NFPA, ULC, CSA, ASTM standards.

The belay rope must be compatible with the chosen belay device and the climbing activity.

Helmets that are commercially and specifically manufactured for climbing must be properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn by all of the students who are leaving the ground.

The climbers must use climbing harnesses (sit or full body) appropriate for their age and/or body size.

Belay devices must be connected with a locking carabiner rated at 22kN/2200kg/ 4945lbs., where commercial friction or camming devices are used.

Mats (e.g., Velcro utility mats, wrestling mats) must be in place at the ascending and descending points for all of the indoor walls.

Mat thicknesses:

  • cross-link foam 5 cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5 cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5 cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5 cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by the manufacturer.

The top anchors must have 2 individual points or belay bar.

The top anchors must have locking devices. The climbers must not be able to climb above the anchors. The top anchors must be able to sustain a load of 22kN/2200kg/4945lbs.

The bottom anchors must be one of: 2 individual floor anchors, or belayer harness, (a belay system/technique that will not allow the climber to ground- fall in the event the belayer becomes incapacitated) or combination harness and floor.

The bottom anchors must have a belay device connected with a locking carabiner and be capable of sustaining a load of 10kN/1000kg/2240lbs.

All equipment must be inspected by qualified personnel prior to activity.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No tops with drawstrings.

No exposed jewellery.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The climbing wall must be appropriate for the ability levels, age and size of the students.

All of the providers must follow the Ontario Building Code Act, and all applicable By-Laws and Regulations.

All of the climbing equipment must be installed by a qualified professional (e.g., instructor/ provider). The initial installation of the climbing equipment must be inspected by qualified personnel upon completion of the installation, and at least once a year thereafter by qualified climbing inspection personnel. This inspection must be documented with a written report. Necessary changes noted in the report must be addressed.

Special Rules/Instructions

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures.

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g. asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/ guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off- campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity, and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring, must be communicated to the students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

A belay system suitable to the age, maturity, size and skill of the students must be used.

When students are belaying, the following elements must be addressed in an introductory lesson prior to top-rope climbing:

  • the introductory lesson be identified as top-rope specific
  • the introductory lesson must be identified as specific to the belay device being used
  • the introductory lesson must include instruction on and repeat practice of:
    • correct use of harness
    • correct use of knots and tie-in points
    • concept of top-roping
    • correct use of belay device
    • general belaying principles
    • lowering procedures
    • communication and the climber/belayer contract

A qualified instructor (see supervision section for definition of “qualified”) must do a safety check of any student leaving the ground.

Fall Protection Operating Systems

Programs may be offered utilizing the following fall protection operating systems:

  • Climb Only: in such cases, only the instructor belays students.
  • Full Belay: in such cases, students belay other students using a top rope belay.
  • Participatory/Team Belay: in such cases, students participate in a belay team with an instructor belaying other students using a top rope style belay.
  • Auto Belay: mechanical fall protection system where student is connected to a self-retracting lanyard that controls their descent.

The following applies to ALL fall protection operating systems:

Programs are required to follow the ratios related to the grade level and the fall protection operating systems as indicated in the Supervision Section.

A qualified instructor must check the harness and connection to the fall protection operating system for any student prior to him/her leaving the ground.

The fall protection operating system utilized must be one that was installed and recommended by a qualified Challenge Course Professional.

The climber-to-belayer weight ratio must be taken into consideration when determining the number of buddy belayers necessary in any non-ground anchored system. In most conventional top-roped belay systems, an approximate climber-to-belayer weight ratio is 1:1.

A body belay is not to be used.

A belay system/technique that will not allow the climber to ground-fall in the event that the belayer becomes incapacitated must be used by student belayers.

Ground/floor anchors must be backed up by a harness attachment unless they have been specifically installed for climbing and conform to recognized standards (see equipment list).

Students in grade 6 and below are not allowed to belay.

Lead climbing by students must not be done.

For Climb Only Programs

Rules must clearly be explained to students prior to climbing by a qualified instructor.

Students are not permitted to:

  • belay
  • apply harnesses to themselves or others
  • tie knots for themselves or others
  • connect to an auto belay system themselves

Belaying, applying harnesses, tying knots, and connecting to an auto belay must be done by a qualified instructor.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision by both a teacher and qualified instructor(s) who must be present for all aspects of the program.

Supervision Ratios Applicable to All Installations

Climb only:

  • Grades 1-3: 1 instructor per 1 active line
  • Grades 4-6: 1 instructor per 1 active line
  • Grades 7-8: 1 instructor per 1 active line

Full Belay:

  • Grades 1-3: Not permitted
  • Grades 4-6: Not permitted
  • Grades 7-8: 1 instructor per 2 active lines

Participatory/Team Belay:

  • Grades 1-3: Not permitted
  • Grades 4-6: 1 instructor per 4 active lines
  • Grades 7-8: 1 instructor per 4 active lines

Auto Belay:

  • Grades 1-3: 1 instructor per 4 actively participating students in close proximity
  • Grades 4-5: 1 instructor per 6 actively participating students in close proximity
  • Grades 6-8: 1 instructor per 8 actively participating students in close proximity

After introductory lesson, above ratios must be maintained.

Intramural Wall Climbing Clubs Ratios

For Grades 7 and 8 intramural Clubs (e.g., Wall Climbing Clubs) that go to a commercial site provider, all of the above ratios apply for the first three visits (total time 6 hours minimum) that take place within a reasonable time frame. After three separate visits (total time 6 hours minimum):

  • an instructor provides a belay check for each student
  • a climbing professional provides on-site supervision
  • 1 instructor to 12 students

Qualifications Applicable to All Installations

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Climbing Walls.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be at least 18 years of age or older to teach the introductory lesson and/or be an instructor.

Qualifications Applicable to Permanent School Sites

Instructors for permanent school sites must hold a current certificate (within the last 3 years), demonstrating successful completion of a training workshop that directly addresses the climbing activities they are teaching.

Students who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified teacher instructor.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - General Procedures

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Special Rules/Instructions

Prior to using a climbing activity provider for either on-site or off-site activities the following must take place:

  • Teacher must address school board policies
  • Activity provider must provide evidence of knowledge, expertise, certification (where applicable) in activity to be provided.

When students are participating in more than one activity, teachers/supervisors must refer to the activity page for each activity.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to minimize the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

Teachers, prior to first lesson, must inform climbing instructor of students who have special needs (e.g., behavioural management) or medical conditions that may influence full participation (e.g., seizure disorder).

For outdoor climbing facilities, teachers/supervisors must monitor weather conditions and postpone or modify the excursion to enhance safety of all individuals.

Follow Board procedures for lightning.

If activities are outdoors, the school board’s lightning protocol must be shared with the operator/activity provider.

All off-site climbing activities:

  • Follow all school board off-site excursion procedures
  • Parents/guardians must be informed of the risks involved with the activities.

Climbing Activity Descriptions

Aerial Parks: A supervised independent aerial experience where students travel from platform to platform while connected to a safety line. May include elements such as: tarzan ropes, suspension bridges, cargo net, ladders, climbing walls, ziplines, mechanically-operated descent. Required minimum age, height, and weight may vary between aerial parks. Please contact your aerial park provider for clarification. (Portable installation, or a permanent installation on a commercial site.)

Ascending Lines: Where students climb or ascend and descend single lines suspended from anchors. (portable installation on school site, or permanent installation on school or commercial site). Grades 4 to 8 only.

Bouldering: Where students climb relatively low walls, un-roped, protected by matting.(portable installation on school site, or permanent installation on school or commercial site)

Challenge Course/Towers – High Elements: An element that requires the use of a belay in normal operation. (permanent installation on a school or commercial site). Grades 1, 2, 3 – low elements only (consult the Low Elements page). Grades 4-8 climbing and belaying permitted.

Challenge Course - Low Elements: Where students perform a series of activities, either while working with others on initiative tasks or responding to personal challenges close to the ground. No rope belay system is required for fall protection and where spotting is needed. (portable or permanent at commercial or school/board site)

Climbing Wall and Related Activities: For wall climbing programs where a belay is required. (portable installation on school site, permanent installation on school or commercial site).

Outdoor Rock Climbing: Climbing the side of a rock face. (This is NOT outdoor ascending lines, ziplines or bouldering.) Grades 6 to 8 only.

Traverse Climbing Wall: Students move mainly horizontally rather than vertically on relatively low, mainly flat, artificial climbing walls, un-roped, protected by matting, and may be assisted by spotters. (portable installation on school site, or permanent installation on school or commercial site)

Zipline, Tyrolean Traverse: Where students move in a horizontal or descending manner along a fixed rope/line, installed in an elevated fashion (portable installation on school site, permanent installation on commercial site). Grades 1 to 8 where accommodated by the activity provider. Required minimum age, height, and weight may vary between ziplines. Please contact your activity provider for clarification.

Fall Protection Operating System Definitions

Climb Only: in such cases, only the instructor belays students.

Full Belay: in such cases, students belay other students using a top rope belay.

Participatory/Team Belay: in such cases, students participate in a belay team with an instructor belaying other students using a top rope style belay.

Auto Belay: mechanical fall protection system where student is connected to a self-retracting lanyard that controls their descent.

Continuous Lanyard System: a system where the student is connected to the anchored safety cable continuously.

Individual Lanyard System: a system where the student is directly connected to the belay cable via a pair of lanyards. There are two types of control systems:

  • Human control system: is used to manage continuous connection to the life safety system
  • Mechanical control system: is used to manage continuous connection to the life safety system (e.g. SmartBelay, Clic-it, Bornack)

Primary Fall Protection Operating Systems by Climbing Activity

(Not all operating systems are appropriate for all grade levels. Consult individual activity pages for specific information.)

For climb only:

  • Ascending Lines
  • Challenge Course – Towers/High Elements
  • Climbing Wall
  • Outdoor Rock Climbing
  • Zipline

For full belay:

  • Ascending Lines
  • Challenge Course – Towers/High Elements
  • Climbing Wall
  • Outdoor Rock Climbing
  • Zipline

For participatory/team belay:

  • Ascending Lines
  • Challenge Course – Towers/High Elements
  • Climbing Wall
  • Zipline

For auto belay:

  • Aerial Parks
  • Ascending Lines
  • Challenge Course – Towers/High Elements
  • Climbing Wall
  • Zipline

For individual lanyard human:

  • Aerial Parks
  • Challenge Course – Towers/High Elements
  • Zipline

For individual lanyard mechanical:

  • Aerial Parks
  • Challenge Course – Towers/High Elements
  • Zipline

For continuous lanyard system:

  • Aerial Parks

For mats:

  • Bouldering/Traverse Wall Climbing

For spotting:

  • Bouldering/Traverse Wall Climbing
  • Challenge Course – Low Elements

Supervision

Type of supervision: Refer to the activity page for each climbing activity.

Ratios: Refer to specific climbing activity pages for instructor to student ratios. Where multiple activities are taking place at the climbing site, ratios for each specific activity must follow the specific activity page requirements.

Qualifications Applicable to All Installations

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for their respective activity.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be 18 years of age or older to teach ground school and/or be an instructor.

Qualifications Applicable to Permanent School Sites

Instructors for permanent school sites must hold a current certificate (within the last 3 years), demonstrating successful completion of a training workshop that directly addresses the climbing activities they are teaching.

Students who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified teacher instructor.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Ice Climbing

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Climbing - Ice Climbing is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Climbing - Outdoor Rock Climbing

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Climbing the side of a rock face where students may belay.

This does not include outdoor ascending lines, ziplines or bouldering.

Grades 6-8 only.

Also consult Climbing – General Procedures.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

All of the equipment must be inspected prior to activity by qualified personnel to determine that it is safe for use.

All of the equipment must be commercially and specifically manufactured for the intended climbing related activity and adhere to one of: UIAA, CE, NFPA, ULC, CSA, ASTM standards.

The climbing ropes must be compatible with the chosen belay device and the climbing activity.

The helmets that are commercially and specifically manufactured for climbing must be properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn by everyone at the climbing site.

The climbers must use a climbing harnesses (sit or full body) appropriate for their age and/or body size.

Belay devices must be connected with a locking carabiner rated at 22kN/2200kg/ 4945lbs., where commercial friction or camming devices are used.

The top anchors must:

  • have a minimum of 2 independent points
  • have locking devices
  • be able to sustain a load of 22kN/2200kg/4945lbs.

The climbers must not be able to climb above the anchors.

A bottom anchor must consist of a ground anchor in combination with a belayer harness.

The bottom anchors must have a belay device connected with a locking carabiner and the anchoring system must be capable of sustaining a load of 10kN/1000kg/2240lbs.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No tops with drawstrings.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all of the rock climbing sites are established sites.

Climbing at sites where:

  • land owner has given permission for instruction in climbing, and,
  • recognition for rock climbing is provided by a reputable source (e.g., Rock Climbing Guidebook, instructor in the rock climbing community).

Where the surrounding outdoor activity area may present a hazard (e.g., rock falls, poison ivy), information and instruction on how to minimize the risk of injury from occurring must be communicated to students.

Special Rules/Instructions

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures.

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs (e.g., behavioural, language).

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Water replacement and nutritional needs of climbers must be addressed.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Climbing must be appropriate for ability levels, age and size of students.

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

When students are belaying, the following elements must be addressed in an introductory lesson prior to top-rope climbing:

  • the introductory lesson be identified as top rope specific;
  • the introductory lesson must be identified as specific to the belay device being used;
  • the introductory lesson must include instruction on and repeat practice of:
    • correct use of harness
    • correct use of knots and tie-in points
    • concept of top-roping
    • correct use of belay device
    • general belaying principles
    • lowering procedures
    • communication and the climber/belayer contract
    • procedures to minimize the hazards of falling rock

Students waiting to climb must be positioned:

  • a safe distance away from the base of the climb or,
  • be tied off if within 3m (10’) of the top edge of the cliff

A recognized descent route must be used to reach the base of the cliff.

A qualified instructor must do a safety check of any student leaving the ground.

A buddy belay (when students are belaying) must be incorporated into all belay systems at all times. In most conventional top-roped belay systems an approximate climber to belayer weight ratio is 1:1 when there is no ground anchor.

Climber/belayer weight ratio must be taken into consideration when determining the number of buddy belayers necessary in any non-ground anchored system.

A body belay and a counter-balanced system (e.g., Australian Belay) are not to be used.

A belay system/technique that will not allow the climber to ground-fall in the event that the belayer becomes incapacitated must be used by student belayers.

Lead climbing by students must not be done.

For Climb Only Programs

Prior to climbing, rules must clearly be explained to students by a qualified instructor.

Students are not permitted to belay, and unless directly supervised by instructor, students are not permitted to:

  • apply harnesses to themselves or others
  • tie knots for themselves or others

Environmental Considerations

Weather conditions must not present a safety issue.

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Note: insect repellent must be used on body only, not hands. Repellent must not come into contact with rope.

The school board must provide their lightning policy to the operator/provider.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision by both a teacher and qualified instructor(s) who must be present for all aspects of the activity.

If the teacher is providing rock climbing instruction, an additional teacher/supervisor must be provided.

Constant visual supervision must be provided when students are climbing.

A safety check of each student leaving the ground must be done by an instructor in all initial and subsequent climbing sessions.

Supervision Ratios

For initial instruction - 1 climbing instructor per 1 active line.

After initial instruction and when subsequent sessions are within a reasonable time frame: 1 climbing instructor per 2 active lines.

The overall climbing ratio must not exceed 1 instructor per 6 students.

For Climb Only Programs: 1 instructor per belay activity.

Instructor Qualifications

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Outdoor Rock Climbing.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be 18 years of age or older to teach the introductory lesson and/or be an instructor.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Climbing - Zipline/Tyrolean Traverse/Equivalent

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Permanent or Portable Installation

Where students move in a horizontal or descending manner along a fixed rope/line, installed in an elevated fashion.

Grades 1 to 8 where accommodated by the activity provider.

Required minimum age, height, and weight may vary between ziplines. Please contact your activity provider for clarification.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully-stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

All of the equipment must be inspected prior to activity by qualified personnel to determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

All of the equipment must be commercially and specifically manufactured for the intended climbing related activity and adhere to one of: UIAA, CE, NFPA, ULC, CSA, ASTM standards.

The ropes/lines must be compatible with the chosen climbing activity.

Helmets that are commercially and specifically manufactured for climbing must be properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn by all students who are leaving the ground.

The climbers must use climbing harnesses (sit or full body) appropriate for their age and/or body size.

There must be 2 single pulleys or a double sheave pulley.

The top anchors must have 2 individual points, locking devices and must be able to sustain a load of 22kN/2200kg/4500lbs.

For Tyrolean Travers

The base of the scaffolding must be completely covered with landing mats that are a minimum of 50cm (20”) thick, OR an additional instructor is positioned at the top of the scaffolding and mats (e.g., Velcro utility mats, wrestling mats) must be in placed at the descending points.

Mat thicknesses:

  • cross-link foam 5 cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5 cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5 cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5 cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by the manufacturer

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Clothing and footwear appropriate to the activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Long hair must be covered or tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The climbing must be appropriate for the ability levels, age and size of the students.

All providers must follow:

All of the climbing equipment must be installed by a qualified professional (e.g., instructor/provider). The initial installation of the climbing equipment must be inspected by qualified personnel upon completion of the installation and at least once a year thereafter by qualified climbing inspection personnel. This inspection must be documented with a written report. Necessary changes noted in the report must be addressed.

Special Rules/Instructions

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures.

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Where the activity takes students off-campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to the first lesson, teachers must inform climbing instructors of students who have special needs.

Teachers, instructors and students must be aware of safety procedures.

Risks involved with each activity and how to lower the risk of an injury from occurring must be communicated to the students.

Students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity prior to participating. Students must not participate in the activity until this instruction has been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

A system and technique recognized by the professional climbing industry must be used.

A system must be used that will not allow participant to make contact with the ground while in transit along the installed rope/line.

An arresting system must be incorporated into the zip/traverse line to prevent contact with the bottom anchors.

Activity and course elements that are introduced must be based on skills that are taught and appropriate for the developmental stage and experience of the students.

Students must have prior instruction and experience in belaying.

An introductory lesson must be an integral part of the program for all students.

The introductory lesson must:

  • be specific to the site
  • be identified as specific to the system used
  • include instruction and repeat practice of:
    • correct use of harness
    • correct use of pulley(s), equipment, and attachment points
    • safe method of ascending to the elevated system
    • safe method of descending from the elevated system
    • safe method of transferring between the elevated system and the fail arrest system

Students must be allowed to select a challenge at their comfort level, including the choice to not participate.

Teachers, instructors and supervisors must be aware of the possibility of peer pressure and make sure no student is coerced into participating.

A qualified instructor must do a safety check of any student leaving the ground.

While ascending to a scaffold take-over platform, student must be on a belay.

A buddy belay (when students are belaying) must be incorporated into all belay systems at all times.

Climber/belayer weight ratio must be taken into consideration when determining the number of buddy belayers necessary in any non-ground anchored system.

A body belay is not to be used.

A belay system/technique that will not allow the climber to ground-fall in the event that the belayer becomes incapacitated must be used by student belayers.

All participants must be attached to the zip/traverse line with 2 locking carabiners.

A method of rescuing a tired/stuck climber must be available (e.g., ladder, scaffold, top-rope belay).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Where the surrounding outdoor activity may present a hazard (e.g., rock falls, poison ivy), information and instruction on how to minimize the risk of injury from occurring must be communicated to students.

Supervision

On site supervision by both a teacher and qualified instructor(s) who must be present for all aspects of the program with the exception of when the students are active on the zipline/traverse.

Constant Visual Supervision must be provided by the instructor(s) for each active ziplines/traverse

A qualified instructor must supervise the transfer of the carabiners from the top rope to the zip/traverse line.

Supervision Ratios

For ziplines: after ground school, supervision ratios will be in accordance to the TSSA-stipulated guiding requirements for each individual activity provider.

For Tyrolean Traverse: 1 instructor for each active traverse line

Instructor Qualifications

Instructors must be trained in, understand, demonstrate, and adhere to a directly relevant skill set for Zipline/Tyrolean Traverse.

A relevant skill set is a described set of skills developed by recognized climbing professionals.

All instructors must be 18 years of age or older to teach the ground school and/or be an instructor.

Individuals who have been trained and can demonstrate the required instructor skills and who are 16 years of age or older can assist with instruction but must be directly supervised by a qualified instructor.

First Aid

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Cooperative Games

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Dodgeball or Relay/Tag Games pages.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use (e.g. hoops are not broken or bent).

The equipment must appropriate for the size, weight, age, skill and ability level of the students.

All the balls must be properly inflated.

No homemade equipment can be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn.

Appropriate running shoes that are securely fastened.

No exposed jewellery.

Tie back long hair.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

The activity area must be free of hazards (e.g., equipment in corners and on sidelines).

The floor surface must provide safe footing and traction.

Non-gym indoor facilities (e.g., foyer, classroom, hall, concourse, etc.) must enable students to move freely (consult Appendix G - Safety in Activity Rooms).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Students must be taught skills in proper progression (e.g., stepping into a hoop on the floor before being asked to run in and out of hoops).

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities must be age appropriate.

Students must be instructed in how to move safely in personal and general space.

Establish rules for the distribution and return of equipment.

Include appropriate warm-ups and cool downs.

Emphasize with students what cooperation looks like and sounds like.

Walls and stages cannot be used as turning points and end zones. A marker (e.g., line or pylon) must be designated away from the wall and properly identified.

Establish rules and procedures in the gym before going outdoors (e.g., stop/start signals).

Running and relays

Students must not be blindfolded.

No running backwards.

Participants in a relay must have their own lane.

Be aware of increased risk with tying legs together.

Games that include tagging

Clearly define areas of the body that can be tagged (e.g. arms, back, legs)

Instruct students that a tag is a touch, not a push, punch or grab

Where blockers are permitted, they are not to intentionally make contact with the tagger with their bodies, arms or legs, but rather to move in front of the tagger

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Students must never be in equipment room unsupervised.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Cricket/Cricket Variations

Elementary - Curricular 2017

(e.g., Kanga Cricket/Cricket Wicket/Continuous Cricket)

The official game of cricket is not an appropriate activity at the Elementary Curricular level.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Official Kanga Ball set or equipment modifications, for example:

  • cosom plastic balls or soft balls
  • paddle bats
  • pylons for wicket

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Studded cricket shoes must not be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Outdoor fields must be free from debris and obstructions and provide safe footing and traction.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For indoor games, the playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., table, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

A student’s fitness level must be commensurate with the level of competition.

Bouncers and bean balls must not be bowled.

A designated area must be established for non-active players at a safe distance behind the batter.

The bowler standing behind a designated line must underhand lob or roll the ball (primary/junior) at the batter’s wicket.

Straight-arm overhand throws could be used at the intermediate level.

The wicket keeper must stand a safe distance behind a striker.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Cross Country Running/Orienteering

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

No bare feet.

No spikes/cleats of any kind.

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Running Off School Site

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

If the cross-country route or orienteering course is on grass and/or in a wooded area, the teachers/instructors must do a safety check “walk through” after a substantial rainfall and/or windstorm, in order to identify potential hazards.

Before the initial use, teachers must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).

If route is off school property, determine that the students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of athletes whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents must be notified when students will be running off the school property and where applicable, the means of transportation to get to the site.

Parents and students must be informed of the importance of using sun protection and insect repellent.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Length and difficulty of route must be appropriate to the age and ability level of the participants (e.g., primary students must not be out of sight for long periods of time).

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Students must be instructed in basic road safety.

Students are to run in pairs or groups (e.g., use the buddy system)

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects, frostbite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

In-the-area supervision.

Off-Site Orienteering Ratios

Grades 1-3: 1 supervisor per 10 students

Grades 4-8: 1 supervisor per 20 students

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Cross Country Skiing/Snowshoeing

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

A teacher must be the supervisor in charge of the cross country skiing/snowshoeing trip/activity.

A volunteer supervisor is an individual who is 18 years of age or older who is approved by the principal and has received instructions on their duties as a supervisor on the cross country skiing/snowshoeing trip/activity.

OSBIE/OSRA’s School Board/Snow Resort Safety Guidelines for Out-of-School Trips for Winter Sports Education Program is a resource that can assist in planning cross country skiing trips.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

The equipment must be in good repair and appropriate for the size of the skier/snowshoer.

Parents/guardians must be informed that when their child/ward uses their own personal equipment or borrows equipment:

  • of the importance of an annual equipment inspection prior to the activity to ensure:
    • skis and poles are appropriate for the size and ability of the student;
    • all bindings are in working order and set to the proper tension;
    • all bindings meet current approved guidelines; and
    • boots and bindings are compatible.

When equipment is provided by the school/board or rented from a commercial facility, the following must be provided:

  • skis and poles appropriate for the size and ability of the student;
  • skis with edges in good condition;
  • boots and bindings that are compatible.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for outdoor activity must be worn (e.g. use layering principles, hats, mitts or gloves).

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Prior to the initial use of the trail, the teacher(s) must do a safety check “ski through” in order to identify potential hazards which must be brought to the attention of the students.

When choosing a site, the sun, wind, snow conditions and the suitability of the terrain for the students age and ability must be taken into consideration.

When selecting a non-commercial site, the facility must include all of the following:

  • a level practice/teaching area
  • a long run-out at the bottom section of a larger hill
  • proximity to warmth, food, waxing and other facilities
  • well-marked trails

Where applicable, the facility provider must define specific routes to the students so they are aware of the boundaries and hazards for activity.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Teach basic uphill and downhill manoeuvres on gentle slopes.

Activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Instruct students to check that boots are secure in bindings.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Parent/Guardians must be informed of the following:

  • location of activity is off school property
  • means of transportation
  • details of the activity
  • importance of wearing suitable clothing for activity and weather of the day
  • importance of sun protection
  • Cross Country Responsibility Code

Please consult “Parent/Guardian must be informed” in the Equipment section.

Review with students prior to the trip:

  • Cross Country Responsibility Code
  • Possible risks of the activity (e.g., the dangers of impact with obstacles, notably: trees, fences) and the ways to minimize them and participate safely.
  • Emergency procedures
  • The importance of:
    • selecting proper clothing for the activity and weather of the day (e.g., no jeans)
    • taking rest/breaks during the day and not getting overtired
  • Ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing)
  • Safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frost bite and hypothermia
  • An instructional component, that includes the proper wearing and use of equipment, is mandatory for all for students at all levels of ability
  • Safety precautions related to the use of sharp tip poles when in close proximity to other students

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather [including snow conditions and visibility], UV index, frostbite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Supervision

On-site supervision when skills are being taught.

In-the-area supervision thereafter.

A system must be in place to keep track of students (e.g., buddy system).

All supervisors must be familiar with applicable elements of this activity page and be aware of risks of the activity and the ways to minimize them and participate safely

A process must be in place by which supervisors can contact students (e.g., check-in time).

Responsibilities of all supervisors must be clearly outlined.

Supervision Ratios

The following supervision ratios must be in place for day cross-country trips and snowshoeing trips off school sites:

  • Grades 1-3: 1 supervisor per 6 students
  • Grades 4-6: 1 supervisor per 12 students
  • Grades 7-8: 1 supervisor per 15 students

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Curling

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

Rocks made under the supervision of school staff must not present a safety concern.

The equipment rules mandated by the curling club must be followed.

The teachers must communicate to the students and parent/guardians the importance of wearing a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for a cold temperature activity must be worn.

Curling shoes with a removable gripper on sliding shoe, or shoes with a removable slider, or the sliding shoe must be taped.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities (i.e. curling rink, outdoor rink) are safe to use.

Before curling on an outdoor surface (e.g., lake, pond), contact the local authorities for information to determine with absolute certainty that the ice is thick enough to be safe.

The curling surface must be free of obstacles and hazardous cracks.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Teach etiquette and safety rules before going to the curling rink.

All curlers must observe the rules of etiquette.

Off ice instruction, including safety rules, must precede on-ice instruction.

Students must be instructed not to step over the curling rocks, but to walk around them.

Students must be instructed that unless in the action of shooting, curling rocks should never be picked up off the ice.

Establish a safe routine to clear rocks from the house.

Parents must be informed when curling takes students off school property, and the means of transportation used.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frost bite and hypothermia.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Cycling

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Cycling takes place on paved surfaces (e.g., sidewalks, bike paths, roads).

If cycling also includes off-road, consult the Mountain Biking activity page as well.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe to use.

The following statements refer to student owned, borrowed or rented bicycles:

  • the equipment must conform to local bylaws
  • the students must inspect the bikes for working brakes and properly inflated tires
  • the bicycle size must be appropriate for the rider

A properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn bicycle helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g., CSA, CSPC, Snell, ASTM, BSI, AS) must be worn.

Supervisor must carry:

  • a bicycle tool kit;
  • a pump;
  • a signaling device (e.g., whistle); and
  • a first aid kit.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Clothing must not encumber proper use of bicycle chain.

Clothing must be adequate for outdoor activity.

No open-toed shoes or sandals.

Facilities

Determine that all of the facilities are safe to use.

Choose the routes carefully and consider the road surface, length, steepness of slopes, frequency of traffic, complexity of intersections and railway crossings.

Prior to the initial use of the route, the teacher/supervisor must do a safety ride-through to verify the safety and suitability.

Provide the students with a map and/or clear directions.

Special Rules/Instructions

Parents must be informed that cycling will take students off school property.

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

The rules of the Highway Traffic Act and local bylaws must be reviewed and followed. This includes group riding protocol.

Excursions must be planned for daylight hours.

Instruction must be given on the proper position of a bicycle helmet, i.e., brim of helmet is at eyebrow level.

Students must demonstrate to the teacher/supervisor competency in stopping, changing gears, turning, signaling and passing before leaving school property.

Emphasis must be placed on controlled riding.

A record of students and the route must be left in the school with an appropriate person.

Use any appropriate grouping system, e.g., the buddy system.

For grades 1, 2 and 3 cycling must take place in a location away from all street traffic (e.g., parks, bicycle paths).

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players).

Teacher/supervisor must be aware of weather forecast.

Cycling must be cancelled in adverse conditions.

Racing must not be done as an in-class activity.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Students must be aware of an emergency procedure in case of an accident (e.g., any sign of difficulty, dismount and walk bike until it is safe to resume riding).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

2 adult supervisors are required in all cycling situations. One supervisor stays at the back of the pack and one at the front.

Supervision Ratios

The ratio of supervisors to students is:

  • Primary: 1 supervisor per 6 students
  • Junior: 1 supervisor per 10 students
  • Intermediate: 1 supervisor per 15 students

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Dancing/Rhythmic Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Consult the Cheerleading - Spirit/Dance page in the Intramural module

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Electrical equipment must be in good working order and a safe distance from activity.

No rhythmic clubs.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Bare feet permitted.

Gymnastic slippers or running shoes.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area (e.g., gym or large room) must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Instruct students in safe use of equipment (e.g., ribbon sticks).

Modify activity to the age and ability level of students (e.g., throws of equipment [ropes, ribbons, hoops, etc.] are to be kept to a low height.)

Supervision

On-site supervision is required for rhythmic activities.

In-the-area supervision is required for dance.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Dodgeball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Use soft objects (e.g., foam balls, sponges, beach balls, elephant- skin balls, utility balls).

No under inflated balls (e.g., volleyballs).

No beanbags or hard flying discs (e.g., Frisbees).

Equipment must not have hard or sharp edges.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all the facilities are safe for use.

The playing surface must be free of all obstacles (e.g., desks, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

All the doors in and out of the playing area must be closed.

There must be adequate space for all participants.

Outdoors

Communicate to the students the boundary lines for the activity.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Immovable hazards (e.g. goalposts) must be identified to the students and marked with pylons.

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8 m (6') high.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

Activities/rules must be modified based on the skill level, age and facilities/equipment available.

Contact with the ball must be below the target's waist.

Students who are targets must be on their feet. Jumping to avoid a thrown ball and landing on their feet is permissible.

Safe zones must be clearly delineated at a safe distance from walls, stages, obstacles.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for dodgeball games.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Dragon Boat

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible for all activities/locations.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Paddles and boats must be checked to assess that:

  • there are no splinters or cracks
  • the head, tail, drum, drummer’s seat, and steering oar are securely fitted
  • the boat is not leaking and that bailers are in it
  • the centre seat is in place if it is a split boat
  • the buoyancy compartments are functional and sufficient to create positive buoyancy
  • the boat meets Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide requirements for small crafts.

Paddles must be the appropriate size for the age and size of students.

2 audible alarm signals (e.g., whistle, air horn) must be carried by the helm (boat steers-person).

A motorized safety craft must be equipped with a bull-horn/megaphone.

Correctly fitting, properly fastened and Canadian approved lifejacket/PFD must be worn at all times during dragon boating.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and securely fitted footwear must be worn.

Glasses, if worn, must have a safety strap.

A dry change of clothes must be available on shore.

Coaches are required to wear PFDs while on the water at all times.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Water and weather conditions must be appropriate for the skill level of the group.

Teacher/supervisor is familiar with the site and/or site is commonly used for dragon boating.

Controlled Area

A confined location, such as a pool, lakefront, or slow-moving river, must be available for the teaching of basic stroke skills.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, cast, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents/guardians must be informed by letter of their child’s involvement in dragon boating and be made aware of the importance of suitable clothing.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Activity/games must be based on skills that are taught.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Students must be informed of available safety equipment and how to use it.

Before the start of each session, teacher/instructor must inform someone (e.g., facility’s staff member) of the beginning and ending time on water.

Elementary students must not act as the drummers.

Steersperson

Every boat requires a qualified steersperson.

Steersperson may sit or stand while steering.

Steersperson is the in-charge person outranking all persons in the boat.

Steersperson must be an employee of the Dragon Boat facility or approved by the Dragon Boat facility.

Steersperson for each boat must demonstrate the following knowledge and skills:

  • steersperson must read and understand Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide.
  • be able to manage the team and exercise authority over team members
  • load the boat
  • balance the boat
  • maintain a straight course at full racing speed with a full crew of 18-20 paddlers plus drummer
  • steer a figure eight course around two buoys at normal speed with a full crew, in both directions, or in the absence of buoys, steer a set course which includes both left and right angled turns
  • execute sideways manoeuvres without going forwards
  • turn the boat through 360 degrees in both directions without the use of paddlers
  • guide the boat forward in a straight line without the use of paddlers
  • guide the boat in reverse for 50m (164') with the use of paddlers
  • execute an emergency stop from racing speed to full stop
  • execute safe approaches to a jetty/pontoon/docks in still and windy conditions
  • manage the unloading of the team members
  • secure the boat and determine that all gear is put away correctly

Swim Test

Prior to dragon boating, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a qualified instructor/guard (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Teacher supervisor must be aware of swim test results.

Students who do not pass the swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not dragon boat.

Safety Procedure

Should students require assistance at any time during the session, the drummer or steersperson must raise his or her hand, accompanied by a series of three short bursts through the sounding device provided to signal the first aid provider/safety boat.

Before the start of each session, all paddlers are required to pair up with the paddler beside them, in case of emergencies (buddy system). The first pair is also responsible for the drummer and the last pair for the steersperson.

Steersperson must be able to use, and crew must correctly respond to common dragon boat racing commands.

Emergency Procedure

All coaches/instructors must be knowledgeable of the established safety and emergency procedures. Coaches must outline these procedures to paddlers, steersperson and other trip supervisors.

If standards vary between the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines and an activity provider, implement the higher standards.

In the event that a boat is swamped, the following procedures must be followed:

  • steersperson must be aware of any special conditions (e.g., asthma) that may apply to an individual paddler
  • the steersperson must take charge of the crew until the motorized safety boat arrives
  • the crew must hold onto the boat (students must be instructed not to swim to shore)
  • each student must determine that his/her partner is in view (buddy system)
  • each student must inform the steersperson if partner is missing (buddy system)
  • the approach of the safety boat must not endanger (e.g., trap) any participants in the water
  • each student must follow steersperson/first aid provider instructions
  • if boat has sufficient flotation – crew must get into boat and paddle to shore. If not, hang onto boat and follow instructions of steersperson.

In case of an emergency, a pre-determined return route must be established.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • water conditions (e.g. temperature, currents, tides and wave conditions).
  • visibility of 500m (1640’) is required
  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Students must receive instruction in the prevention and treatment of hypothermia.

Supervisors must be aware of weather forecasts, especially wind conditions, temperature of the day, potential for thunder/lightning and fog conditions.

Dragon boating must be cancelled in adverse weather conditions.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Supervision Ratios

For the initial on-the-water instruction, the teacher/instructor-to-student ratio is 1:10.

After the initial instruction there must be 2 supervisors/ instructors per boat. One supervisor/instructor is in the dragon boat and the other supervisor/instructor is on land or in the motorized safety boat maintaining visual contact.

Instructor Qualifications

One instructor must hold one of the following current qualifications:

  • minimum ORCKA Level 1 Lake Water or Flatwater Instructor
  • demonstrate competencies listed for steersperson in Special Rules/Instructions column
  • certification as required by Dragon Boat Canada

Steersperson Qualifications

The dragon boat steersperson must possess one of the following qualifications:

  • Dragon Boat Canada’s Steering Accreditation Course
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a steersperson in dragon boat racing, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatics instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 instructor per 50 students, with both instructors certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test

One instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one supervisor must have one of the following current first aid certifications:

  • N.L. certificate
  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Designate a supervisor (e.g., teacher or parent) to transport an injured student to hospital. This must not be the supervisor of the excursion.

Safety Craft

If instruction is taking place in a pool, no safety craft is required.

A safety craft is a designated craft that is rescue-capable, taking into consideration necessary factors (e.g., distance from shore, weather, water and wind conditions), and contains at least one instructor, trip guide or individual who meets the first aid certification.

A motorized safety craft must be in the water and accessible while students are dragon boating. The operator of the motorized safety craft must have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card and must have experience in navigating the craft.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Field Hockey

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Regulation field hockey sticks.

Sticks must be checked regularly for cracks.

Use regulation field hockey ball or indoor soft ball.

A properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) CSA approved hockey helmet with cage, and full goalie equipment including throat protector, must be properly worn by goaltender if regulation ball is used.

Shin guards must be made available to all players.

Use equipment suitable to age and ability of students (e.g., cosom sticks, soft ball).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Cleats must not be worn.

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface must be checked regularly. It must be clear of debris and provide safe footing and traction.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Portable Field Hockey Goal Posts

Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher in moving portable field hockey goals. Constant visual supervision is required.

Teachers must inform students of procedures for moving portable field hockey goals and review periodically

Teacher is to designate an area a safe distance from the path of moving portable field hockey goals in which other students are to stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way)

Portable field hockey goals are to be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

Portable field hockey goal posts must be checked prior to use to determine they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students are to be instructed not to hang or swing on the portable goals.

After use, portable field hockey goals must be taken apart, removed or secured in a way such that they will not tip over (e.g., chained face-to-face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Modify the skills and rules to meet the age and ability of students (e.g., no goalie).

At no time can the stick be brought above waist level.

Implement a soccer goal-size crease area for the protection of the goalie.

No other player or player’s stick is allowed in crease.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Fitness Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This page applies to Aerobics, Circuit Training, etc., using a variety of equipment (e.g., chinning bar, stability ball, slides, steps, tubing, medicine ball, balance board).

Consult Intramural Appendix N: Safety in Fitness Rooms

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

The fitness equipment must be appropriate in size and weight for the student.

Only small hand-held fixed weights up to 2.2kg (5lbs) maximum (e.g., moulded plastic dumbbells) can be used in fitness activities.

Weights must be appropriate to the size and ability of student.

The electrical equipment must be in good working order.

Steps and/or slides must be equipped with non-slip tread.

Tubing/elastic strips must be appropriate for fitness level of participant (e.g., proper tension and length).

Place a utility mat directly below high apparatus (e.g., chinning bar, peg board).

Students may use personal audio devices with headphones after initial instruction on any equipment that does not require a spotter or ongoing instruction, or when students do not need to be aware of their external surroundings (e.g. traffic on streets). The personal audio device must not pose a safety hazard (e.g., headphone cord length).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery with the exception of soft/flexible bands on fitness monitors.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Activity surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables and chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

To provide free flow of motion, allow adequate space between activities, equipment and walls and doors.

Limit activities on stages to those that are stationary (e.g., tubing, chinning bar, stretching).

Fitness room must be locked when unsupervised.

Outdoor Running

Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems.

Before initial attempt, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).

If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Indoor Running - Use of Hallways and Stairs

At turnaround or end points, designate a safety or slow down zone (e.g. using pylons).

Designate a safety zone (e.g. using pylons) for all doors that open out into the hall.

Where school hallways or stairways are used for fitness training, appropriate safety measures must be in place:

  • hallway protrusions must be clearly marked
  • inform appropriate staff members of times and locations of fitness training
  • no running to take place where showcases present a hazard
  • hall double doors have to be secured open
  • monitors must be positioned at corners
  • floor surface must be dry and provide good footing
  • stairways must have a railing
  • students must be instructed on safety procedure for running stairs (e.g. one step at a time, blind spots, spatial awareness, using railings for balance, maintaining body control, respect for personal space)

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Use proper progression of activities:

  • warm up
  • muscle strength/endurance
  • peak work
  • stretching
  • cool down

Where fitness activities constitute the main part of the lesson, a proper warm-up and cool-down must be provided.

Resistance training for the development of endurance can be done emphasizing high repetitions and/or low weights.

Where fitness equipment is being used, (e.g., treadmills, stationary bicycle, medicine ball, chinning bar, tubing) students must be instructed in and demonstrate competency in the proper use of the equipment before using it independently.

A process must be in place where equipment needing repair is identified and removed from use.

Stress correct body alignment for injury prevention.

Permit students to work at personal levels of intensity (e.g., students who can make responsible decisions related to low-impact to high-impact and low-intensity to high-intensity).

A process must be in place to regularly disinfect equipment.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with fitness activities (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until:

  • assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff; or
  • Canadian Fitness Standard certification or equivalent is acquired; or
  • training is received.

Note: Intramural/Club situations require teacher supervision (even in situations where an outside instructor is present).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Floor Hockey/Gym Ringette

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Stick without a blade

Also consult the Ball Hockey/Cosom Hockey page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

A “felt” or rubber ring to be used.

Only use:

  • regulation ringette sticks, and/or
  • commercially produced floor hockey (bladeless) sticks, and/or
  • wooden hockey stick shafts or broom type handle with protective covering on the ends, e.g. piece of sponge or carpet securely taped on.

Sticks must be checked regularly for cracks and splinters.

Stick length must be appropriate to the height of the student.

Goalies must wear protective mask (e.g., properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn hockey helmet with cage, softball mask).

Goalies wear gloves appropriate to activity e.g., ball glove.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No rings and watches.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

Floor plugs must be in place.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphalaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect athlete’s participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

The following rules must be in place and enforced by penalties:

  • no body contact
  • no stick on body contact or stick on stick contact
  • stick must remain below waist at all times
  • no slap shots
  • implement a crease for protection of the goalie and no other player or player’s stick is allowed in the crease.

Sticks must remain below waist at all times.

Penalties for stick infractions strictly enforced.

No other player or player’s stick allowed in crease.

Goalies must remain in crease area during play.

Sticks must be in contact with the floor at all times except on a shot or a pass when the stick may not go beyond waist level.

Only active participants on the floor can have a stick.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Floorball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

The stick must be approved by the International Floorball Federation (IFF) and marked accordingly with the IFF sticker.

Stick length must be appropriate to the height of the student.

The blade must not have sharp edges and its hook must not exceed 30 mm.

The ball must be approved by the IFF:

  • 72mm diameter
  • weight 23g
  • hard plastic
  • 26 evenly distributed holes (e.g. similar to a whiffle ball)

Goalkeepers must not use a stick.

Goalkeeper’s net measures 160cm high and 115 cm wide.

Goalkeeper must wear:

  • properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn IFF approved/marked face mask
  • jersey (protective)
  • long trousers

Optional goalkeeper equipment:

  • any kind of protective equipment, but this must not include parts intended to cover the goal
  • knee pads under the pants
  • padded pants
  • helmet and thin gloves.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and area must be free of all obstacles (e.g. tables, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

Floor plugs must be in place.

Mark the goalkeeper area where no other player may play.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphalaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect athlete’s participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games and activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The following rules must be in place and enforced by penalties:

  • no body contact
  • no blocking/screening of opposite player
  • no stick on body contact or stick on stick contact
  • stick must remain below waist at all times (including back swing and follow through)
  • ball to be played below knee level at all times

Implement a crease for protection of goalie. No other player’s stick is allowed in the crease.

All other International Floorball Federation Rules of the game are to be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Football

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Flag/Touch

Football – Tackle is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

Use footballs appropriate to the size and ability of group (e.g., smaller football or foam ball).

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8 m (6 ft) high.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

No cleats to be worn.

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing area must be inspected regularly and free from debris and obstructions and well removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

The playing surface must provide safe footing and traction.

Perimeter of field must be marked (e.g., collapsible flags or soft pylons).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of athletes whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games and activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/rules must be modified to age and ability level of participants.

Rules of the game must be strictly enforced.

Body contact (blocking, picking and screening) is not permitted.

Flags must not be tucked or tied to the belt and must release easily when pulled.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gaelic Football

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

The size and weight of the ball must be appropriate to the age and skill level of the participants.

Example soccer ball sizes and ages:

  • 7 years and younger: size 3
  • 8 to 11 years: size 4
  • 12 years and older: size 5

Outdoor soccer balls must not be used indoors for games or shooting on goalie, but may be used for indoor drills.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Cleats are not permitted.

Exposed jewellery is not permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all the facilities are safe for use.

The playing area must be free from debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction, and be well-removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Perimeter of the field must be marked (e.g., use collapsible flags or soft pylons to mark corners).

Portable Soccer Goal Posts

Metal portable goals must be checked prior to use to determine they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students are to be instructed not to hang or swing on the goals.

If assisting the teacher in the moving of portable goals, only students who have been properly trained can be used. Constant visual supervision is required

Teachers must inform students of procedures for moving portable goals and review periodically

Teacher is to designate an area a safe distance from the path of moving portable goal in which other students are to stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way)

Portable goals are to be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

After use, portable goals must be taken apart, removed or secured in a way such that they will not tip over (e.g., chained face-to-face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

Only non-contact Gaelic football may be played.

Stress student responsibility regarding individual space.

Penalties for rule infractions must be strictly enforced.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Goalball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Ball that is used must be age-appropriate and contain a sound-emitting device.

Blindfolds or eyeshades.

If regulation goalball is being played, kneepads are required.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface must provide safe footing and traction and activity area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., desks, chairs, pianos).

All doors in and out of the playing area must be closed.

There must be adequate space for all participants.

Court lines need to be elevated (e.g., rope taped to floor, tactile tape). This includes, at minimum, the wing, centre and goal lines. Refer to the court diagram in the International Blind Sports Association Goalball Rules document.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

Activities/rules must be modified based on the skill level, age and facilities/equipment available.

Safe zones must be clearly delineated at a safe distance from walls, stages, obstacles.

Blindfolds may be used for this activity. Only students participating in the activity are to wear blindfolds.

Referee (trained student, teacher) must inform students of what is transpiring during the game (e.g., student proximity to boundary line) and keep control of the game.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Golf

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., grips must be checked regularly and repaired as needed).

Plastic whiffle or foam golf balls must be used on school property (except for putting).

Regulation golf balls must not be used on school property except for putting.

Clubs of appropriate length.

Fully equipped golf bags must be appropriate in size and weight for students.

Golf cages must be in good repair and securely attached to surface.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No hanging jewelry.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Adequate space must be provided for full backswing and follow-through.

Gym (putting only).

School property.

Golf domes.

Putting course.

Driving range.

Par 3 Golf Course.

Regardless of facility, the hitting area must be well marked and controlled.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

When going to a facility off-campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of the means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Students must receive instruction on proper golf etiquette and safety. This must include:

  • a safe location to stand when someone is hitting
  • how to enter another fairway safely
  • when it is safe to hit when the group ahead is on the same hole

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Establish a safe routine for hitting and retrieving golf balls at a driving range and on school property.

All rules of play pertaining to the driving range and/or mini-putt must be followed.

During instruction, or while waiting to practice hitting or swinging, non-active players’ clubs must remain on the ground or in their bag.

No chipping out of sand on school property – golf facilities only.

Students must have an opportunity to develop skills before playing on a golf course.

Environmental considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must be instructed in procedures to follow in extreme weather condition (e.g., lightning [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision for instruction and practice inside a facility.

Supervision Ratio

When playing on a golf course, supervision ratio is 1 adult to 3 students. Each adult must accompany 3 students on the course.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Above Ground Trampoline

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Gymnastics - Above Ground Trampoline is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Gymnastics - Bench and Chair Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Jumping and landing skills can effectively be taught from chairs and benches before using larger equipment.

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Stacking chairs must not have cracks or chipped corners. The seat and back must be secured to the supports.

No folding chairs.

Benches must not have cracks, chipped corners or splinters on the top surface.

Bench tops must be secured to all supports.

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on mats.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure eyeglasses or remove them.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Determine that there is enough space around chairs/benches for safe movement.

Allow for landings at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g. asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

All skills must be taught in a proper progression from simple to complex.

Games/activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Observe that a student demonstrates control of basic movement before moving to more complicated skills (e.g., forward jumping with turns).

Teach simple forward jumps and bent- knee landings first, before introducing aerial shapes and rotations.

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Instruct student to jump up from a chair/bench and land close by, so that the chair/bench does not move.

Instruct student never to jump from seat over back of chair.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Bench and Chair Activities (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Box Horse/Utility Box

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

The beat board must not be used with the box horse at the primary level.

General utility mats must be used or if more than one section of the box horse is used than hard-side/soft-side landing mat (minimum 10cm [4”] thick) hard-side up must be used.

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

NO gap between box horse and landing surface.

Check box horse/utility box for stability (e.g., does not slide on floor, does not come apart).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on equipment.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Allow for landings at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic devices) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities must be based on skills that are taught.

No aerial somersaults, neck springs, head springs, or hand springs.

The 30cm – 60cm (12”- 24”) landing mat must not be used for landings off the box horse.

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Set up box horse at suitable height for students (e.g., below shoulder height) and appropriate to activity.

The following are appropriate box horse activities at the elementary level: static balances, landings and basic vaulting progressions.

No jumping from box horse if height of box horse is above student’s shoulder height.

Consult Gymnastics – General Procedures for guidelines related to students spotting.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Box Horse/Utility Box (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Climber

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Climber: Self-standing trestles.

Wall climber that is attached to, and pulls out from, the wall.

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Check clamps and feet of trestles, wall lever and floor pins of wall climber to determine that climber is secure.

Do a daily visual check.

When using a Climber utility mats must be placed around/under the apparatus such that there is no overlap or open spaces.

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Trestle rungs must be appropriate distance apart for age and ability of students (e.g., do not have small students climbing on rungs that are far apart).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastics slippers).

Suitable gym clothing that enables students to feel the climber rungs at the elbows and knees (e.g., shorts, t-shirts, tops of lightweight material).

No tights or jeans.

No jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Set up landing areas at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Floor plan must allow enough space around each piece of apparatus for safe movement.

Store trestle equipment securely when not in use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chair, etc.) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g. asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression (e.g., hanging activities from one rung before hanging and travelling along rungs with hands).

Activities/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

Organize students on the climber so that there is no overcrowding.

Adjust equipment so it is appropriate to the height of the students and the activity being performed.

Where a horizontal ladder or bars are at chest height or lower, student may climb on top. When horizontal ladder or bar(s) are at stretch height, only hanging and travelling below are permitted. (Stretch height is the height from the toes to extended fingers held over head of most children.)

Travelling on top bars at or above stretch height of stretch height bars is not permitted.

Students must not jump from anything higher than their own shoulder height onto designated landing mat.

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Horizontal ladders and bars of trestles must not be approached from the side, as trestles could slide sideways.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Climber (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Constant visual supervision for initial instructions on trestles, followed by on-site supervision.

Equipment setup and adjustment must be done with teacher direction and supervision.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Climbing Ropes

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Ropes suspended from a gymnastics climber or from a ceiling track.

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

When using climbing rope(s) utility mats must be placed around/under the apparatus such that there is no overlap or open spaces.

General utility mats:

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Regularly check ropes for fraying. If ropes are severely frayed, do not use (e.g., students get slivers).

Stable platform to initiate a swing (e.g., utility box).

If ropes are used for swinging, mats must cover floor surface below path of rope.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing must be worn so that student can move unrestricted on equipment.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Allow for landings at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction. This includes room to swing back and forth.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic devices) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Introduce rope activities in a developmental sequence (e.g., hanging in a variety of shapes before climbing hand-over-hand).

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Swinging activities must be conducted in a controlled manner (e.g., specify a designated start and finish point).

Stress control before height. Teachers must designate a maximum climbing height (e.g., 4m [13’]).

No inversions. Hips must never be above level of head.

No releasing ropes or jumping from heights any higher than student’s shoulder height.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Climbing Ropes (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

On-site supervision is required.

Consult Gymnastics – General Procedures for guidelines related to students spotting.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - General Procedures

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Mats must be placed on all designated landing areas under and around equipment without overlaps or gaps.

Regularly check mats for wear and tears.

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Landing surfaces to be used for elevated inverted skills:

  • 30cm – 60cm (12”–24”) landing mats of solid or cross- linked foam or equivalent. These must not be used as a landing surface or for controlled landing (e.g., landing on feet) off any piece of equipment.
  • For handspring to flatback vaulting, mats must be stacked, roped together to a minimum height of 105cm (42”) and a maximum of 125cm (50”) using 5 cm increments. The top mat must be hard- side up.

Landing surfaces for feet first landing (e.g., vaulting, dismounts from a height):

  • Hardside / softside landing mat minimum 12cm (5”) with hard-side up must be in place for each apparatus.
  • Mats must be situated around/under apparatus as a landing area such that there is no overlap or open spaces.

The above landing surfaces must not be used as landing surfaces for vaulting or for controlled landings (e.g., landing on feet) off any piece of equipment.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers.

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on mats.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Floor plan must allow enough space around each piece of apparatus for safe movement.

Allow for landings at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Perimeter of gym must be free from excess equipment, (e.g., tables and chairs).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Teachers must be aware of the physical limitations of students (e.g., epilepsy, weak wrists, etc.).

Teachers must create an atmosphere of discipline and control.

All skills must be taught in a proper progression, from simple to complex.

Every lesson must be preceded by a warm-up.

Observe that students demonstrate control of basic movement before moving to more complicated skills (e.g., rotations on mats before performing on apparatus, and perform landings before working on elevated equipment).

When a student displays hesitation, verbally or non-verbally, the teacher must discuss the reason(s) for doubt. If the teacher believes that a potential hesitancy during the move could put the student at risk, the student is to be directed toward a more basic skill.

Students must not be forced to perform skills beyond their abilities.

Mat work must precede apparatus.

Apparatus must be introduced one piece at a time, working towards the development of a circuit.

Landing mat must be properly placed for landings and precautions must be taken to minimize movement of mat on impact.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

All elevated inversions require constant visual supervision.

Spotting

Spotting is initially the role of the teacher, and then may progress to students who have been trained by the teacher.

Responsibilities vary with the age, strength and experience of the student.

Primary students are involved in non-contact spotting only (e.g., keeping approach and landing areas clear).

Junior students are involved in non-contact spotting as above, as well as giving verbal cues and checking placement of mats and stability of equipment.

Junior students can also perform the following contact spotting roles:

  • help peers maintain a non-inverted static balance on benches/ boxes/mats
  • Intermediate* students can do all of the above spotting, plus:
  • help peers maintain balance on mats and simple vaults on hip-high horses.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - In-Ground Trampoline

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Where the trampoline is level with the floor.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Commercial Sites.

There are two types of appropriate trampoline programs:

  • Fitness/Aerobics focus – skill instruction includes basic upright jumping skills and ‘stop bounce’
  • Trampoline Skill focus – skill instruction includes additional skills

Other activities using the trampoline (e.g., dodgeball and basketball) are not approved.

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

The trampoline must be properly installed by an accredited installer and inspected on a regular basis and repaired as necessary.

Where a gymnastics facility has an in ground trampoline, the following must occur:

  • The frame padding is secure and covers the frame and springs/shock cords.
  • General utility mats are used on the floor around the trampoline.

Determine that end deck mats are in proper place.

A safety zone minimum of 30cm (1’) from sides and 60cm (2’) from ends must be marked on the trampoline bed.

Where appropriate, keep the area under the trampoline clear of all the equipment.

No equipment is allowed on the trampoline (e.g., balls, beanbags).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., trampoline/gripping socks).

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on equipment.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Floor plan must provide a minimum space of 1m (3.3’) along sides of trampoline and 2m (6’6”) at ends of trampoline. All space between ends and sides of trampolines must be padded.

Minimum ceiling height 7m (23’).

Where a trampoline is within 1m of sidewall or structural support post and/or 2m from end wall, protective matting must be on wall/post to a minimum height of 5m (16.5’).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic devices) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Where the activity takes students off school property, parents/guardians must be aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

An introductory lesson must be an integral part of the program for all students.

Students must be instructed on safety related to the trampoline.

Only one student on a trampoline at a time.

If a student lands outside of the safety zone on the bed, he/she must stop bouncing and return to the centre of the trampoline.

Students may only jump from one trampoline surface to another where the trampolines are side-to-side, and if there is no one on the adjacent trampoline surface. They must take care to land in the centre of the adjacent surface.

Students must master the “STOP BOUNCE” before participating in other trampoline activities.

Stress control before height.

The following rules must be implemented:

  • walk on, walk off
  • bounce in the middle rectangular area
  • always bounce on two feet; never one foot
  • no knee drops
  • no inversions (e.g., hips must be below head level at all times)

Students must be discouraged from attempting moves other than those allowed by the teacher/instructor.

A student must not be asked to do a task he/she feels unprepared to attempt.

Fitness/Aerobic Focus: Skills must be taught in the proper progression.

Trampoline Skills Focus: In trampoline facilities where programs include the instruction of skills in addition to basic upright jumping and ‘STOP BOUNCE’ the following must also occur:

  • Students must master the ‘STOP BOUNCE’ before attempting any skills.
  • Skills must be taught in the proper progression.
  • Activities/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required during the introductory lesson and the initial instruction of straight jumping skills and ‘STOP BOUNCE’.

On-site supervision is required following the introductory lesson.

The teacher must accompany the students and remain on site.

Supervision Ratios

For the initial instruction (refers to a student's first attempt on the equipment): 1 instructor to 1 student

After the initial instruction (students on trampoline or in trampoline area):

  • Primary: 1 instructor to 6 students
  • Junior: 1 instructor to 12 students
  • Intermediate: 1 instructor to 15 students

Instructor Qualifications for trampoline skills focus programs

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - In-Ground Trampoline (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

NCCP Community Sport Coach – Gymnastics Foundations course.

Accreditation as a NCCP Gymnastics Learning Facilitator.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Mat Work

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Regularly check mats for wear and tears.

General utility mats to be used for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on mats.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Floor plan must allow enough space around each piece of apparatus for safe movement.

Allow for movement landings at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must be instructed not to attempt:

  • aerial somersaults
  • extended dive rolls (e.g., dive rolls for distance, diving over bodies)
  • front handsprings
  • back handsprings
  • back head rolls
  • headstands

Mat work must precede apparatus.

Mats must be placed on floor soft-side up.

When mats are place end-to-end, they must be securely fastened on Velcro strips.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Mat Work (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Mat work requires on-site supervision.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Mini-Trampoline

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be readily accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Frame and springs/shock cords must be covered by secure protective padding.

General utility mats must be used or hard-side/soft-side landing mat (minimum 10cm [4”] thick) hard-side up to be used for landings.

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

No gap between mini-trampoline and landing surface.

Mini-trampolines must conform to current gymnastics regulations.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on equipment.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Allow for landings at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Determine that floor plan allows enough space around apparatus for safety of movement.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g. asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic devices) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

No inversions (e.g., dive rolls, somersaults from mini-tramp).

Introduce angled bed when student becomes proficient with flat bed activities.

Mini-trampoline must not be used as a take-off to mount or vault other equipment.

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Mini-Trampoline (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Constant visual supervision.

Consult Gymnastics – General Procedures for guidelines related to students spotting.

Spotters must be in place around mini-trampoline for flat bed activities.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Parallel Bars/Still Rings/Balance Beam/Uneven Parallel Bars/Vault Table/Flatback Vaulting

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Parallel bars/Still Rings/Balance Beams/Uneven Parallel Bars/Vault Table or Stacked Mats must be suitable in height for student’s size and skill level.

Box horse must not be used for vaulting.

Equipment height must be appropriate for students (e.g., beams at shoulder height maximum, hanging activities at stretch height maximum, support activities on top of bars at shoulder height).

Equipment must be inspected and tested on a regular basis and repaired as required.

Determine that all locking mechanisms are checked prior to use.

General utility mats must be situated around/under apparatus such that mats must not overlap or have open spaces.

Velcro mats must be attached.

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

For handspring to flatback vaulting, mats must be stacked, roped together to a minimum height of 105 cm and a maximum of 125 cm (using increments). The top mat must be hard side up.

No beat-boards or mini-tramps in combination with uneven parallel bars, balance beam, etc. at the primary/junior level.

Vaulting boards that are higher than 20cm at the take-off end are not allowed. Vaulting boards must have carpeted or non-skid top and non-skid feet. Only vaulting boards to be used for take-offs. Vaulting boards used to mount the apparatus must be removed immediately after use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on equipment.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Equipment must be properly secured to floor/ceiling/walls.

Determine that there is sufficient space between each apparatus to allow free movement on the apparatus and also sufficient space for dismount.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must be instructed on safety related to gymnastics and all associated apparatus prior to using any equipment.

No inversions unless instructed by teacher after student has demonstrated lead-up progression.

No inversions unless a 30.cm – 60cm (12”–24”) landing mat is in place.

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Handspring flatback vaulting is appropriate for students in grades 5 to 8.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Parallel Bars/Still Rings/Balance Beam/Uneven Parallel Bars/Vault Table/Flatback Vaulting (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

On-site supervision is required for balance beam, parallel bars and uneven bars.

Inversions require constant visual supervision (including handspring flatback vaults to stacked mats, or, a vaulting table plus stacked mats).

Constant visual supervision is required for initial teaching on still rings.

After initial instruction, and provided no inversions, on-site supervision is required.

Consult Gymnastics – General Procedures for guidelines related to students spotting.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Pyramid Building

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Standing pyramids are not appropriate at the elementary level.

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Regularly check mats for wear and tears.

General utility mats to be used for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open-cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Mats must be under pyramid and extend a minimum of 1.5m (5’) in all directions.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on mats.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Pyramids must be a safe distance away from walls.

Do not build pyramids near entrances or exits.

Do not build pyramids on or near stages.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g. asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic devices) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Pyramid building skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities/pyramids must be based on skills that are taught.

Instruction must include how to assemble and how to disassemble.

Weight and size of participant determines placement in pyramid (e.g., larger students are part of the base).

Pyramid building must be the only activity in the space.

Set maximum number of participants and maximum height depending on size, age and skill of participants.

Standing pyramids must not be done at the elementary level.

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Pyramid Building (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Constant visual supervision during instruction and first attempt.

On-site supervision thereafter.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics - Vaulting Boards

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

General utility mats used or a landing mat (minimum 10 cm [4”] thick) must be placed to designate landing area (consult Gymnastics - General Procedures for mat specifications).

General utility mats to use for floor work, tumbling and landing on feet from a controlled height (student’s height at shoulder is maximum jumping height):

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2")
  • open cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Vaulting boards that are higher than 20cm at the take-off end are not allowed. Vaulting boards must have carpeted or non-skid top and non-skid feet. Only vaulting boards to be used for take-offs. Vaulting boards used to mount apparatus must be removed immediately.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastics slippers).

No sock feet.

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on equipment.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Set up landing areas at safe distances away from walls and other equipment.

Floor plan must allow enough space around each piece of apparatus for safe movement.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic devices) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

Introduce vaulting board activities in a developmental sequence (e.g., take-offs and landings from vaulting boards to mats before vaulting boards to box horses).

Combination of vaulting boards and box horse/utility box at Junior and Intermediate levels only.

When using an apparatus, students are to be informed of the location(s) of the landing area(s).

Supervision

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with Gymnastics - Vaulting Boards (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Handball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

When playing on an enclosed regulation court, protective eyewear must be worn.

Students wearing eyeglasses must also wear appropriate eye protection (e.g., shatterproof lenses).

Balls must be appropriate for the ability of the students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

Playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of all obstacles.

Playing surface must provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games/activities must be based on skills taught.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

No more than two players to a playing area.

Supervision

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Hockey

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Hockey is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Ice

Horseback Riding

Elementary - Curricular 2017

English/Western/Therapeutic

Trail-Riding: Grades 7-8 Students Only

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

For additional safety guidelines, consult CanTRA Risk Management Standards.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible for all activities/locations.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

On trail rides, a first aid kit must be carried by one of the guides for each group.

Use horses suitable for beginner riders.

Use appropriate, safe tack properly fitted to the mounts.

Tack (girth, stirrups) must be adjusted for each rider and checked by the instructor.

For English and Western saddles, use appropriate stirrups. For therapeutic riding use safety stirrups (e.g. Peacock, Foot Free or Devonshires).

Safety stirrups for all saddles.

Riders must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn riding helmet with chinstraps certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. BSI, ASTM or SEI)

Riders in therapeutic riding programs must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn riding helmet with chinstraps certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. BSI, ASTM or SEI) when riding, grooming, tacking, and doing on ground activities.

Guides on trail rides need:

  • a communication system for all trail rides (e.g., walkie-talkie, working cell phone);
  • a whistle;
  • a lead rope;
  • a sharp knife;
  • a hoof pick; and
  • an extra halter.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate riding attire (e.g., boots with heels, loose or stretch pants).

Footwear worn must be appropriate to the type of stirrup used, and to the age and ability of the rider.

No hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all the facilities are safe for use.

Any stable being used for the instruction of students with special needs must be a CanTRA Accredited Centre.

Riding areas (indoor or outdoor) must provide adequate space and good footing and are free of potential hazards, (e.g., broken gates, roadways).

An enclosed area for the initial instruction must be used.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Instructors must be informed of all students who have medical conditions that present a risk.

Parents/guardians must be informed by letter of their child’s involvement in horseback riding, the means of transportation used to get to the site, and be made aware of the importance of suitable clothing and equipment.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Students must be instructed on safe handling and riding techniques.

Students must follow the established rules regarding riding areas, treatment of horses, allowable activities, etc.

Discuss implementation of Emergency Action Plan with facility staff.

Until a rider is able to demonstrate to a qualified riding instructor how to stop, turn and ride in a balanced and controlled manner, he/she is not allowed to ride on the trails.

Beginners are to be supervised by a knowledgeable employee of the facility during the pre-mount handling and tacking of the horse or pony.

While riders are mounting, horse must be held by a supervisor or use a ‘mounting block’.

On Trail Rides

For therapeutic riding, accessibility to detailed medical information is critical.

Trail ride guide must select trails appropriate to the ability of the students.

No dismounting from the horse during the ride unless duration of ride exceeds one hour, and then only with the assistance of the trail guide.

While riding uphill or downhill, all horses must be kept to a walk.

Bareback riding is not permitted with the exception of therapeutic riding when it may be appropriate for the student to ride on a pad with a surcingle and handle.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing)

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Teacher must be on the site.

On-site supervision by a qualified instructor for initial instruction purposes.

In-the-area supervision by a qualified instructor after initial instruction and when out on trails.

Supervision Ratios

1 instructor per 1 student for the initial instruction and for therapeutic instruction.

1 instructor per 5 students after the initial instruction.

All rides must have a ratio of 1 trail guide per 5 riders.

Therapeutic Riding

When mounting, the number of supervisors (e.g. leader, instructor, trained volunteer) must be appropriate to the needs of the student.

When riding, the number of leaders and sidewalkers must be appropriate to the needs of the student.

Instructor Qualifications

Instructors must have one of the following certifications (appropriate for the type of riding):

Western:

  • Current Equine Canada Instructor of Beginners - Western
  • Current Equine Canada Coach - Western
  • equivalent approved by OEF

English:

  • Current Equine Canada Instructor of Beginners - English
  • Current Equine Canada Coach - English
  • equivalent approved by OEF

Therapeutic Riding:

  • Canadian Therapeutic Riding Senior Instructor (CTRSI) Certificate
  • Canadian Therapeutic Riding Intermediate Instructor (CTRII) Certificate

Trail Guides:

  • Current Association of Riding Establishments/Ontario Equestrian Federation Trail Guides Certification Program Certificate or
  • equivalent approved by OEF.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

In-Line Skating/Quad Roller Skating

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

Skates must be checked to determine:

  • that the brakes are not loose or worn out;
  • that the wheels are free of dirt, grime and oil; and
  • that the wheels are not loose or wobbly.

Teachers must communicate to the students and parents/guardians the importance of wearing:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn bicycle helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. CSA, CSPC, ASTM, Snell, BSI, AS);
  • properly fitting skates;
  • knee pads;
  • elbow pads; and
  • wrist guards.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., long sleeved shirts to prevent scrapes and cuts).

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Skating surface must be dry and free of any obstacles and debris.

Commercial/Municipal In-Line/Skate Park

All commercial/municipal in-line/skate park facilities must meet the safety guidelines outlined on this page.

On School Site

Designate a skating area free from traffic and significant inclines.

The gymnasium size must be appropriate for the number and ability of students.

Neighbourhood Streets or Paved Trails (grades 7 and 8 only)

Follow all the municipal by-law regulations pertaining to in-line skating.

Select routes carefully in terms of the length, surface, slope and frequency of traffic.

Prior to the initial use of the route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems.

Before the use of the route or course, teachers must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).

Determine that the students are not crossing busy intersections unless they are directly supervised.

If using sidewalks around the school, go over the rules of sidewalk etiquette (e.g. oncoming and passing pedestrians), along with taking particular caution of vehicles pulling out of and into driveways.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents must be aware of any off-site activity and the means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

The safety rules must be clearly outlined to the students.

The skills must be taught in the proper progression.

The activities must be based on the skills that are taught.

Provide beginning skaters with their own designated area within the total area provided for this class. This enables beginner skaters to skate without interference from faster moving peers.

Emphasize “skate safe and always be in control.”

Provide all skaters, regardless of ability, basic instruction in:

  • motion
  • stopping
  • turning

Designate skating direction for everyone (e.g., clockwise or counterclockwise).

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players).

No racing, chasing or tag games.

Teach skating courtesy:

  • skate in the same direction as others
  • skate on the right, pass on the left
  • announce your intention to pass by saying, “passing on your left”, or using a bell/whistle.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Neighbourhood Streets or Paved Trails (grades 7 and 8 only)

Students must have mastered the basic skills.

Yield to pedestrians.

Skate with a buddy.

Be aware of emergency procedures in case of injury.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On school site: On-site supervision is required.

Neighbourhood Streets or Paved Trails (grades 7 and 8 only): In-the-area supervision is required.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with in-line skating/quad roller skating (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Outside instructor: An outside instructor must have a certification of, or experience in, instruction of in-line skating.

Supervision Ratio

1 supervisor per 15 students

There must be a minimum of 2 supervisors – one supervisor leading the group and one supervisor following at the end of the group.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Inuit Games

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Cultural Context:

In the Inuit tradition, there is a practical goal for each Inuit Game (e.g., strength, agility, coordination, endurance, practical skill development). Each game helps community members hone the hunting and survival skills they need in order to thrive in their Arctic landscape. The games are played throughout life as a in order to keep one’s skills sharp. The practical skill practiced in each game should be discussed as a part of its instruction. Many of these games are included in the competitions at the Arctic Games, for which communities come together from across the Arctic.

Perhaps unique to the Arctic Games, and the practice of each traditional skill through games, is the spirit of cooperation within the competition. It is desirable for Inuit community members to master the hunting and survival skills represented by each game so they may contribute to the survival of their entire community. If one person is hurt or displays poor skills, that person cannot effectively contribute to the village. Community members work together for the survival of all in their community, and as such focus on any one individual is strongly discouraged. Therefore, even though the competitive nature of the games encourages improvement amongst competitors, the ultimate goal is to ensure the entire community improves so their hunts may be successful and everyone is kept safe.

At the Arctic Games, competitors are given three attempts to obtain their personal best. After each attempt, other competitors will step forward and offer their suggestions for improvement in order to help their peer improve. As individuals improve and get stronger, so does the chance of survival for everyone in the community. Competition is the motivation, but cooperation is ultimately the key to success.

Sample Inuit Games Groupings:

Push-Pull and Wrestling/Strength Activities/Games: Muskox Manoeuvers, Back Push, Leg Wrestling, Arm Pull, Hand Pull

Agility Games: Ice Floes, Alaskan High Kick, One Foot High Kick, Two Foot High Kick, Kneel Jump

Balance and Core Strength: Nose to Item on Ground In Front, Reaching and Placing an Object

Endurance Games: Knuckle Hop, Running Race

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

The equipment must be size, weight, and age appropriate for skill, ability, and fitness level of students.

School made equipment can be made at school by board employees, adult volunteers and students who are under direct supervision.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g. bare feet, running shoes, or when outside, winter boots).

No sock feet.

No jewellery.

Tie back long hair.

Long scarves must be tucked in or removed.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Activity area must be free of obstacles and hazards (i.e., furniture, walls, ice, deep holes, branches/sticks, etc) and must provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper, traditional progression:

  • Warm-up
  • Agility Games
  • Balance/Core Strength Activities
  • Push/Pull and Wrestling/Strength Activities/Games
  • Endurance Games
  • Cool down

Include appropriate warm-ups and cool downs. Warm-up activities must emphasize conditioning and flexibility.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities must be age appropriate, and appropriate to the strength and skill level of the students.

The students’ body position must be checked by the teacher for proper positioning prior to each activity.

For Push/Pull and Wrestling/Strength Activities/Games (i.e., muskox manoeuvers, back to back push, leg wrestling, arm pull, hand pull), students must compete with partners of similar weight, strength, and ability.

For Agility Games, the technique for proper landing must be taught.

Rules and “illegal” moves must be outlined prior to the activity.

Prior to the activity, establish rules and procedures (e.g., stop/start signal, signal to concede to partner, boundaries).

Students must be able to select a challenge at their comfort level (“challenge by choice”). Students may choose to opt out of a challenge they are not comfortable with, and in these cases may spot or coach other students.

The Mouth Pull, Ear Pull, Neck Pull and Airplane are not appropriate activities.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • Environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV rays)
  • Accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • Previous training and fitness level
  • Length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g., use of hats, sunscreen, appropriate and layered clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol])

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Jai Alai Lead-Up Games

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Regulation cesta (scoop) not appropriate—use plastic scoop.

Scoops must be inspected regularly for damage and wear.

When playing on an enclosed court (e.g., racquetball/squash court) protective eye gear must be worn.

Students wearing eyeglasses must also wear appropriate eye protection (e.g., shatterproof lenses).

Balls must be appropriate for age and ability of students (e.g., tennis balls, sponge balls, waffle balls).

Regulation pelota (balls) are not appropriate.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of all obstacles. (e.g., tables, chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical conditions (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, cast, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Kabaddi

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No jewellery.

No cleats permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Indoor

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction

Establish boundary lines (e.g. pylons, painted court lines on floor or gym tape) a safe distance from walls.

Outdoor

Playing area must be free from debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction and be well removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be brought to the attention of the students. Notify principal of unsafe field conditions.

Use pylons or collapsible flags to mark the playing area.

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8 m (6') high.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

Clearly define areas of the body that can be touched/tagged (e.g., arms, legs, back).

Inform students that a tag is a touch, not a push, grab or punch.

Flags must not be tucked or tied to the belt and must release easily when pulled.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On site supervision

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Kinball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Large inflated ball (e.g., Earthball, Omnikin Ball).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free from obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

All access/exit doors must be closed.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/rules must be modified based on skill level, age and facilities/equipment available.

Rules of Kinball must be strictly enforced.

No intentional body on body contact with an opposing player.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Kindergarten/Primary Grades - Wheel Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

(e.g. Tricycles, Scooters, Wagons)

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Students riding tricycle on school property are not required to wear helmets. If students ride tricycles on public sidewalks/roadways they must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved bicycle helmet.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Facilities

Determine that facilities are safe for use.

Surface is smooth and without ruts or holes.

Activity area is free of hazards and obstacles.

Boundary lines of the riding area are a safe distance from playground structures, walls, poles and fences and communicated to the students.

Size of the activity area can safely accommodate the number of riders.

Number of wheeling participants does not present a safety hazard.

Outline specific areas for students to get on and get off their equipment.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., anaphylaxis, asthma, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Instruct students on the proper riding techniques.

Check that the size of the equipment must be appropriate for the rider.

Emphasis is to be placed on controlled riding.

Instruct students that racing must not be done.

Instruct students to keep a safe distance from each other.

Outline the following safety rules to be followed for each activity.

Tricycles

Riders must be seated at all times when pedaling.

No standing on the back of the tricycle.

One person on the tricycle at a time.

Two hands on the handlebars at all times.

All riders are to travel in the same direction in the designated area.

Students are to use designated area to get on and off the tricycles.

No riding on the play structure ground cover or under the structure.

Tricycles are size appropriate for height of child. (Toes are able to touch the ground on both sides of the tricycle.)

Wagons

Wagons must be stopped for students to get on and off.

Riders must be seated at all times with arms and legs inside the wagon.

Maximum of two riders.

NO pushing the wagon from behind.

Student pulling the wagon must walk.

Wagons are to travel in the same direction in the designated area.

No wagons on the play structure ground cover or under the structure.

Scooters

One person on the scooter at a time.

Two hands on the handle grips at all times.

All riders are to travel in the same direction.

Students are to use designated area to get on and off the scooter.

No scooters on the play structure ground cover or under the structure.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects, frost bite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Supervision

On site supervision.

Teachers must be present where the wheeled vehicles are being used.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Kindergarten/Primary Grades – Movement Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Refers to activities for early childhood and primary grades (with or without equipment) commonly used to teach fundamental movement skills. Equipment often used: bean bags, utility balls, hoops, etc.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible for all activities/locations.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., hoops are not bent or broken).

Equipment must be size, weight and age appropriate for skill and ability level of students.

All balls must be properly inflated.

No homemade equipment can be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn.

Appropriate running shoes that are securely fastened.

Tie back long hair.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Activity area must be free of hazards (e.g., equipment in corners and on sidelines).

Floor surface must provide safe footing and traction.

Non-gym indoor facilities (e.g., foyer, classroom, hall, concourse, etc.) must enable students to move freely (consult Appendix G - Safety in Activity Rooms).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Students must be taught skills in proper progression (e.g., stepping into a hoop on the floor before being asked to run in and out of hoops).

Instruct students in floor activities before proceeding to equipment (e.g., balance while walking forward on floor line before balancing/walking on a bench).

At the beginning of the school year, engage students in activities requiring no equipment, then small equipment (e.g., bean bags, hoops, etc.) before introducing mobile equipment (e.g., utility balls).

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must be instructed in how to move safely in personal and general space.

Include appropriate warm-ups and cool-downs.

Activities must be age appropriate.

Set rules and procedures and provide practice in:

  • stopping/starting
  • looking in the direction you are traveling
  • using equipment safely

Establish rules for the distribution and return of equipment.

Walls and stages cannot be used as turning points and end zones. A marker (e.g., line or pylon) must be designated away from the wall.

Establish rules and procedures in the gym before going outdoors (e.g., stop/start signals).

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Students must never be in equipment room alone.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Kindergarten/Primary Grades – Playground Structures

Elementary - Curricular 2017

(e.g., climbers, swings, teeter totters, merry go rounds, monkey bars, spring rockers)

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit is readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) is accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Students must not wear the following items that can cause strangulation on the playground structure:

  • scarves
  • bicycle helmets
  • backpacks
  • clothing with drawstrings, hooks or clips that can become entangled in components of the equipment.

Facilities

Backyard playground structures may not be used.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Sufficient ground cover must be present to absorb student’s fall.

Ground cover underneath the equipment must be inspected prior to use and must be free from debris and hazardous materials (e.g. animal feces, rocks, glass, needles, skipping ropes, string).

Playing surface must be free of all obstacles and provide safe footing and traction.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Hazards must be identified (e.g. structure damage, uneven ground cover) and must be reported to principal.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., anaphylaxis, asthma, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Prior to use, teachers must inform students of the rules of acceptable behavior and expectations for safe play on the playground structure. Rules must be strictly enforced.

Specific Playground Structure Safety Criteria – consult Appendix N – Sample List of Activities with Rules and Expectations for Playground structures.

Students must use playground structure appropriate for their age, physical ability or level of dexterity (consult the manufacturers recommendations).

The number of active students on a structure must be limited for safety.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects, frost bite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Playground equipment must not be used in the following conditions:

  • rain
  • snow, freezing rain
  • when ground cover is frozen

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [see Appendix F - Lightning Appendix]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for initial instruction.

On site supervision is required after initial instruction.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Lacrosse - Field

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Only non-contact lacrosse is to be played.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/ locations.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Sticks and balls for field lacrosse:

Check wooden sticks for cracks and splinters.

Men’s Field Lacrosse and Women’s Field Lacrosse:

  • no aggressive checking with either the stick or the body is allowed
  • no protective equipment worn by players
  • full protective equipment worn by goalie

Goalie equipment – Men’s and Women’s Field Lacrosse:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full cage or a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn lacrosse helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association
  • throat protector
  • chest and arm protector
  • goalie gloves
  • goalie pants
  • athletic cup or jill strap
  • leg pants

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., basketball or court shoes).

No metal cleats.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Perimeter of the field must be marked.

Portable Lacrosse Goal Posts

Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher in moving of portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required

Teachers must inform students of procedures for moving portable goals and review periodically

Teacher is to designate an area a safe distance from the path of moving portable goal in which other students are to stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way)

Portable goals are to be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement.

After use, portable goals must be taken apart or secured in a way such that they will not tip over (e.g., positioned against a wall with the goal mouth facing towards the wall).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents/guardians must be made aware of any off-campus activity and the means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

A student’s fitness level must be commensurate with the level of competition.

When teaching the skills of throwing and catching, adequate spacing must be allowed for:

  • students to make an uninterrupted swing
  • pairs/groups not to interfere with one another

Stress student responsibility regarding individual space.

A safety zone must be established away from the gym walls or playground fence to prevent contact.

Penalties for rule infractions must be strictly enforced.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Appendix]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial practice of skills.

On-site supervision is required thereafter.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Lacrosse - Inter (Soft)

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Only non-contact lacrosse is to be played.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

No protective equipment for Inter (Soft) Lacrosse.

Facemask for goaltender.

Sticks and balls for Inter (Soft) Lacrosse:

Molded plastic sticks or aluminum shaft with a molded plastic head.

Soft, air filled ball.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., basketball or court shoes).

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Stress student responsibility regarding individual space.

Activities/Rules must be modified to age and ability level of participants.

When teaching the skills of throwing and catching, adequate spacing must be allowed for:

  • students to make an uninterrupted swing
  • pairs/groups not to interfere with one another

A safety zone must be established away from the gym wall or playground fence to prevent contact.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Martial Arts

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Martial Arts is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Mixed Martial Arts

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Mixed Martial Arts is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Mountain Biking

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Mountain Biking takes place in various off-road conditions (e.g., gravel roads, ski trails, bike trails, etc).

If mountain biking takes place on paved surfaces (e.g., bike paths, roads, sidewalks) consult the Cycling activity page as well.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

The following statements refer to students’ own, borrowed or rented equipment:

  • Students must inspect bikes before use for working brakes and properly inflated tires.
  • Bicycle size must be appropriate for the rider.
  • A properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn bicycle helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g., CSA, Snell, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, AS) must be worn.

Protective eyewear (e.g., sunglasses) must be worn.

When downhill mountain biking, appropriate safety gear for the facility must be worn.

One supervisor per group to carry:

  • a first aid kit
  • a bicycle tool kit, including a pump
  • a signalling device (e.g., whistle)

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Suitable clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., no baggy pants).

No open-toed shoes or sandals.

Clothing must be adequate for outdoor activity.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Define specific routes to the students so they are aware of the boundaries for activity, whether using a commercial or non commercial site.

When choosing a site the following conditions must be taken into consideration:

  • sun
  • wind
  • suitability of terrain

Provide students with map and/or clear directions.

Students must ride only on trails outlined by the teacher/supervisor.

In addition to the above, when selecting a non-commercial site, the site must include:

  • a level field with practice area
  • a long run-out at the bottom section of a larger hill
  • proximity to warmth, food and other facilities

Prior to initial use, when riding at a non-commercial site, teacher/ supervisor must do a safety ride-through to address safety and suitability.

For off-road routes determine that permission of the landowner is obtained.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Rules of the Trail for Off-Road Cycling must be reviewed.

Ride on open trails only. Respect road closures.

Instruction must be given on the proper position of a bicycle helmet (e.g., brow of helmet is at eyebrow level).

Students must cycle at a speed that allows them to control their bike in a safe manner.

Students must be encouraged to anticipate other trail users, especially around corners, and establish communication, be prepared to stop if necessary, and pass safely.

Before going on mountain bike trails, students must demonstrate (to the teacher/supervisor) competency in:

  • stopping
  • changing gears
  • turning
  • going up and down hills in control
  • negotiating obstacles

If rider is using clips on their pedals, they must demonstrate to teacher/supervisor competency with their use during initial instruction. The clips must be removed prior to going on trails if student cannot demonstrate competency in their use.

Teacher/supervisor must select routes/trails suitable to students’ demonstrated ability.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference and collisions.

Parents and students must be informed of the importance of sun protection and insect repellent (consult Appendix A - Sample Curricular Information Letter to Parents/Guardians and Medical Information Form).

Emphasis must be placed on controlled riding.

Students must be informed that at any sign of difficulty they must dismount and walk their bikes until it is safe to resume riding.

All riders must ride in groups of 3.

If a person gets hurt, another person goes for help and the other stays with the injured individual.

For non commercial sites, a record of students and the route they will be traveling must be left in the school with an appropriate person.

Students must be aware of an emergency procedure in case of an accident.

Parents must be informed that cycling will take students off school property.

Racing must not be done as an in-class activity.

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players) may be used.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Mountain bike excursions must be planned for daylight hours only.

Supervision

During initial instruction, on-site supervision is required.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with mountain biking (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Commercial site instructors must have NCCP Level 1 MTB (to be revoked effective September 1, 2016) or equivalent who is knowledgeable with the type of mountain biking activity and the facility where the mountain biking is to take place.

On mountain bike trails/routes, there must be a minimum of 1 teacher/supervisor per group.

Supervision Ratios

Ratio for Initial Instruction:

  • Primary: 1 supervisor per 4 students
  • Junior: 1 supervisor per 10 students
  • Intermediate 1 supervisor per 12 students

After initial instruction, in-the-area supervision is required.

Ratio After Initial Instruction:

  • Primary: 1 supervisor per 6 students
  • Junior: 1 supervisor per 12 students
  • Intermediate 1 supervisor per 15 students

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

One supervisor must take responsibility for administering first aid to an injured student, and must be present for the duration of the activity.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Backpacking/Hiking

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Single-day or multi-day trips from school or base camp, that travel within 2 hours of the arrival of emergency medical assistance.

Multi-day trips: Grades 7-8 only

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider prior to the activity taking place who must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Also consult the Outdoor Education - General Procedures page

For multi-day trips, also consult the Outdoor Education – Camping page.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside Provider - An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all the necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible and waterproof (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit).

A working communication device (e.g., satellite or cell phone, or satellite GPS messenger) suitable for the activities/locations must be available. This device must be maintained, waterproof protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

A complete set of maps for the route. A copy of the map (photocopies are acceptable) and/or one compass per participant. A GPS to be used as a back-up only.

A means of hydration must be available, accessible, and appropriate for the activity, location and duration of the trip (direct access to potable water, filters, purifier, chemical).

Where appropriate for the route and conditions of the day, a camp stove is to be accessible and appropriate for the activity, location and duration of the trip.

Sun and insect protection

Waterproof matches and/or matches in a waterproof container.

Where appropriate, animal repellent (e.g., bear spray, bear bangers, whistles).

When backpacks are used, backpacks appropriate for the torso size and weight of each student (e.g., approximately 25% of body weight)

Tarp(s) for shelter and ropes to secure.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all necessary clothing and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Clothing (in layers suitable for season) appropriate to the location, activities and environmental conditions must be worn.

Where conditions warrant, rain gear and/or a dry change of clothing kept in a watertight bag/container must be accessible.

Comfortable and durable closed-toed shoes or boots appropriate to the route (e.g., hiking boots) must be worn. Students and parents/guardians must be informed of the importance of wearing footwear that has been broken in prior to the trip (i.e., not wearing new footwear).

Facilities

Check with local authorities for current information regarding route safety.

Trip guide must be familiar with the route (e.g., length of route, terrain).

Only designated trails to be used.

Appropriate environmental and sanitary practices (e.g., washroom routines) must be taught.

Special Rules/Instructions

An emergency action plan must be developed and communicated to all involved with the excursion.

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Completed medical forms for each participating student must be accessible.

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

When backpacks are used, parents must be informed that backpacks are to be appropriate for the torso size and weight of the student (e.g. approximately 25% of body weight).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

A principal/designate in the school, and each teacher (and trip guide [where appropriate]) on the excursion must have: a map of route and an excursion itinerary including an emergency action plan (e.g., supervisory chain of command, emergency evacuation plan, emergency access points, local emergency contact phone numbers)

Length and difficulty of excursion must be commensurate with age, skill level and experience of students.

A system for keeping track of students must be in place (e.g. buddy system).

The teacher and trip guide must take into consideration

previous training and fitness level of all trip participants and the length of time and intensity of physical activity

Instructions and Communications

Prior to backpacking, students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • behavior
  • route for the trip, and the route for the day (reviewed each morning)
  • emergency procedures
  • signal to assemble
  • the importance of treating their feet for hot/sore spots
  • risks of the activity along with strategies to minimize those risks
  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing)
  • safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning, [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol])
  • an adequate supply of nutritious food preserved and packed to suitable weight for carrying;
  • an adequate supply of safe water for one day (the group must have a water purification method and must be made aware of water sources prior to embarking on trip).

Environmental Considerations

Daylight hiking only, except in emergencies.

Trip guide must take into consideration environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, weather, wind, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)

Teacher and trip guide must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather conditions prior to and during the trip;
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk (e.g., wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

When camping overnight food must be hung, stored in a car or in bear-proof containers, or kept as far away from camp as possible.

Supervision

On-site supervision.

For all overnight excursions, two supervisors are required as a basic minimum, one of whom must be a teacher.

Where males and females participate on an overnight excursion, both male and female supervisors are required.

The teacher must assign a leader to the front and back of the group.

The front and back of the group must be within whistle contact of the teacher/trip guide at all times.

If the group is divided into two or more excursions, each excursion must have a trip guide with the required certifications.

Supervision Ratios

(A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.)

  • Grades 1-3: 1 supervisor per 6 students
  • Grades 4-6: 1 supervisor per 8 students
  • Grades 7-8: 1 supervisor per 10 students (single day trips); 1 supervisor per 8 students (multi-day trips)

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one teacher, trip guide or supervisor must have one of the following current first aid certifications:

  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Standard First Aid
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR (Level C)
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Camping

Elementary - Curricular 2017

An extended overnight camping experience in an outdoor environment where students may be doing their own food preparation.

Grades 1-3: Dorm Only

Grades 4-8: Dorm or Tents

Also consult the Outdoor Education – General Procedures page.

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider, who must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside Provider - An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all the necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit).

A working communication device (e.g., satellite or cell phone, or satellite GPS messenger) suitable for the activities/locations must be available. This device must be maintained, waterproofed, protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

Collect and check all necessary equipment before the excursion.

If cooking on stoves, use propane/liquid gas-type stoves, in quantity sufficient to feed all students in a timely manner, plus one extra in case of malfunctioning stove.

Shovel/trowel.

Flashlight.

Waterproof matches and/or matches in a waterproof container.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all the necessary clothing and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Appropriate clothing (in layers where appropriate) and footwear (i.e. closed-toed shoes that provide traction) for the activity, location and environmental conditions must be worn.

Rain gear and/or a dry change of clothing kept in a watertight bag/container must be accessible.

Facilities

Trip guide must check with local authorities to determine the level of potential hazards (e.g., bears, forest fires).

Routes must be commensurate with age and abilities of group.

Grades 1-3 must use dormitory facilities only. A dormitory is defined as indoor sleeping accommodation with washing areas and toilets in the building or nearby.

Appropriate environmental and sanitary practices (e.g., washroom routines) must be taught.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect students participation (consult the Generic section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to the parents/ guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off-campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Students must be made aware of expectations as they relate to emergency procedures, signals to assemble and boundaries for activity.

Program activities must be appropriate for both the age and skill level of the participants.

The teacher and trip guide must both take into consideration previous training and fitness level of all trip participants and the length of time and intensity of physical activity.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

A process for keeping track of students must be in place (e.g., buddy system).

A principal/designate in the school, and each teacher (and trip guide [where appropriate]) on the excursion must have: a map of route and an excursion itinerary including an emergency action plan (e.g., supervisory chain of command, emergency evacuation plan, emergency access points, local emergency contact phone numbers).

Food must be hung, stored in a car or in bear-proof containers, or kept as far away from camp as possible.

Students must not use axes, saws or camping knives.

Safety procedures for camp/cooking fires must be established (e.g., water bucket in close proximity, safe movement when near fire, review of "stop, drop and roll")

No open flame, of any sort, in or near tents.

No bare feet in campsite area.

Students must receive instructions on adequate supplies of nutritious food preserved and packed to suitable weight for carrying and adequate supplies of safe water for one day (the group must have a water purification method and must be made aware of water sources prior to embarking on trip).

Environmental Considerations

Trip guide must take into consideration environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, weather, wind, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)

Trip guide and teacher must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather conditions prior to and during the trip;
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing);
  • safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning - consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol).

Supervision

On-site supervision.

If using tents, at least one of the trip guides must have tent camping experience.

A supervisor, or a student in Grade 7 or 8, under constant visual supervision may fill and light camp stoves as well as light the campfire.

Supervision Ratios

(A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.)

  • Grades 1-3: 1 supervisor to 6 students
  • Grades 4-6: 1 supervisor to 8 students
  • Grades 7-8: 1 supervisor to 8 students

Where males and females participate on an excursion, both male and female supervisors are required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one teacher, trip guide, instructor or supervisor must have one of the following current first aid certifications:

  • N.L certificate
  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR (Level C)
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Canoe Tripping

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Multi-day trips which travel a distance within 2 hours from the arrival of emergency medical assistance

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider, who must meet the minimum requirements listed on these pages. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Canoe Tripping is not an appropriate activity for Grades 1-6.

Canoeing – Moving Water, White Water Canoeing and White Water Kayaking are not appropriate activities at the elementary level.

Also consult the Outdoor Education General Procedures and Outdoor Education - Camping pages.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Lifeguard - An individual who is at least 18 years of age; who has the required certification; and who is responsible for the overseeing of swimmer safety.

Instructor – An individual who provides instruction on skills and possesses the required certifications. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside Provider - An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible and waterproofed (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit).

A working communication device (e.g., satellite or cell phone, or satellite GPS messenger) suitable for the activities/locations must be available. This device must be maintained, waterproofed, protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

Comply with the Minimum Safety Equipment Requirements in Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide.

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada-approved P.F.D./lifejackets, with whistle attached, must be worn and properly secured at all times when on the water.

Two paddles per canoe, with some spare paddles taken along in case of broken or lost paddles.

Paddles and canoes must be checked for cracks, splinters and leaks.

A repair kit must be available.

Appropriate canoe tripping packs must be available.

A means of hydration (e.g., direct access to potable water, filters, purifier, chemical) must be available, accessible, and appropriate for the activity, location and duration of the trip.

For emergency purposes, trips must not rely solely on campfires. A camp stove must be available, accessible, and appropriate for the activity, location and duration of the trip.

Waterproof matches or matches/lighter in a waterproof container must be available.

Set of maps for canoe trip location including marked access and potential evacuation locations. A GPS unit may be used as an additional navigational tool but must not be used in place of print maps. An identical map set should also be available to the principal/designate and the local emergency contact (e.g., park official, area police station).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all necessary clothing and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Students must be provided with a clothing and equipment list prior to the activity.

A process must be established to check student clothing and equipment prior to the trip.

Clothing (in layers where appropriate) and footwear (i.e. closed-toed shoes that provide traction when on land) appropriate for the activity, location and environmental conditions, must be worn.

Dry change of clothing kept in a watertight bag/container.

Rain gear.

No articles (jewellery, clothing, lanyards) shall be worn that could become tangled, caught or cause injury or restrict the student in the event of an emergency.

Facilities

Only established canoe trip routes must be used.

Trip guide must be familiar with the route (e.g., length of route, terrain).

Check with local authorities for current information regarding route safety.

Canoe route and water conditions must be appropriate to age/skill level of students.

Appropriate environmental and sanitary practices (e.g., washroom routines) must be taught.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., anaphylaxis, asthma, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off of school property, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Activities must be based on skills taught.

The teacher and trip guide must both must take into consideration previous training and fitness level of all trip participants and the length of time and intensity of physical activity

A principal/designate in the school, and each teacher (and trip guide [where appropriate]) on the excursion must have a map of route and an excursion itinerary including an emergency action plan (e.g., supervisory chain of command, emergency evacuation plan, emergency access points, local emergency contact phone numbers)

The loading of a canoe with people and gear must not exceed the manufacturer’s load capacity rating.

Canoeing Skills

Skills for the safe manoeuvring of a canoe must be taught in the proper progression.

Students must be instructed on the appropriate loading of the canoe, and trimming of the canoe once loaded.

Prior to canoe tripping, a prerequisite test must occur in a pool, shallow water, or sheltered bay for which students must demonstrate to the instructor competence in canoeing skills, as follow:

  • Lifts, carries and portaging (where skill is required on the trip)
  • Launching a canoe
  • Proper entry/exit from canoe
  • Positioning of paddlers and gear
  • Pivot 360 degrees in both directions
  • Draw and pry strokes
  • Sweep stroke
  • Forward and reverse stroke
  • Synchronized strokes
  • Stopping
  • Paddling forward in a straight line
  • Sideslip
  • Circles in both directions, to an approximate radius of 10 metres
  • Landings (shore and dock)
  • J-stroke, stern draw and stern pry strokes
  • Canoe over canoe rescue procedures
  • Self-rescues into dry and/or swamped canoes
  • Overturned or swamped canoe procedures (staying with canoe except when otherwise instructed by the trip guide)

Swim Test

Prior to canoe tripping, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety, in sequence and without any aids or stops:

  • Rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • Tread water for 1 minute
  • Swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The test must be administered by a certified swimming instructor/lifeguard (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to SurviveTM Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Trip guide and outside provider (if applicable) must be aware of the swim test results.

Students who do not pass the above swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not participate in canoe tripping.

Instructions and Communications

Prior to the trip, students must receive explicit instruction on the following by a trip guide or teacher:

  • Suitable clothing, clothing systems (e.g., fabrics, layering principles, avoiding cotton, appropriate items) and packing
  • Canoeing equipment and care
  • Camping skills and safety (e.g., fire building and safety, campsite set up including tents and tarps, proper storage of food, water treatment, use of cooking devices and camp cooking)
  • Environmental concerns (e.g., wildlife, weather, low impact camping, poison ivy/oak)
  • The use of a compass
  • Map reading
  • The trip itinerary, (route, the route for the day [reviewed each morning] distances, evacuation points)
  • An adequate supply of nutritious food preserved and packed to suitable weight for carrying
  • An adequate supply of safe water for one day (the group must have a water purification method and must be made aware of water sources prior to embarking on trip)

Environmental Considerations

Trip guide must take into consideration environmental conditions (e.g., air and water temperatures, currents, tides and wave conditions, weather, wind, air quality, humidity, UV rating, insects).

Trip guide and teacher must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather and water conditions prior to and during the trip; and
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

If inclement weather suddenly approaches, leave the water immediately.

Daylight canoeing only except under emergency situations.

Navigation lights (e.g., waterproof flashlight) are required if operating at night or in restricted visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning - consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol);
  • hydration and nourishment; and
  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Supervision

(A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.)

For all overnight excursions, two adult supervisors are required as a basic minimum, one of whom must be a teacher.

Where males and females participate on an excursion, both male and female supervisors are required.

If the group is divided into two or more excursions, each excursion must have a trip guide who has the required certifications.

Personnel and qualifications required for 1-8 students: 1 supervisor and 1 trip guide, a first aid certification and a lifeguard certification. These qualifications can be fulfilled by one or more supervisors.

Personnel and qualifications required for 9-16 students when the group is travelling and camping together: 2 supervisors and 1 trip guide, a first aid certification and a lifeguard certification. These qualifications can be fulfilled by one or more supervisors.

Instructor Qualifications

A trip guide or instructor must have one of the following certifications (will be updated September 1, 2019):

  • ORCKA Canoe Tripping Level 3 Trip Leader
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills
  • Or equivalent

At least one trip guide or instructor must have a current lifeguard certification N.L. certificate.

As of September 1, 2019, multi-day trips which travel a distance within 2 hours from the arrival of emergency medical assistance (non-wilderness) require the following qualifications:

  • A trip guide or instructor must have ORCKA Canoe Tripping 3 or Paddle Canada Advanced Trip Leader
  • A teacher, trip guide, instructor or parent/guardian/volunteer must have Standard First Aid with CPR Level C
  • A trip guide or instructor must have Bronze Cross (The lifesaver with Bronze Cross Certification must be 18 years or older, and must not be registered in the course for which this trip is taking place)

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified swimming instructors/lifeguards on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 instructors per 50 students with both instructors/lifeguards certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test

One swimming instructor must also hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other swimming instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Services lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one teacher, trip guide, instructor or supervisor must have one of the following current first aid certification:

  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR (Level C)
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Canoeing

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Single day trips which travel within 2 hours from the arrival of emergency medical assistance. (Pools, Lake Water Canoeing, Base Camp Canoeing).

Grades 4 to 8 only.

White Water Canoeing, White Water Kayaking, White Water Rafting and Canoeing-Moving Water are not appropriate activities at the Elementary level.

Canoe Tripping is only an appropriate activity for Grades 7-8. Consult the Outdoor Education - Canoe Tripping page.

Also consult the Outdoor Education – General Procedures page.

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider who must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Lifeguard - An individual who is at least 18 years of age; who has the required certification; and who is responsible for the overseeing of swimmer safety.

Instructor – An individual who provides instruction on skills and possesses the required certifications. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside provider – An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all the necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible and waterproofed (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit).

A working communication device (e.g., satellite or cell phone, or satellite GPS messenger) suitable for the activities/locations must be available. This device must be maintained, waterproofed, protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

Paddles and canoes must be checked for cracks, splinters and leaks. One paddle per person.

In case of a broken paddle, ensure there are replacement paddles available.

The loading of a canoe with people and/or gear must not exceed the manufacturer’s load capacity rating.

Comply with the Minimum Safety Equipment Requirements in Transport Canada’s Safe Boating Guide

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada- approved PFD/lifejackets, with whistle attached, must be worn and properly secured at all times when approaching and while on the water.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all necessary clothing and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Clothing (in layers where appropriate) and footwear (i.e. closed-toed shoes that provide traction when on land) appropriate for the activity, location and environmental conditions must be worn.

Rain gear and/or a dry change of clothing kept in a watertight bag/container must be accessible.

Facilities

Check with local authorities for current information regarding route safety.

Water conditions must be appropriate for the skill level of the group.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Where the activity takes students off campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of the location and means of transportation used.

The potential risks involved with canoeing must be communicated to parent(s)/guardian(s).

A consent form must be completed, signed and returned, giving permission for the student to participate in a swim test and in canoeing.

Activities must be based on skills taught.

The teacher and instructor must both take into consideration participants’ previous/experience with canoeing skills and fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity.

Canoeing Skills

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Prior to canoeing, a prerequisite test must occur in a pool, shallow water, or sheltered bay for which students must demonstrate to the instructor competence in canoeing skills, as follow:

  • Lifts and carries
  • Launching a canoe
  • Proper entry/exit from canoe
  • Positioning of paddlers and gear where relevant (e.g. day trips): trimming of the canoe
  • Synchronized strokes

Manoeuvres and strokes to be completed:

  • Pivot 360 degrees in both directions
  • Draw and pry strokes
  • Sweep stroke
  • Forward and reverse stroke
  • Stopping
  • Paddling forward in a straight line
  • Sideslip
  • Circles in both directions, to an approximate radius of 10 metres
  • Landings (shore and dock)
  • Stern draw and stern pry strokes

Prior to student participation in a canoeing experience, students must demonstrate to the instructor an understanding of:

  • J-strokes
  • Canoe over canoe rescue procedures
  • Overturned or swamped canoe procedures (staying with canoe except when otherwise instructed by the instructor)

Swim Test

Prior to canoeing, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety, in sequence, with or without a PFD:

  • Rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • Tread water for 1 minute
  • Swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The test must be administered by a certified swimming instructor/lifeguard (Note: this test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to SurviveTM Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of their swimming ability with a Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Instructor and outside provider must be made aware of the swim test results (e.g. students who passed the swim test either not wearing PFDs or wearing PFDs).

When a group includes students who passed the swim test wearing a PFD, the instructor must provide introductory instruction, and an overall experience commensurate with the skills and ability of the group. For example, the instructor must take into consideration:

  • the distance from shore;
  • the depth of water;
  • wind conditions; and
  • distance to assistance if required.

Students who do not pass the swim test (without a PFD), or who have been identified as non-swimmers, may be permitted to canoe if they successfully complete the swim test while wearing a PFD.

Students who passed the swim test wearing a PFD must wear a PFD (a lifejacket is recommended) when on a dock or when at a shoreline where the depth of the water is deemed a risk.

Environmental Considerations

Instructor must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (e.g., air and water, temperature, weather forecasts – especially wind conditions and potential for thunderstorms or fog conditions, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects);
  • water conditions (e.g., temperature, currents, undertows, tides and wave conditions); and
  • distance from base camp and emergency medical services.

Instructor and teacher must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather and water conditions prior to and during the trip; and
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

Visibility of 500 m (1640’) is required.

If storm weather suddenly approaches, leave the water immediately

Daylight canoeing only except under emergency situations.

Navigation lights (e.g., waterproof flashlight) are required if operating at night or in restricted visibility (e.g., waterproof flashlight).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning - consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol);
  • hydration; and
  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing and principles of layer, and appropriate footwear).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required by the instructor when students are canoeing.

Supervision Ratios

(A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.)

1 supervisor per 8 students

When the number of students who passed the swim test wearing a PFD in a group is more than four, an additional lifeguard with a minimum of a current Bronze Cross (within 24 months of the certification date) must be added. Teachers/outside providers should also consider increasing the number of supervisors.

Instructor Qualifications

For an Ontario Camping Association (OCA) member waterfront setting (e.g., local pond or lake in a sheltered, confined spot), the minimum ORCKA qualification is Camp Canoeing Instructor

For all situations beyond the training of the Camp Canoeing Instructor, non-OCA member sites and for flatwater canoeing in a non-wilderness environment, there must be one instructor with a minimum of one of the following qualifications:

  • ORCKA Basic Canoeing Instructor
  • ORCKA Canadian Style Paddling Instructor
  • ORCKA Day Trip Leader
  • ORCKA River Running Instructor
  • ORCKA Canoe Tripping Level 3
  • Paddle Canada Waterfront Canoe Instructor
  • Paddle Canada Intermediate Lake Skills
  • Paddle Canada Introductory Lake Skills
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Lake Skills – Solo
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Moving Water (both tandem & solo)
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills + Wilderness Advanced First Aid + CPR + 1000 km experience
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills + Wilderness First Aid + CPR + 500 km experience
  • Paddle Canada Waterfront Canoe Instructor

Lifeguard Qualifications

A teacher, trip guide or instructor over the age of 18 must have a minimum of current Bronze Cross (within 24 months of the certification date).

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified swimming instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2:50, instructors to students, with both instructors certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test

One swimming instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other swimming instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one teacher, trip guide, instructor or supervisor must have one of the following current first aid certification:

  • National Lifeguard (NL) certificate
  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR (Level C)
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Safety Craft

If instruction is taking place in a pool, no safety craft is required.

A safety craft is a designated craft that is rescue-capable, taking into consideration necessary factors (e.g., distance from shore, weather, water and wind conditions), and contains at least one instructor, trip guide or individual who meets the first aid certification.

A safety craft must be in the water and accessible while students are canoeing. The safety craft need not be motorized. If the safety craft is a motorized craft then the operator of the motorized safety craft must have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card. The operator of the safety craft, whether craft is motorized or not, must have experience in navigating the craft.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Flat Water Kayaking

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Pools, Lake Water Kayaking, Base Camp Kayaking (Grades 7 and 8 only).

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider who must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

This is not an appropriate activity for non-swimmers.

Flat Water Kayaking is kayaking on lake water or river where no rapids exist and eddies are very slight.

White Water Canoeing, White Water Kayaking, White Water Rafting and Canoeing Moving Water are not appropriate activities at the Elementary level.

Also consult the Outdoor Education - General Procedures page.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Lifeguard - An individual who is at least 18 years of age; who has the required certification; and who is responsible for the overseeing of swimmer safety.

Instructor – An individual who provides instruction on skills and possesses the required certifications. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside Provider - An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible and waterproofed (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit) .

A working communication device (e.g., satellite, Iridium, or cell phone, or SPOT messenger) suitable for the activities/location must be available. This device must be maintained, waterproofed, protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

Kayak with adequate floatation in nose and stern to prevent kayak from sinking when full of water.

Paddle (1 per paddler) and kayak checked for cracks, splinters and leaks.

One buoyant heaving line of not less than 15m (49’) (e.g., throw rope rescue bag) per kayak.

One bailer (bailer must be at least 750mL [9oz] with an opening of 65cm2 [10in2] and constructed of plastic and/or metal) per kayak.

One waterproof flashlight per kayak.

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada approved PFD/lifejacket, with whistle attached, must be worn and properly secured at all times while on the water.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all necessary clothing and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Clothing (in layers where appropriate) and footwear appropriate to the activity, location and environmental conditions must be worn.

Dry change of clothing kept in a watertight bag/container must be accessible.

Facilities

Check with local authorities for current information regarding route safety.

Flat water kayaking is kayaking on lake water or river where no rapids exist and eddies are very slight.

Water conditions must be appropriate for the type of kayak being used and the skill level of the group.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., anaphylaxis, asthma, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parents/guardians with a signed response form from the parents/guardians, giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off- campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

The teacher and instructor must take into consideration previous training and fitness level of all trip participants and the length of time and intensity of physical activity.

Activities must be based on skills taught.

Kayaking Skills

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Prior to flat water kayaking, a prerequisite test must occur in a pool, shallow water, or sheltered bay for which students must demonstrate to the instructor competence in kayaking skills, as follow:

  • Launching a kayak
  • Proper entry/exit from kayak;
  • Emptying the kayak (beach and dock);
  • T-rescue;
  • Wet exit; and
  • Manoeuvres using the following basic strokes:
    • forward
    • backstroke
    • front sweep
    • back sweep
    • draw stroke
    • bracing
    • stopping

Swim Test

Prior to flat water kayaking, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety, in sequence and without any aids or stops:

  • Rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • Tread water for 1 minute
  • Swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The test must be administered by a certified swimming instructor/lifeguard (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to SurviveTM Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Instructor and outside provider must be made aware of the swim test results.

Students who do not pass the above swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not participate in flat water kayaking.

Environmental Considerations

Instructor must take into consideration environmental conditions (e.g., air and water temperature, currents, undertows, tides and wave conditions, weather, wind, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects).

Teacher and instructor must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather and water conditions, prior to and during the trip; and
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk. (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

Visibility of 500m (1640’) is required.

If storm weather suddenly approaches, leave the water immediately.

Daylight kayaking only except under emergency situations.

Navigation lights (e.g., waterproof flashlight) are required if operating at night or in restricted visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning - consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol);
  • hydration; and
  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Supervision Ratio

(A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.)

1 supervisor per 8 students.

Instructor Qualifications

A trip guide or instructor must possess ORCKA Flatwater Kayaking Instructor Certification, Paddle Canada Basic Kayak Instructor, or equivalent.

Lifeguard Qualifications

A teacher, trip guide or instructor over the age of 18 must have a current National Lifeguard (N.L.) certificate.

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified swimming instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2:50, instructors to students, with both instructors certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified swimming instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test

One swimming instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other swimming instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one teacher, trip guide, instructor or supervisor must hold one of the following current first aid certifications:

  • N.L.S. lifeguard certificate
  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR (Level C)
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Safety Craft

If instruction is taking place in a pool, no safety craft is required.

A safety craft is a designated craft that is rescue-capable, taking into consideration necessary factors (e.g., distance from shore, weather, water and wind conditions), and contains at least one instructor, trip guide or individual who meets the first aid certification.

A safety craft must be in the water and accessible while students are kayaking. The safety craft need not be motorized. If the safety craft is a motorized craft then the operator of the motorized safety craft must have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card. The operator of the safety craft, whether craft is motorized or not, must have experience in navigating the craft.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - General Procedures

Elementary - Curricular 2017

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place the relevant activity page(s) must be presented to the outside provider who must meet the minimum requirements listed on these pages. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Lifeguard - An individual who is at least 18 years of age; who has the required certification; and who is responsible for the overseeing of swimmer safety.

Instructor – An individual who provides instruction on skills and possesses the required certifications. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside Provider - An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Special Rules/Instructions

All outdoor education excursions must be approved by the principal or designate.

Approval must include consideration of itinerary, suitability of excursion activities to the curriculum, travel time, safety factors, supervision arrangements, age appropriateness (consult the school board’s field excursion policy).

Consult the school board policy related to maximum number of days allowed for outdoor education excursions. A teacher must be designated as the supervisor in charge of the excursion.

Parental/guardian consent forms must be on file prior to any student going on camping/swimming/canoeing/back-packing excursion.

Information on parent/guardian consent forms must include itinerary including dates, routes, locations, contacts, relationship of excursion activities to curriculum, supervision arrangements, cost per student, behavioural expectations, inherent risks, and where applicable, parent/guardian information meeting.

In an emergency situation (e.g., lightning, severe weather, medical emergency) the supervisor in charge of the excursion must follow the school board protocol. If the excursion takes place at an outdoor education facility and the emergency protocol is more stringent than the school board protocol, then the outdoor education facility protocol must be followed.

For all excursions requiring transportation, a list of students in each vehicle as well as a list of the drivers and license plate numbers of the vehicles will be left at the school; the list will also accompany the teachers/supervisors on the excursion.

For overnight excursions, students must provide medical information to the teachers/supervisors.

Refer to your school board policies regarding student medical/dietary conditions and student medications.

Teachers and trip guide/instructors must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather and water conditions prior to and during the trip;
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk. (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

Teachers/supervisors must monitor weather conditions and postpone or modify the excursion to enhance safety of all individuals.

Teachers/supervisors on excursions must have a list of parent/guardian contact/emergency numbers. Prior to the excursion, teachers/supervisors must plan how they will access emergency medical care.

Students must be provided with a list of recommended clothing and personal items suitable for the specific activity.

When combining two activities, consult the activity page for each activity.

Supervision

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Paddle Rafting

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Pools, Lakes, Rivers.

For grades 6 to 8 only

Flatwater and Class I River Classification Only

Class I: Easy. Fast moving water with riffles and small waves. There are few obstructions and all are obvious and easily missed with some training.

In the above class there is no evidence of rapids with moderate, irregular waves, large waves or strainers, strong eddies or powerful currents (source: International Scale of River Difficulty).

White Water Canoeing, White Water Kayaking, White Water Rafting and Canoeing-Moving Water are not appropriate activities at the Elementary level.

Also consult the Outdoor Education – General Procedures page.

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider who must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Lifeguard - An individual who is at least 18 years of age; who has the required certification; and who is responsible for the overseeing of swimmer safety.

Instructor – An individual who provides instruction on skills and possesses the required certifications. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider.

Parent/guardian/volunteer – An adult who has been approved by the principal and has been instructed on responsibilities (e.g., monitoring [supervision]).

Supervisor – A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.

Outside Provider - An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible and waterproofed (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit).

A working communication device (e.g., satellite or cell phone, or satellite GPS messenger) suitable for the activities/locations must be available. If the device is with a person on a raft, it must be secured in a water tight container or bag. This device must be maintained, waterproofed, protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

Rafts must be provided by the facility. Personal rafts must not be used.

Comply with the Minimum Safety Equipment Requirements in Transport Canada’s Safe Boating Guide.

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada- approved P.F.D./lifejackets, with whistle attached, must be worn and properly secured at all times by all students when near the water, on docks and in rafts.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all necessary clothing and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Clothing (in layers where appropriate) and footwear appropriate to the activity, location and environmental conditions must be worn.

Rain gear and/or a dry change of clothing kept in a watertight bag/container must be accessible.

Facilities

Flatwater or Class I River Classifications only.

Check with local authorities for current information regarding route safety.

Water conditions must be appropriate for the skill level of the group.

Instructor/trip guide must be familiar with site including potential hazards and emergency exit points.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Risks involved with the activities must be communicated to parent(s)/guardian(s) with a signed response form from the parent(s)/guardian(s), giving permission for student to participate.

Where the activity takes students off campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Activities must be based on skills taught.

The teacher and instructor must both take into consideration the previous training and fitness level of all trip participants and the length of time and intensity of physical activity.

No diving or jumping off rafts. Proper exit techniques must always be followed.

Establish appropriate start and stop procedures (e.g. whistle system).

Paddle Rafting Skills

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Prior to paddle rafting, a prerequisite test must occur in a pool, shallow water, or sheltered bay for which students must demonstrate to the instructor competence in paddle rafting skills, as follow:

  • Launching
  • Positioning of paddlers
  • Proper entry/exit

Steersperson

Every craft requires a qualified steersperson.

Steersperson may sit or stand while steering.

Steersperson is the in-charge person outranking all persons in the boat.

Steersperson for each boat must demonstrate the following knowledge and skills:

  • Read and understand Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide
  • Be able to manage the team and exercise authority over team members
  • Load the boat
  • Balance the boat
  • Maintain a straight course
  • Steer a figure eight course around two buoys at normal speed with a full crew, in both directions, or in the absence of buoys, steer a set course which includes both left- and right-angled turns
  • Execute sideways manoeuvres without going forwards
  • Turn the boat through 360 degrees in both directions without the use of paddlers
  • Guide the craft forward in a straight line without the use of paddlers
  • Execute an emergency stop
  • Execute safe approaches to a jetty/pontoon/dock in still and windy conditions
  • Manage the unloading of the team members
  • Secure the boat and determine that gear is put away correctly

Swim Test

Prior to paddle rafting, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety, in sequence and without any aids or stops:

  • Rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • Tread water for 1 minute
  • Swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The test must be administered by a certified swimming instructor/lifeguard (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to SurviveTM Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Instructor and activity provider must be aware of the swim test results.

Students who do not pass the above swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not participate in paddle rafting.

Emergency Procedures

All instructors must be knowledgeable of the established emergency and safety procedures for their site. Instructors must outline emergency and safety procedures to all participants and other trip supervisors.

Environmental Considerations

Instructor must take into consideration environmental conditions (e.g., air and water temperatures, currents, tides, currents and wave conditions, weather, wind air quality, humidity, UV index, insects).

Instructor and teacher must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather and water conditions prior to and during the trip; and
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk. (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

Visibility of 500m (1640’) is required

If inclement weather suddenly approaches, leave the water immediately.

Daylight paddle rafting only except under emergency situations.

Navigation lights (e.g., waterproof flashlight) are required if operating at night or in restricted visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning - consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol);
  • hydration; and
  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Supervision Ratio

(A supervisor is a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or trip guide. This term is used only in relation to supervision ratios.)

1 supervisor per 8 students.

Instructor Qualifications

For an OCA member waterfront setting (e.g., local pond or lake in a sheltered, confined spot), the minimum ORCKA qualification is Camp Canoeing Instructor.

Situations beyond the training of the Camp Canoeing Instructor or outside of an OCA member setting will require an Instructor to have one of the following current certifications:

  • ORCKA Basic Canoeing Instructor
  • ORCKA Canadian Style Paddling Instructor
  • ORCKA Canoe Tripping Instructor 2
  • ORCKA Moving Water Instructor 2
  • ORCKA River Running Instructor 2
  • ORCKA Canoe Tripping Level 3
  • Paddle Canada equivalent.

For non-OCA member sites, and for flatwater paddle rafting in a non-wilderness environment, there must be one instructor with a minimum of one of the following qualifications:

  • ORCKA Basic Canoeing Instructor
  • ORCKA Canadian Style Paddling Instructor
  • ORCKA Canoe Tripping Instructor 2
  • ORCKA Moving Water Instructor 2
  • ORCKA River Running Instructor 2
  • ORCKA Canoe Tripping Level 3
  • Paddle Canada Waterfront Canoe Instructor
  • Paddle Canada Intermediate Lake Skills
  • Paddle Canada Introductory Lake Skills
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Lake Skills – Solo
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Moving Water (both tandem & solo)
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills + Wilderness Advanced First Aid + CPR + 1000 km experience
  • Paddle Canada Advanced Tripping Skills + Wilderness First Aid + CPR + 500 km experience
  • Paddle Canada Waterfront Canoe Instructor

Steersperson Qualifications

Paddle Rafting steersperson must possess one of the following qualifications:

  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last three years as a steersperson in paddle rafting, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

Lifeguard Qualifications

A teacher, trip guide or instructor over the age of 18 must have a current National Lifeguard (N.L.) certificate.

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified swimming instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2:50, instructors to students, with both instructors certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test

One swimming instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NLS)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other swimming instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

At least one teacher, trip guide, instructor or supervisor must have one of the following current first aid certifications:

  • National Lifeguard (NL) certificate
  • St. John Ambulance’s Emergency First Aid with CPR C + AED
  • St. John Ambulance Wilderness First Aid
  • Canadian Red Cross Emergency First Aid & CPR (Level C)
  • Canadian Red Cross Wilderness and Remote First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid Certificate
  • Equivalent to any of the above.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Safety Craft

If instruction is taking place in a pool, no safety craft is required.

A safety craft is a designated craft that is rescue-capable, taking into consideration necessary factors (e.g., distance from shore, weather, water and wind conditions), and contains at least one instructor, trip guide or individual who meets the first aid certification.

A safety craft must be in the water and accessible while students are paddle rafting. If the safety craft is motorized then the operator must have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card and must have experience in navigating the craft.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - Sailing

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Outdoor Education - Sailing is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Outdoor Education - Swimming

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Lakes, ponds, rivers at recreational camps, public swimming areas and non-designated swim areas

When using an outside provider, prior to the activity taking place this activity page must be presented to the outside provider who must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Also consult the Outdoor Education - General Procedures page.

Governed by Health Protection and Promotion Act – Recreational Camp Regulation 568. Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Definitions:

Teacher – A person with a current certification from the Ontario College of Teachers, under contract by the school/board. This person is legally responsible for the students.

Instructor – An individual who provides instruction on skills and possesses the required certifications. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider.

Lifeguard - An individual who is at least 18 years of age; who has the required certification; and who is responsible for the overseeing of swimmer safety.

Trip Guide – An individual who has the required certifications and/or knowledge and skills of the route and activity. This role could be fulfilled by a teacher, a parent/guardian/volunteer or an employee of an outside provider, and must be approved by the school/board.

Outside provider – An outside facility contracted by the school/board to provide activity services.

Equipment

Determine that all the necessary equipment is included and is safe for use prior to departing on the excursion.

A fully stocked first aid kit appropriate for the number of participants must be readily accessible and waterproofed (consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit).

A working communication device (e.g., satellite or cell phone, or satellite GPS messenger) suitable for the activities/locations must be available. This device must be maintained, waterproofed, protected and dedicated for emergency communications only.

Person in charge of the waterfront area (e.g. lifeguard) must have a whistle or other signalling device.

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada approved PFD/lifejacket must be worn by identified non-swimmers (consult the Special Rules/Instructions section).

For recreational camps:

  • Accessibility to standard safety equipment as stated in Regulations 568:
    • one or more buoyant rescue aids attached to a shoulder loop with a 6mm (0.25”) line at least 1.6m (5’3”) in length
    • one or more reaching poles of 3.6m (12’) or greater in length
    • one or more buoyant throwing aids attached to a 6mm (0.25”) line at least 8m (26’5”) in length
    • spinal board
    • paddleboard or boat, when any part of the swimming area is more than 50m meters from the shore
  • Blankets and pillows.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Determine that all necessary clothing (including attire appropriate for swimming) and footwear are included prior to departing on the excursion.

Appropriate footwear is required (e.g., where protruding objects may injure feet).

Facilities

Swimming area must be:

  • clearly defined (e.g., at camps buoyed area);
  • free from hazards; and
  • of suitable water temperature.

No swimming in fast moving rivers or streams, or near other hazards such as drains, dams or boating areas.

Prior to swimming, teacher must check with local authorities to determine whether water is safe for swimming (e.g., location and water quality, away from fast-moving water).

When swimming in areas not specifically designated for swimming (e.g. campsite when on a canoe trip), lifeguard must set boundaries for swimming and swim/check the allocated swimming area for underwater hazards.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents/guardians must give written permission for their child/ward to be involved in any swimming activity.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Activities/games must be based on skills taught.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

The teacher must take into consideration previous training and fitness level of all excursion participants and the length of time and intensity of physical activity.

Students must swim with a partner.

A bather-counting system must be used at regular intervals (e.g., numbers students, blow whistle and have them count off). Use this counting procedure at the beginning, every 15 minutes and as the students exit the water.

Duration of swim must depend on:

  • the capability of swimmers;
  • the weather conditions;
  • the conditions of water; and
  • the time of day.

Students must be made aware of all rules and regulations associated with the swimming area.

Students must be informed of acceptable standards of behaviour.

Properly fastened PFDs are the only acceptable flotation devices.

When using an outside provider, diving is only permitted where there is sufficient water depth (2.75m [9’] minimum) and safe water conditions as determined by the outside provider. When not using an outside provider (i.e. using non-commercial areas), diving is not permitted.

No swimming after sunset or before sunrise.

No distance swims.

Swim only in designated area.

Students must not retrieve water toys that go outside designated swim area.

Instructional swim may include organized games, relays etc., but CANNOT include an unorganized free swim.

Swim Test

An initial screening/testing of swimming ability must be demonstrated in shallow water to a certified swimming instructor/lifeguard prior to swimming. To be designated “a swimmer” students must be able to tread water for 1 minute and swim 50m (164’).

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada approved PFD/lifejacket must be worn by identified non-swimmers.

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

The lifeguard and outside provider must be made aware of the swim test results.

Non-swimmers must be identified and wear a properly fastened Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for recreational swims and instructional swims. The PFD can be removed during instructional swims when the non-swimmer is under constant visual supervision by the instructor during learn-to-swim skill instruction and/or practice.

Emergency Procedures

Lifeguards must be readily identifiable to all swimmers at all times.

In an emergency situation, the lifeguard is in charge.

An emergency action plan must be in place and communicated to all trip guides, instructors and teachers.

Students must practice simulated emergency situations (e.g., find partner, assemble on shore with 3 loud whistle blasts).

Environmental Considerations

Teacher/trip guide/instructor (as appropriate) must take into consideration environmental conditions (e.g., air and water temperature, currents, tides and wave conditions, weather, wind air quality, humidity, UV index, insects).

Teacher and trip guide/instructor/lifeguard (as appropriate) must:

  • be aware of and respond to changing weather and water conditions prior to and during the excursion; and
  • cancel, postpone or alter the excursion if conditions put students’ safety at an elevated level of risk (e.g. wind, temperature, lightning storms, fog).

Do not swim if there are any indications of inclement weather (e.g., lightning, high winds). If inclement weather suddenly approaches, leave the water immediately

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to:

  • severe weather conditions (e.g., wind, lightning - consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol);
  • hydration; and
  • ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Supervision Ratio for Recreational Swims (Free Swim – No Instruction)

During a recreational/free swim, the only acceptable lifeguard certification is NL. Instructor certification and OTAS do not meet the safety requirements of the regulation.

Teachers must accompany students to the swimming area and be present at the swimming area or in the water during the recreational/free swim.

The minimum ratio of lifeguards (NL certified) to bathers at the swimming area and in the water is 2 lifeguards to 1-25 students.

If the teacher is NL certified, he/she may act as one of the two lifeguards, and therefore a third person is not necessary.

3 lifeguards per 26-100 students. If the teacher is NL certified, he/she may act as one of the three lifeguards, and therefore a fourth person is not necessary.

For every student increment up to 25, an additional lifeguard is required.

Despite the supervision required, the waterfront director (at a camp) shall determine that, where non-swimmers, persons with mental or physical challenges are using the waterfront area in the camp, additional supervision is provided that, in the opinion of the waterfront director, is adequate having regard to the type and number of children using the waterfront area. R.R.O. 1990, Reg. 568, s. 34 (3).

In addition to the lifeguards, there must be at least one adult with knowledge of aquatic emergency procedures (e.g. location of first aid kit and phone; emergency action plan).

Supervision Ratio for Instructional Swims

There must be a minimum of two certified swimming instructors/lifeguards supervising the waterfront, certified as outlined below.

Supervision ratio is 2 instructors to 1-25 students, with both people certified as outlined below.

For situations where there are additional students, an additional certified swimming instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required for each additional 25 swimmers or less. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications

One swimming instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other swimming instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available.

Lifeguard Qualifications

The lifeguard must hold a current National Lifeguard Certificate (NL).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Outdoor Education - White Water Activities

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Outdoor Education - White Water Activities is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Outdoor Education - Winter Camping

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Outdoor Education - Winter Camping is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Paddle Tennis

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Paddles must be inspected regularly for damage and to ensure proper grip.

Students wearing eyeglasses are to wear appropriate eye protection (e.g., shatterproof lenses).

Balls must be appropriate for the ability of the students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

Only singles must be played unless a proper doubles court is available.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Supervision

Setting up of equipment requires on-site supervision.

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Paddleball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Paddles must be inspected regularly for damage and wear.

Balls must be appropriate for the ability of the students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

Students must be instructed in the safe and correct set up of nets.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Supervision

Setting up of equipment requires on-site supervision.

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Parachute

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Check that the parachute is in good condition (e.g., no tears).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must not put any body parts through the hole in the chute.

Supervision

On-site supervision for junior and intermediate students.

Constant visual supervision with primary students.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Pickleball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Racquets must be regularly inspected for damage and wear.

Balls must be appropriate for the ability of the students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

Only singles must be played unless a proper doubles court is available.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Supervision

Setting up of equipment requires on-site supervision.

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Racquetball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Racquetball racquets must be equipped with a thong that is worn around the wrist.

When playing on an enclosed, regulation court, protective eye gear must be worn.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for damage and wear.

Balls must be appropriate for the age and ability of the students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Supervision

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Relay and Tag Games

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

If tagging is done with objects, use soft items (e.g., foam balls, sponges, rubber chickens).

The equipment must not have hard or sharp edges.

Pylons or other markers are used to define the activity area.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Hanging jewellery is not permitted.

Facilities

Determine that all the facilities are safe for use.

The playing surface must be free of all obstacles (e.g., desks, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

All doors in and out of the playing area must be closed for tag games.

There must be adequate space for all participants.

Outdoor Relay and Tag Games

Communicate to the students the boundary lines for the activity.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Immovable hazards (e.g. goalposts) must be identified to students and marked with pylons.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect their participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

In games where participants as permitted to block the player who is attempting the tag (e.g., triangle tag and train tag) the tagging player is not to make intentional contact to move the blockers out of the way or reach through the blockers to make the tag. But rather move around the blockers in order to make the tag.

The blockers are not to intentionally make contact with the tagger with their bodies, arms or legs, but rather to move in front of the tagger, to block access, so the tagger has to go around the blocker.

Clearly define areas of the body that can be tagged (e.g., arms, legs, back).

Inform students that a tag is a touch, not a push, grab or punch.

Games must be played at a speed that is appropriate for the activity /area chosen (e.g., walk briskly, rather than run, when playing tag games in areas with limited space, such as multi-purpose rooms).

In tag games where participants are “frozen” and required to perform an activity, provide a safe zone where this activity can take place, away from others who are running or inform students of the importance of avoiding contact with a “frozen” participant.

Relays

Students must not be blindfolded.

Running backwards (students must be taught to turn and run forward when fleeing) is not allowed.

Participants in a relay must have their own lane.

Be aware of increased risk with oversized apparel or tying legs together.

Walls and doors must not be used for turning points or finish lines. Designate a safety or slow down zone (e.g. using pylons or a line).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Ringette

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Ringette is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Ice

Rowing (including Viking Boats)

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Grade 6-8 Students Only

Consult the local municipal pool regulations for additional standards.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Correctly fitting, properly fastened and Canadian approved PFD must be worn at all times during Viking Boating.

Shell inspected before each outing (e.g., check for holes, cracks, loose hardware).

Shell must have bow-ball in good repair.

Each shell must be equipped with a signaling device and a watertight flashlight.

Heel restraints on shoes must be in place and adjusted properly to permit effective extraction of feet during emergencies.

Oars must be checked for splinters and cracks.

Riggers and oar-locks must be secure and operate freely.

Steering lines must be secure and operating correctly.

One supervisor/instructor boat must be motorized and equipped as per Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide. Examples:

  • One CSA approved lifejacket/PFD of appropriate size for each member of the coach boat plus one for each member of the largest vessel;
  • paddles;
  • bailer;
  • watertight flashlight;
  • signaling device;
  • motor in good repair, with sufficient gas for entire session;
  • 23m (75’) floating rope

Supervisor/instructor boat engine must be running before students leave dock.

Coach boat must be equipped with a 60cm life ring with 9m floating lines attached in addition to the 15m heaving line.

Must have bow and stern lights attached during poor visibility (e.g. bike lights, flashlights).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and securely fastened footwear must be worn.

Coach boat occupants are required to wear PFDs at all times.

Glasses, if worn, must have a safety strap.

A dry change of clothes must be available on shore.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

When using an indoor rowing facility, the rules and regulations of that facility must be followed.

Dockside/Boathouse

Must have posted walking traffic pattern with hazards identified (e.g., keep to right, dock slippery when wet).

Must have phone with posted emergency numbers (e.g., 911).

On the Water

Course must be inspected before each use.

Be aware of debris on course, especially after heavy rain.

Supervisor/Instructor must inform students of debris.

Be aware of water currents, especially those created by rapids and waterfalls.

All sites must not include rapids and waterfalls.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Parents/guardians must be made aware of any off school property activity and the means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Skill level must be appropriate for the water conditions.

A student’s fitness level must be commensurate with the level of activity.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures, use of equipment and rowing techniques prior to initial practice.

Swim Test

Prior to rowing or viking boating, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke
  • demonstrate the ability to put on a PFD while in the water

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a qualified instructor/guard (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Supervisor must be aware of all swim test results.

Students who do not pass the swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not row.

Emergency Procedures

All coaches must be knowledgeable of the established safety and capsize procedures. Coaches must outline these procedures to rowers and coxswains.

If standards vary between the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines and an activity provider, implement the higher standards.

Should a shell swamp (take on water), rowers are not to attempt to swim to shore but stay with the boat using it as a flotation device and follow these steps:

  • Crew numbers off and removes feet from shoes. Remain in place if possible.
  • Make distress signal.
  • If necessary, crew enters water in pairs from middle of boat, buddy up across boat.
  • Coxswain buddies with stern pair.
  • Swing oars parallel to shell to increase flotation.
  • Unless rescue is imminent, move crew to bow and stern and roll shell over (fin up) with the wind. Crew should lie across hull, as far out of the water as possible, in pairs, holding on to the other person.
  • Coach boat distributes PFDs on arrival and conducts headcount.
  • Coach boat shuttles rowers to nearest shore. DO NOT overload coach boat.
  • Conduct headcount on returning.
  • Recover shell.

Operator of boat must have Pleasure Craft Operator Card.

In case of an emergency, a pre-determined return route must be established.

Site specific rescue plan must be devised and shared with all supervisors and participants.

A log book must be provided on-shore with all students and coaches required to sign out before launching and in upon returning.

Students must be instructed to remain with rowing shell and oars for flotation and visibility purposes if an accident occurs.

Environmental Considerations

Coaches/supervisors must be aware of weather forecasts, especially wind conditions, temperature of the day, potential for thunder/lightning and fog conditions.

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • water conditions (e.g. temperature, currents, tides and wave conditions).
  • visibility of 500m (1640’) is required
  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Activity must be cancelled in adverse conditions and when there is poor visibility (e.g., first sign of white caps).

If inclement weather approaches suddenly, seek appropriate shelter immediately.

Daylight rowing only.

Students must be familiar with basic first aid, hypothermia, and injuries caused by extreme heat.

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Supervision Ratios

Rowing (beginners): 1 instructor per 9 students

Viking Boats: 1 instructor per 15 students

Instructor Qualifications

Instructor expertise derived from one of the following:

  • NCCP Rowing Technical Level I
  • attendance at Rowing Canada Aviron Learn to Row Instructor’s workshop or equivalent within last 3 years

Instructor/supervisor in motorized boat within 500m (1640') of students during all on-water sessions.

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatics instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2:50, instructors to students, with both instructors certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test

One instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol

All other instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award;
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate;
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate;
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

An individual responsible for providing first aid to injured students must be present and have one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • St. John Standard First Aid with CPR Certificate
  • Canadian Red Cross Standard First Aid
  • Canadian Ski Patrol First Aid

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Rugby

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Flag/Touch

Rugby – Tackle is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe for use.

The balls must be appropriate for the age of students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No cleats.

No jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all the facilities are safe for use.

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8 m (6’) high.

Playing area must be free from debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction and be well removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Use collapsible flags or soft pylons to mark corners, mid-line and 22m (72’) line.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

The rules of flag/touch rugby must be strictly enforced.

When playing touch/tag rugby:

  • clearly define areas of the body that can be touched/tagged (e.g. arms, legs, back)
  • inform students that a tag is a touch, not a push, grab or punch

Flags must not be tucked or tied to the belt and must release easily when pulled.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Scoop Ball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Scoops and scoop balls must be in good playing condition (e.g., no cracks and/or chips).

Goalies must wear a protective mask in a game situation.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing area must be free of obstructions (e.g., tables and chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

No intentional contact (e.g., body to body or scoop to body).

Stress student responsibility regarding the need for individual space.

If goalie is used in a game situation, a crease MUST be implemented.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Scooter Boards

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Scooter boards must be in good repair (e.g., no cracks, broken-off edges or loose wheels).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Tie back long hair if student is lying down on scooter.

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No loose hanging clothing.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

No bare feet.

No sock feet.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Establish boundaries or use protective mats in order to eliminate protrusions (e.g., handles on stage/storage doors).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Do not allow standing on scooter boards.

Do not allow running and diving.

Stress with students that scooter boards are not to be used like skateboards.

In relay-type activities, allow room for slow-down or run-off areas.

Scooter-to-scooter intentional contact must be discouraged.

In scooter-soccer and scooter-hockey, intentional scooter-to-scooter contact and high swings with legs and sticks must be discouraged.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Self Defense

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Self Defense is the act of defending one's person when physically attacked, as by countering blows or overcoming an assailant. (Dictionary.com)

Martial Arts, with the exception of Tai Chi, are not appropriate at the Elementary Curricular level.

However, self-defense techniques can be taught by qualified instructors, as long as throws and falls are not included in the lessons.

For a Martial Arts School Club consult the Elementary Intramural Martial Arts page.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Where mats are required: 5cm (2”) mats, wrestling mats, or mats of equivalent compaction rating are required. (consult Gymnastics - General Procedures for utility mat specifications).

Mat surface must be clean and checked frequently for irregularities (e.g., no gaps, overlaps or difference in height when joined).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (running shoes/bare feet as appropriate).

Loose, comfortable clothing

No jewellery

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Surface must provide for safe footing and traction.

Activity surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs).

Surrounding walls must be padded if mat surface is less than 2m (6.6’) from wall.

Activities must take place a safe distance (i.e., greater than 2m (6.6’)) from walls.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Where activity takes students off campus, parents/guardians must be made aware of means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Practicing of self defense skills must take place in a controlled situation.

No throws.

When appropriate, students must be matched with students of similar weight, height and skill level. There are times during self defense instruction when students of dissimilar sizes may be matched to illustrate a scenario. In these situations instruction must be provided to protect the participants from injury.

During individual or group practice time, students are to remain disciplined and to only use skills learned for their intended purpose.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial instruction and demonstration of skills by students.

On site supervision after initial instruction.

Qualifications

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with any self defense techniques and skill progressions (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Outside Provider: To instruct a class in self defense an instructor must show proof to principal/designate that they have a valid instructor’s certificate or equivalent from a recognized self defense school or one of the martial art disciplines (e.g., judo, aikido, tae kwon do).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

On school site: Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Off site: At least one instructor or an individual responsible for providing first aid must have current First Aid qualifications equivalent to or exceeding St. John Ambulance Emergency First Aid with CPR Level C + AED.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Sepak Takraw

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Poles must be safely stored when not in use.

Nets must have no frayed wires.

Ball must be appropriate for age and ability of students (e.g. foam, elephant skin, haki-sac, a suitable rattan or synthetic Takraw ball).

Net height must be appropriate for age and ability of students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

When poles are removed, floor plugs must be replaced.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Designate activity boundary area a safe distance from walls.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Heading drills are not appropriate for primary grades.

Limit time spent on heading drills (junior and intermediate).

If junior/intermediate students are permitted to head the ball in a game, proper heading techniques must be taught.

Drills must be organized so as to minimize the risk of being hit with an errant ball.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

Students must be instructed in the safe and correct method of setting up, adjusting and taking down of net.

When facility does not allow for safe play (e.g. poles on sidelines adjacent to walls), modify rules appropriately.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision during initial instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

On-site supervision during equipment set-up and take- down.

When using volleyball poles, constant visual supervision during equipment set up and take down.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Skateboarding

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

Parents/students must be informed that skateboards brought to school must be in good repair.

When renting/borrowing skateboards their size must be suitable for the user and in good repair.

When skateboarding at a skateboard park or other commercial site, follow the required equipment rules of the site.

Teachers must communicate to the students and parents/guardians the importance of wearing:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn skateboard helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. CSPC, ASTM, Snell, BSI, AS);
  • elbow pads;
  • knee pads; and
  • wrist guards.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Suitable footwear: closed, slip-resistant shoes (e.g., running shoes, skateboarding shoes).

No sandals.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Selected site (e.g., playground, nearby park).

Public or commercial site must be in good repair.

Select skateboarding area that is free from traffic and significant inclines.

Skateboarding surface must be dry and free of any obstacles and debris.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Parents/guardians must be informed by letter of any off-school property activity and the means of transportation used.

Parents must be informed of the importance of sun protection.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Safety rules must be clearly outlined to students.

Participants must follow rules posted at public/commercial skateboard sites.

Activities must be based on skills taught.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

All students must participate in a formal lesson, which must include instruction in the proper wearing and use of equipment.

All skateboarders, regardless of ability, must be given basic instruction in:

  • turning
  • braking
  • coasting
  • balancing
  • using slopes

Emphasize skateboarding in control at all times.

Beginner skateboarders must be allocated their own space.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players) may be used.

No inversions.

In order to skateboard in more challenging areas of the facilities/site, specific instruction must be given (e.g., instruction on half-pipe/terrain park, jumps or ramps, etc. in order to skateboard on same).

No hot-dogging.

When other classes are outside at the same time during the skateboard lesson, provide for a non-encroachment (buffer) zone between both classes.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with skateboarding (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

An outside instructor must have certification or experience in instruction of skateboarding.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Skating

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Ice

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

If the school is not bringing a first aid kit to the arena, check that the arena has an accessible kit.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Teachers must communicate to students and parent/guardians the importance of wearing a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Teachers must communicate to students and parent/guardians the importance of:

  • wearing properly-fitted skates
  • wearing gloves or mitts
  • transporting skates safely

When skating outside:

  • dress for weather conditions including hats or some way to cover ears
  • inform parents/guardians and students of the importance of sun protection

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Before skating on outdoor ponds, ice safety must be determined with absolute certainly.

Contact local authorities for information.

Ice skating surface must be free of obstacles and hazardous cracks.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Parents must be informed, by letter, of their child’s involvement in skating and that it may take them off school property.

A portion of the ice time must be used for instruction.

Implement a process for identification of skating skill levels.

Provide ice space for beginner skaters (separate from accomplished skaters) for a period of time.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Activities must be appropriate to the skill level of the students.

Stress skating technique, not speed, in all games, challenges and drills.

Students must be made aware of the need for extra caution and control on the ice, including common procedures, such as skating in same direction during a free skate.

Tag-type games, racing and “crack the whip” must be avoided.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frostbite and hypothermia.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Skipping

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Ropes appropriate for skipping must be used.

Ropes of appropriate length for size and ability of students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No bare feet.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must be taught safe use of equipment (e.g., no nooses, no swinging over head, no lasso).

Students must skip in a space that allows for uninterrupted turning of the rope (e.g., no contact with others or objects).

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Snow Tubing

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Only commercial sites may be used.

A teacher must be the supervisor in charge of the snow tubing trip/activity.

A volunteer supervisor is an individual who is 18 years of age or older who is approved by the principal and has received instructions on their duties as a supervisor on the snow tubing trip/activity.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Snow tubes must be provided by the facility.

Students’ personal snow tubes cannot be used.

A properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS-98, CSA Z263.1) must be worn when snow tubing at facilities both within and outside of Ontario.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for outdoor activity must be worn (e.g. use layering principles, hats, mitts or gloves). (“Comfort Tips” guidelines from the Ontario Snow Resorts Association can assist in determining appropriate clothing for a comfortable outdoor snow sport activity).

No long scarves.

Long hair must be tied back.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Only commercial sites may be used.

A designated area must be provided for snow tubing, away from other activities such as skiing and snowboarding.

Individual lanes or chutes must be provided for individual tubes or groups of snow tubes to descend. No more than one tube or group of tubes may descend in an individual lane or chute at one time.

A controlled run-off at the bottom must allow for proper slowdown of tubes.

Distance between descending tubes must not present a safety concern.

Snow tube runs must be free of obstacles.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Emergency procedures must be established and communicated to students.

Parents/guardians must be made aware that snow tubing is an off-site activity and informed of the means of transportation.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Prior to snow tubing, trip supervisor/teacher must outline to students ways to minimize risk and participate safely. For example :

  • Site rules must be reviewed with students (e.g., no running up the sliding area, no jumping in front of descending tubes).
  • Students must receive instruction on the use of snow tubes and lifts prior to use.
  • An instructional component, that includes the proper wearing of helmets and use of equipment, is mandatory for all students.
  • Students must be aware of the boundaries for activity.
  • A safe procedure for moving out of the run-off area must be reviewed with students.

The maximum number of students per snow tube is the decision of site staff and/or designated by manufacturing specifications.

Snow tubes must not be removed from the designated area.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite, snow conditions, visibility)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frostbite and hypothermia.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision by teaching staff.

A process must be in place by which supervisors can contact students (e.g., check-in time).

Site staff in place to supervise:

  • the gate at the top
  • the bottom of the tow lift to hook up tubes
  • the top of the tow lift to unhook tubes

Responsibilities of the all supervisors must be clearly outlined, including circulating to all lanes that students are using for snow tubing and in the chalet facility.

All supervisors must:

  • be familiar with applicable elements of this activity page; and
  • be aware of risks of the activity and the ways to minimize them and participate safely.

Supervision Ratios

Grades 1-3: 1 supervisor per 4 students

Grades 4-6: 1 supervisor per 10 students

Grades 7-8: 1 supervisor per 12 students

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Emergency procedures must be established and communicated to students.

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Soccer/Crab Soccer/Soccer Baseball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Size and weight of soccer ball must be appropriate to the age and skill level of the participants.

Example ball sizes and ages:

  • 7 years and younger - size 3
  • 8 to 11 years - size 4
  • 12 years and older - size 5

Outdoor soccer balls must not be used indoors for games or shooting on goalie, but may be used for indoor drills.

Sponge, fustal or indoor soccer balls are to be used for indoor soccer games.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No cleats permitted.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing area must be free from debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction, and be well- removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Portable Soccer Goal Posts

Metal portable goals must be checked prior to use to determine they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students are to be instructed not to hang or swing on the goals.

Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher in moving of portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required

Teachers must inform students of procedures for moving portable goals and review periodically

Teacher is to designate an area a safe distance from the path of moving portable goal in which other students are to stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way)

Portable goals are to be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

After use, portable goals must be taken apart, removed or secured in a way such that they will not tip over (e.g., chained face-to-face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught.

No slide tackling or tackling from behind.

Heading drills are not appropriate for primary grades.

Limit time spent on heading drills (junior, intermediate).

If junior/intermediate students are permitted to head the ball in a game, proper heading techniques must be taught.

For indoor soccer, a goal crease needs to be established, where no other player except the goalie is allowed.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Softball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Lob Ball/Slo Pitch/Three Pitch/T-Ball

Softball - Fast Pitch is not an appropriate activity at the Elementary – Curricular level

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all of the equipment is safe for use. All of the equipment must be checked regularly.

The equipment that is not being used must be kept out of the practice/playing area.

The safety bag must be used at first base.

The bases must be properly secured.

For lob ball/slo pitch/three pitch:

  • Wooden bats must not be cracked.
  • The bats must have a proper grip.
  • The bats must comply with the current Slo-Pitch Ontario Association (SPO) rules (e.g., Amateur Softball Association bat policy ASA2004).
  • Catcher must wear a mask with a throat protector if they are playing in front of the screen. If the catcher is playing behind the screen, this equipment is not required.
  • Use a ball that is appropriate to the skill level of the students (i.e., soft, compressable spongey ball). Regulation/offical or hard, flight-restricted softballs must not be used.

For t-ball:

  • No wooden or aluminum bats are allowed. Use only foam or plastic bats.
  • Use a ball that is appropriate to the skill level of the students (e.g. P30, P40, tennis ball, foam ball, whiffle ball)
  • Regulation/official or hard, flight-restricted softballs or baseballs must not be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

No cleats.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing area must be inspected regularly for debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction as well as be well removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Prior to use, backstops, fences and fields must be checked for hazards. As necessary, modify the activity to avoid hazards (e.g., mark hazards with cones, cover holes in fence with mat).

The field of play must never be located near an open roadway which an active player might run onto.

If more than one activity is going on, determine that there is a safe distance between the activities.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

The players must be taught to drop or lay the bat down after hitting, not release it during the follow-through of the swing.

For in-class softball, the role of the catcher is to retrieve a ball and return it to the pitcher. The catcher is not intended to catch a missed pitch.

Non-fielding players must be on the bench or in the designated area of the bench.

Student umpires must not be positioned behind home plate; they must stand behind the pitcher or the screen or outside the baselines.

The students must be informed about the importance of keeping their eyes on the flight of the ball when playing offense (e.g., running bases) and when playing defense (e.g., pitcher, infielders and outfielders).

To avoid dangers of a slipped bat, non-fielding players must stand well back of the batter’s box, must be on the bench, or must be behind a screen or fence, with fingers kept away from screen. If using an on deck batter circle it must be located a safe distance from batter and other non fielding players where the swinging of a bat does not present a hazard.

Use a commitment line on third-base line.

All plays at home plate must be force plays.

Tagging at home plate is not permitted.

Sliding is not permitted.

If playing inside a gymnasium, adhere to the following safety criteria:

  • No softball, baseball, aluminum, wooden or cricket bats may be used. If a bat is used, it must be foam, plastic or another low impact material.
  • Use only low impact, limited bounce, low flight balls (e.g., whiffle, soft-skinned, paper, etc.).
  • Check that the size of the gym can accommodate the activities and that the walls or stage do not present a safety hazard. Modify the activity if necessary.
  • Set boundaries for activities a safe distance from walls.
  • No games may be played that require a student to hit for distance.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Speed Skating

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

If the school is not bringing a first aid kit to the arena, check that the arena has an accessible kit.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

All students must wear one of the following properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn helmet:

  • Speed skating helmet
  • CSA approved hockey helmet
  • Ski helmet
  • Snowboarding helmet
  • Skateboarding helmet.

Helmets with holes (e.g., bicycle helmets) are not permissible.

If using indoor facilities, boards must be padded in the corners.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Teachers must communicate to students and parent/guardians the importance of:

  • wearing properly-fitted skates – speed skates, hockey skates or figure skates are acceptable
  • wearing cut resistant gloves or mitts
  • wearing knee and shin pads
  • wearing a neck guard
  • wearing stretchy clothing with long sleeves
  • transporting skates safely

When skating outside:

  • dress for weather conditions.
  • inform parents/students of the importance of sun protection.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Indoor and outdoor facilities can be used.

Before skating on outdoor ponds, ice safety must be determined with absolute certainly.

Contact local authorities for information on ice condition.

Ice skating surface must be free of obstacles and hazardous cracks.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Competitions must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities must be appropriate to the skill level of the students.

Parents must be informed, by letter, of their child’s involvement in skating and that it may take them off school property.

A portion of the ice time must be used for instruction, skill development, etiquette and strategies.

Implement a process for identification of skating skill levels.

Provide ice space for beginner skaters (separate from accomplished skaters) for a period of time.

During initial instruction, participants must keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Stress skating technique, not speed, in all competitions, challenges and drills.

Students must be made aware of the need for extra caution and control on the ice, including common procedures, such as skating in same direction.

No relays until relay skills have been taught.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frost bite and hypothermia.

Supervision

On-site supervision.

At least one individual instructing the lesson must have certification in FUNdamentals Leader (Speed Skating Canada).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Spikeball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use including the Spikeball frame (rebound surface), hula hoops (when used for lead-up games) and balls.

Balls must be suitable for the age and ability of the students and for the activity (e.g., regulation Spikeball, foam ball, elephant skin ball). No weighted or high density balls may be used.

Regulation Spikeball frames must be safely stored when not in use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface must provide safe footing and traction and activity area and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g. tables, chairs).

Designate safe boundaries for each playing area.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

Drills must be organized so as to minimize the risk of being hit with an errant ball.

Safety procedures must be established to ensure students do not enter another playing area to retrieve a ball until safe to do so.

When facility does not allow for safe play modify rules appropriately.

No body contact.

No more than four players (two players per team) playing at one time.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Squash

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for damage and wear. Specifically check for cracks in the frame and head guard.

Protective eye gear must be worn.

Students wearing eyeglasses must wear appropriate eye protection (e.g., shatterproof lenses).

Balls must be appropriate for age and ability of students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of all obstacles. (e.g., tables, chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Students must be taught the code of etiquette for court play.

Only singles must be played unless a proper doubles court is available.

Supervision

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Swimming and Synchronized Swimming

Elementary - Curricular 2017

For pond/lake swimming, consult the Outdoor Education - Swimming page.

All pools are governed by the Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565. Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all the equipment is safe for use.

Accessibility to standard safety equipment as stated in Ontario Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565. Of particular note: ring buoys, reaching poles, spinal boards, first aid kit, emergency phone.

Correctly fitting and Transport Canada approved PFD/lifejacket must be worn by identified non-swimmers (consult the Special Rules/Instructions section).

Electrical equipment (e.g., MP3 players) must be properly grounded.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Suitable swimwear.

Follow the rules of the pool for wearing jewellery.

Device to keep hair from obstructing vision (e.g., elastic).

Facilities

Backyard pools must not be used.

Use of school or community swimming pools.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Pool deck must be kept clear of obstacles and excess water.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Students with infections, cuts or sores must not be in the pool.

Inform in-charge person on deck of any student with a medical history or any medical problems that may affect the student’s safety in water (e.g., diabetes, asthma, heart condition, convulsions, epilepsy, frequent ear infections).

Parent/guardian permission forms are required for aquatic activities that occur off school property.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Emergency procedures must be outlined to students prior to entering the water.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Skill instruction can be followed by skill application (e.g., relay activities, tag games which incorporate skills). This is considered to be part of the instructional program – not free swim.

Students must adhere to the following rules:

  • no running or pushing on deck
  • no gum chewing
  • no food in pool area
  • no diving off deck into water less than 2.8m (9’) in depth
  • no street shoes on deck

Showers must be taken before entering the pool.

During recreational swim, students may not snorkel or use scuba equipment.

Instructional swim may include organized games, relays, etc., but CANNOT include an unorganized free swim.

Swim Test

An initial screening/testing of swimming ability must be done in shallow end.

The common facility test to determine swimming ability is to swim two widths continuously without touching the bottom. This applies to both instructional and recreational swims.

The results of the swim test must be logged and available to the instructor/lifeguard.

The swim test must be complete within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Non-swimmers must be identified and wear a properly fastened Personal Flotation Device (PFD) for recreational swims and instructional swims. The PFD can be removed during instructional swims when the non-swimmer is under constant visual supervision by the instructor during learn-to-swim skill instruction and/or practice.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

A teacher or other school supervisor must accompany pupils to the pool and be on deck or in the pool.

Close and frequent monitoring of change rooms must take place, but not by the lifeguard.

Students must ask permission to leave pool area.

Supervision for Recreational Swims (Free Swim – No Instruction)

Teachers must accompany students to the pool and be on deck or in the pool during the recreational/free swim.

According to Ontario Public Pool Regulation 565, during a recreational/free swim, the only acceptable lifeguard certification is NL. Instructor certification and OTAS do not meet the safety requirements of the regulation.

The minimum ratio of lifeguards (NL certified) to bathers on deck and in the pool is:

  • 2 lifeguards per 1-125 bathers. If the teacher is NL certified, he/she may act as one of the two lifeguards, and therefore a third person is not necessary.
  • 3 lifeguards per 126-250 bathers. If the teacher is NL certified, he/she may act as one of the three lifeguards, and therefore a fourth person is not necessary.

Note: a swimmer/bather is considered to be anyone within 1.8m (6’) from the water’s edge.

Supervision for Instructional Swims

There must be a minimum of two certified swim instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 instructors per 25 students (primary), per 35 students (junior and intermediate) with both instructors certified.

In situations where there are 26-50 students (primary) or 36-70 students (junior to intermediate) an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required.

Instructor Qualifications

One instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

Lifeguard Qualifications

Lifeguard must hold a current National Lifeguard (NL) Certificate.

Supervision for the Swim Test

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatics instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 instructor per 50 students, with both instructors certified.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Table Tennis

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Regulation size paddles and table tennis balls are required.

Tables and paddle must be appropriate for age and ability of student.

Tables and paddles must be in good condition.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

There must be room for mobility around tables.

Smooth, level and dry floor surface.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must be instructed on safe set up and dismantling of tables.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during set up and dismantling of tables.

On-site supervision during initial instruction.

In-the-area supervision after initial instruction.

In-the-area supervision during play.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Tchoukball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use including the tchoukball frame (rebound surface) and balls.

If balls other than tchoukball balls are used, check that the ball is suitable for the age and ability of the students.

Regulation tchoukball frames must be safely stored when not in use. No homemade equipment (e.g. mini trampolines).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface must provide safe footing and traction and activity area and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g. tables, chairs).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Forbidden zone must be clearly defined.

No body contact.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Team Handball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Ball size must be appropriate for the age and ability of students.

Foam type ball or regulation team handballs are acceptable.

Regulation team handball nets must be safely stored when not in use.

Ball hockey nets, pylons, or wall mats can be used for goals.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Portable Team Handball Goal Posts

Portable goals must be checked prior to use to determine they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students are to be instructed not to hang or swing on the goals.

Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher in moving of portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required.

After use, portable goals must be taken apart, removed or secured in a way such that they will not tip over (e.g., chained face-to-face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Activities and rules must be modified based on the ability of students and facilities/ equipment available.

No body contact.

Crease area must be clearly defined if using a goalie (e.g., full key area).

Only the goaltender is allowed in the crease area.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Tennis

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for damage and wear.

Use racquets that are appropriate to the skill level of the players (e.g., junior racquets).

Where ball machines are being used, they must be inspected prior to use and be under the direct supervision of a teacher.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of obstacles (e.g., tables and chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on the skills taught.

When teaching skills, there must be adequate spacing for each student to make a free and uninterrupted swing.

Activities and skills must be modified to the age and ability level of the students.

When playing with more than two players on a court, positioning and movements must be taught.

The code of etiquette for court plays must be taught (e.g., not entering a court being used).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision during initial instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

On-site supervision during equipment set up and take down.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Tetherball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Tetherball must be in good repair, with properly working connections at the ball and at the pole.

Rope must be in good repair and without excessive fraying.

Check pole periodically.

A pole with a severe lean or loose at the base must not be used until repaired or replaced.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Tetherball pole must be situated away from traffic areas and areas where other games are played, (e.g., volleyball, four-square, basketball).

Tetherball area must be free of all obstacles and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game must be based on the skills taught.

Children require instruction in skills and rules before the game is played.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision is required for set up and instruction.

After instruction, in-the-area supervision is required.

Tetherball must be set up by an adult or a student under adult supervision.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Tobogganing/Sledding

Elementary - Curricular 2017

A teacher must be the supervisor in charge of the tobogganing/sledding trip/activity.

A volunteer supervisor is an individual who is 18 years of age or older who is approved by the principal and has received instructions on their duties as a supervisor on the tobogganing/sledding trip/activity.

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Consult Appendix A - Sample Curricular Information Letter to Parents/Guardians and Medical Information Form regarding bringing equipment for use in class.

Toboggans, sleds and other sliding apparatus approved by your school board. (Visit Parachute Canada for support).

Discs and inner tubes must not be used.

Toboggan/sled and other school board-approved apparatus must be in good repair with no jagged edges.

Parents/guardians must be informed of the importance of wearing a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet or snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS-98, CSA Z263.1).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for outdoor activity must be worn (e.g. use layering principles, hats, mitts or gloves). “Comfort Tips” guidelines from the Ontario Snow Resorts Association can assist sliders in determining appropriate clothing comfortable for outdoor snow sport activity.

Check for hanging drawstrings.

No loose scarves.

Tie up long hair so it can’t get caught.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

For any site, students must be made aware of the boundaries for activity.

When choosing a site, the following conditions must be taken into consideration:

  • suitability of terrain
  • proximity to warmth, washrooms and other facilities

Prior to student participation the teacher must complete a pre-inspection (walk through) of the activity site to check on the safety of the location.

The hill and run-out section at bottom of hill must be free of obstacles (e.g., trees, stumps, posts, fences, sewer grates, exposed rocks, roadway, railway tracks, or an open creek).

Tobogganing/sledding/sliding may only take place on snow (i.e., may not take place where terrain is predominately ice, or on sand, or other surfaces)

Monitor the condition of the slope on a regular basis and if conditions become unsafe, cease the activity.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Emergency procedures must be established and communicated to the students.

Prior to tobogganing, trip supervisor/teacher must outline to students ways to minimize risk and participate safely.

To prevent collisions, procedures must be in place to maintain a safe distance between students while sliding (e.g., students may not begin to slide until the previous slider has cleared the bottom of the sliding area, and once at the bottom of the sliding area, students are to clear away quickly off to the sides).

Safe procedures to be communicated with students prior to the activity:

  • Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).
  • Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frostbite and hypothermia.
  • Sliding apparatus must not be overloaded.
  • Students must be facing forward and seated or kneeling on toboggans/sleds/other school board-approved sliding apparatus.
  • Remind students to:
    • keep a safe distance between themselves and other sliders (e.g., may not begin to slide until the previous slider has cleared the bottom of the sliding area, and once at the bottom of the sliding area, clear away quickly off to the sides).
    • roll off the toboggan if heading for danger
    • slide down the middle of the sliding area and climb up the sides.

Students must not:

  • run up the sliding area
  • jump in front of descending toboggans
  • intentionally "snow" another individual.

Parents/guardians must be informed of the following:

  • Location of activity (if off school property)
  • Means of transportation
  • Importance of wearing suitable clothing
  • Importance of sun protection

Note: Also consult the Equipment section above regarding the importance of wearing a properly fitted and secured (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) CSA approved hockey helmet or snow sport helmet.

Environmental considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, UV index, frostbite, snow conditions, visibility)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Only toboggan or sled in the daylight hours or on well-lit hills.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Responsibilities of the supervisors (including parents/guardians and volunteers) must be clearly outlined, including circulating to all hills that students are using for tobogganing.

All supervisors must:

  • be familiar with applicable elements of this activity page; and
  • be aware of risks of the activity and the ways to minimize them and participate safely.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Discus

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Track and Field - Discus is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Track and Field - High Jump

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

High Jump Standards:

Check standards regularly for damage. Repair or replace as needed.

Landing Mats

For curricular instruction:

The landing surface (excluding the Velcro mat apron around the outside) must be a minimum of 1.5m x 3.6m x .5m (5’ x 12’ x 20”). There must be one layer of Velcro mats around the three sides with no gaps.

For interschool teams:

Practices and tryouts (whether done in class or outside instructional time):

Landing surface must be a minimum of 1.5m x 3.6m x .5m (5’ x 12’ x 20”) and in addition there must be a double layer of Velcro mats along three sides with no gaps.

One landing mat, or landing mats in combination, may be used to meet or exceed the above minimum.

When two mats are placed end to end, use a cover or place a Velcro mat over the gap between landing mats.

Two jumping mats used end to end must be of the same thickness.

If conducting tryouts/practices during class time, consult mat regulations for interschool high jump.

Check landing mats regularly for damage.

Cross Bars

Metal cross bars are not to be used.

Bamboo poles must be tape wrapped before use.

Fibreglass and bamboo poles to be checked for cracks before use.

Weighted rope or elastic may be used, rather than a crossbar, for practice.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No bare feet or socks without shoes.

No jewellery.

No spikes of any kind.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Approach area must be smooth, traffic-free and provide good traction.

Where running takes place off school site for a warm up or conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.
  • Before initial use, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).
  • If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Bar monitors must stay in front and off to the side of standards prior to and during each jump.

Stress progressions and techniques rather than competition.

Stress short, controlled approach (e.g., between three and nine steps).

If student is using “back layout”, encourage take off closer to the nearest upright on approach.

Determine that landing mats and Velcro mats are firmly secured and do not slide upon impact.

High-jump landing surface must not butt up against a wall and must be a minimum of 1m (3’3”) from any wall and any other permanent structures.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with high jump (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

When landing surfaces are set up but not being used, deterrents for use must be in place (e.g., mark perimeter with cones, provide supervision, put mats in storage area, place sign on mats – “Use of mats requires supervision”).

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Hurdles

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Track and Field - Hurdles is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Track and Field - Javelin

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Track and Field - Javelin is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Track and Field - Modified Javelin Activities (Foam/Plastic)

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Grades 4 - 8 only

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Regulation javelins must not be used.

Commercially made foam javelins, turbo javelins, turbojavs and equivalents may be used. When using this commercially made equipment the maximum weight for junior and intermediate students is 300g.

Ensure equipment joints and noses are tight before throwing.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Track spikes must not be worn.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

The throwing area must be free of obstacles and completely closed to traffic (e.g., no other activity can be located in the area where javelin is taking place).

The landing area must be well marked and void of people during the activity.

The run up area must provide safe footing and traction.

Where running takes place off school site for a warm up or conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.
  • Before initial use, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).
  • If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills and techniques associated with the javelin throw must be taught in proper progression. The importance of throwing techniques must be emphasized.

Establish safe routines for throwing and retrieving.

Establish a safe routine for transporting equipment to and from the throwing area.

Equipment must never be thrown back to the throwing area.

All participants must receive instruction on the importance of safety procedures when throwing, retrieving the equipment after a throw and return to the safety zone or area prior to anyone throwing.

Proper warm-ups and cool-downs must be included.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F – Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial instruction.

On-site supervision after skills and procedures have been taught.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with modified javelin techniques (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Pole Vault

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Track and Field - Pole Vault is not an appropriate activity at this level.

Track and Field - Shot Put

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Only shots designed for indoor use can be used in the indoor program.

Equipment must be of appropriate size and weight for age and strength of student. Visit Athletics Ontario for recommended weights.

Towel/rag to dry shot.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Track spikes must not be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Landing area must be well marked and void of people during activity.

Putting circle must provide safe footing and traction.

Where running takes place off school site for a warm up or conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.
  • Before initial use, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).
  • If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills and techniques associated with shot put must be taught in proper progression e.g., putting of bean bag, softball before using a shot.

Only standing shot put technique may be taught (no spin).

Proper warm-ups and cool-downs must be included.

Establish safe routines for putting and retrieving of shots.

Establish a safe routine for transporting shots to and from the throwing area.

Shots must never be thrown or rolled back to throwing area.

Where a protective screen is not in place, students and spectators must be in a designated area at least 4m (13’) behind the toe line.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with shot put techniques (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Track Events

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Sprints/400m/800m/1500m/3000m/Relays

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safety for use.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Plastic or aluminum relay batons.

Check batons for cracks or splinters.

Check safety of starting blocks if they are used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No track spikes.

No bare feet.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Designated areas for running must be clearly marked, away from other activities, checked for hazards, and provide safe footing and traction.

All tracks must be inspected annually and maintained as necessary.

“Blacktop” strips and open fields may be used if areas are suitable, smooth, clean, level and provide safe footing and traction.

Run-out areas must be in place for all running events.

School halls.

School stairways.

Where running takes place off school site for a warm up or conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.
  • Before initial use, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).
  • If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Indoor Running - Use of Hallways and Stairs

At turnaround or end points, designate a safety or slow down zone (e.g. using pylons).

Designate a safety zone (e.g. using pylons) for all doors that open out into the hall.

Where school hallways or stairways are used for fitness training, appropriate safety measures must be in place:

  • hallway protrusions must be clearly marked
  • inform appropriate staff members of times and locations of fitness training
  • no running to take place where showcases presents a hazard
  • hall double doors have to be secured open
  • monitors must be positioned at corners
  • floor surface must be dry and provide good footing
  • stairways must have a railing
  • students must be instructed on safety procedures for running stairs (e.g. one step at a time, blind spots, spatial awareness, using railings for balance, maintaining body control, respect for personal space)

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

The skills and techniques associated with running must be taught in a logical progression.

Proper warm-ups and cool-downs must be included in all in-class sessions.

Distance Running

The length of run must be modified to be appropriate to the age and ability level of the student. Also take into account:

  • temperature of the day
  • previous training and length of preparation

When running above distances in practice, students may be temporarily out of sight and must run in pairs or groups.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision for sprints, relays, hallway and stair running.

In the area supervision for 400m, 800m, 1500m and 3000m.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Triple Jump/Long Jump

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Rake

Shovel or spade

Keep rakes, shovel and spade away from pit and run-up area when not in use

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No spikes of any kind.

No bare feet.

No jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Where running takes place off school site for a warm up or conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Prior to initial use of route or course, teachers must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.
  • Before initial use, teachers must outline to students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution).
  • If route is off school property, determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Pits must be situated away from high traffic areas and other activity sites (e.g., ball diamonds).

Pit width minimum is 1.8m (6’) and long enough to accommodate the longest jumper in long jump. There must be a minimum of 0.5m (1’7”) between take-off board and front edge of pit.

In the case of the triple jump, determine that the take-off areas are at an appropriate distance from the pit to allow for a safe landing on the second phase (step).

Landing area must be soft and deep with no foreign objects.

Pit must be filled with sand to a minimum depth of 30cm (12”).

Dig pit at least once a season and after heavy rainfall.

Take-off area must be firm and flat and swept if ‘blacktop’.

Approach area must be smooth, traffic-free and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression, e.g., short five step approach and build up to 15-17 step approach.

Refrain from jumping if there are slippery conditions.

Establish a procedure to initiate jumping.

If students are rakers, they must be trained. As part of training, include rules such as:

  • remove rake before next competitor begins approach and hold rake prongs downward ;
  • begin raking after competitor is out of pit ;
  • rake sand into the middle, as opposed to out to the sides.

Keep rakes, shovels and spades away from the pit and run-up area when they are not in use.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial lessons.

On-site supervision after skills have been taught.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Tricycles

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Consult the Kindergarten/Primary Grades - Wheel Activities page.

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Tug of War

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Manila Hemp Tug of War rope or equivalent must be used:

  • minimum 32mm (11/4“) in diameter
  • minimum 33m (108’) length

Ropes must be regularly checked for splinters and severe wear.

Stopwatch.

Whistle.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Suitable footwear (e.g., flat-soled athletic shoes) and appropriate clothing.

No cleats.

No spikes.

No exposed jewellery.

No gloves allowed.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Outdoor grass area minimum 8m x 40m (26’ x 131’).

The pulling area must be a flat, level surface free of debris and water.

The playing area must be outlined with tug of war markings.

No indoor facilities can be used for tug of war. The exception is a commercial tug of war indoor facility.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Parents/guardians must be made aware of any off-campus activity and the means of transportation used.

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Tugging competitions must be based on skills that are taught.

Maximum number of participants on each team is 8.

Follow and enforce the rules in the official Tug of War rule book.

When selecting teams, consideration must be given to students’ age, weight, height, sex, fitness level and experience.

Students must participate in appropriate warm-up that includes aerobic warm-up and stretches.

Students must be informed to never wrap the rope around waist or wrist or pull it under/through clothing.

No knots or loops are to be made in the rope, nor must it be locked across any part of the body of any team member.

At the start of a pull, the rope must be taut with the centre rope marking over the centre line marking on the ground.

Every pulling member must hold the rope with the palms of both bare hands facing up.

The rope will pass between the body and the upper part of the arm.

For the end puller/anchor, the rope passes alongside the body, diagonally across the back and over the opposite shoulder from rear to front. The remaining rope passes under the armpit in a backward and outward direction and the slack runs free. The anchor then grips the standing part of the rope by the ordinary grip (e.g., the palms of both hands facing up, with both arms extended forward).

Inform students that there is the potential for rope burns.

To reduce the risk of rope burns:

  • grip the rope only hard enough to stop it from slipping
  • momentarily wiggle fingers without letting go of the rope
  • if arms tire, momentarily squeeze rope under armpit

Participants must be instructed in proper foot positioning and foot work.

Instruction must be given in the likelihood of a fall and in recovery techniques.

Maximum time for each pull is one minute.

Teachers must be aware of the weather forecast. Pulling must be cancelled in adverse conditions.

Allow teams sufficient time to physically recover after each pull (minimum of one to two minutes is required).

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Insect repellent and sunscreen must not be applied to palms of hands.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lighting Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision for team tug of war activities.

On-site supervision for initial instruction involving pairs.

The teacher/supervisor acts as:

  • referee
  • timer
  • overseer of activity to determine participants in distress and acts accordingly

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with tug of war techniques (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Supervision Ratios

1 referee: each pull

1 teacher per 16 students

One teacher/supervisor for each pull.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Ultimate Disc

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Disc must be appropriate for the level of ability of students and the wind conditions of the day, (e.g., soft [cloth] disc, heavy discs).

Discs must be inspected for cracks or spurs.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No cleats.

No exposed hanging jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Outdoor playing area must be inspected regularly for debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction as well as be well removed from traffic areas.

Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the participating students. Teacher must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Goal posts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8m (6 feet) high.

Indoors, keep gym free of hazards (e.g., tables, chairs, pianos).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught and wind conditions.

No intentional body contact.

The number of games played in one day must not present a safety concern.

Any exposed orthopedic apparatus, which presents a safety concern to other players, must be soft or padded.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

On-site supervision for initial instruction followed by in-the-area supervision (intermediate).

On-site supervision for primary, junior.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Volleyball - Beach

Elementary - Curricular 2017

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Poles must be safely stored when not in use.

Nets must have no frayed wires.

Ball must be appropriate for age and ability of students.

For portable systems with guide ropes, clearly identify ropes with markers (e.g., tape, pylons).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

No bare feet on sand courts unless they have been raked and inspected prior to use.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Beach or grass volleyball courts must provide safe footing and traction.

Beach volleyball courts must have sufficient depth of sand so that there are no bare or hard dirt surfaces.

Playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of obstacles.

No timber borders.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills that are taught.

Drills must be organized so as to minimize the risk of being hit with an errant ball.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

Students must be instructed in the safe and correct method of setting up and taking down of nets (e.g., standing on chair).

If using an antenna, the bottom must be flush with the net.

When poles are not padded, activities must be modified so that poles do not present a safety hazard.

Students must be made aware of boundary ropes if used.

Environmental Considerations

Before involving students in outdoor activity, teachers must take into consideration:

  • environmental conditions (temperature, weather, air quality, humidity, UV index, insects)
  • accessibility to adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) and student hydration before, during and after physical activity
  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must be made aware of ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, insect repellent, appropriate clothing).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to severe weather conditions (e.g., lightning, funnel clouds, severe winds, tornadoes [consult Appendix F - Lightning Protocol]).

Supervision

Constant visual supervision if students are setting up or putting away net poles.

On-site supervision.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Volleyball/Newcombe Ball

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Poles must be safely stored when not in use.

Nets must have no frayed wires.

Ball must be appropriate for age and ability of students.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No exposed jewellery.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction.

When volleyball poles are removed, floor plugs must be replaced.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (see Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Game activities must be based on skills that are taught.

Drills must be organized so as to minimize the risk of being hit with an errant ball.

Diving must not be included as part of an in-class program.

Activities/rules must be modified to the age and ability level of the participants.

Students must be instructed in the safe and correct method of setting up and taking down of nets (e.g., standing on chair).

Do not allow students to climb up the pole to attach net.

If using antennae, the bottom must be flush with the net.

When poles are not padded, activities must be modified so that poles don’t present a safety hazard.

When facility does not allow for safe play, (e.g., poles on sidelines adjacent to walls), modify rules appropriately.

Supervision

On-site supervision.

Constant visual supervision if students are setting up or putting away nets and poles.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Water Polo

Elementary - Curricular 2017

All pools are governed by the Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565.

Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Standard safety equipment as stated in pool regulations, (e.g., ring buoys, reaching poles, spinal boards, etc).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

No jewellery.

Long hair must be tied back.

Appropriate swimwear must be worn.

Facilities

Backyard pools must not be used.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

School or community swimming pool.

Pool deck must be kept clear of obstacles and excess water.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Games must be based on skills taught.

Teacher/supervisor must inform in-charge person on deck of any student with a medical history (e.g., diabetes, asthma, frequent ear infections) or any medical conditions that may affect the student’s safety in the water.

Before involving students in water polo, teachers must take into consideration:

  • previous training and fitness level
  • length of time and intensity of physical activity

Students must ask permission to leave pool area.

Fingernails must be closely trimmed.

Modify rules to accommodate age and ability of participants.

Students must adhere to the following rules:

  • no running or pushing on deck
  • no gum chewing
  • no food in pool area
  • stay clear of diving area
  • no diving into water less than 2.75m (9’) in depth
  • no shoes on deck

No pushing or holding anyone under water.

Showers must be taken before entering the pool.

Parents must be informed when students go off school property to a pool.

Parents must also be informed of the means of transportation used.

Emergency procedures must be outlined to students prior to entering the water.

Students with infected cuts or open sores must not be allowed in pool.

Water Polo instruction swim may include organized games, relays, etc., but CANNOT include an unorganized free swim

Swim Test

Prior to participating in water polo, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a qualified instructor/guard (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Students who do not pass the above swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not participate in water polo.

Guard/Instructor must be aware of swim test results.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

A teacher or other school supervisor must accompany pupils to the pool and be on deck or in the pool.

Close and frequent monitoring of change rooms must take place, but not by the lifeguard.

Each instructor can supervise only one class or group.

A person with current first aid certification must be accessible.

Supervision for Recreational Swims (Free Swim – No Instruction)

Teachers must accompany students to the pool and be on deck or in the pool during the recreational/free swim.

According to Ontario Public Pool Regulation 565, during a recreational/free swim, the only acceptable lifeguard certification is NL.

Instructor certification and OTAS do not meet the safety requirements of the regulation.

The minimum ratio of lifeguards (NL certified) to bathers on deck and in the pool is:

  • 2 lifeguards per 1-125 bathers. If the teacher is NL certified, he/she may act as one of the two lifeguards, and therefore a third person is not necessary.
  • 3 lifeguards per 126-250 bathers. If the teacher is NL certified, he/she may act as one of the three lifeguards, and therefore a fourth person is not necessary.

Note: a swimmer/bather is considered to be anyone within 1.8m (6’) from the water’s edge.

Lifeguard Qualifications

Lifeguard must hold a current National Lifeguard (NL) Certificate.

A teacher/supervisor who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with water polo techniques (e.g., no recent experience) must seek assistance from appropriate support staff and/or refrain from activity until instructional support is received.

Supervision for the Swim Test and Water Polo Instruction

There must be a minimum of two certified swim instructors on deck or in the pool certified as outlined below.

Supervision ratio is 2 instructors to 1-50 students, with both instructors certified as outlined below.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified instructor or lifeguard (NL) is required. The instructor requires the same certification as listed below.

Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test and the Water Polo Instruction

One instructor must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)
  • Standard First Aid Certificate (e.g., Red Cross, Lifesaving Society, St. John Ambulance, Canadian Ski Patrol)

All other instructors must hold one of the following current certifications:

  • Canadian Red Cross Water Safety Instructor Award
  • Lifesaving Society Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society Swim Instructor Certificate plus an Assistant Lifeguard Certificate
  • YMCA Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only
  • National Lifeguard Certificate (NL)

Verified copies of certification must be available in the pool area.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Wrestling

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Wrestling mats being used need to be mats manufactured and approved by the manufacturer for wrestling, and be in good repair.

Determine that mats are not damaged to the point where the mat is compromised (e.g. large pieces of foam missing).

Utility or add-a-mat systems may be used. Determine that mats and joining systems are in good condition.

No gaps between mats.

Wrestlers with orthodontic devices must wear appropriate mouth protection.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No jewellery.

Bare feet or wrestling shoes (no sharp edges, lace tips on shoes).

Glasses not to be worn.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Mat surfaces must be checked regularly for irregularities and be clean.

Allow suitable clearance from the edge of wrestling area to surrounding walls.

Surrounding walls must be padded if clearance from mat surface is less than 2m (6’6”).

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult the Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Matches must be based on skills that are taught.

Students must wrestle with partners of similar weight, strength and ability.

Warm-up activities must emphasize conditioning and flexibility.

Rules and illegal moves must be outlined.

Students must not act as referees.

Maximum total time limit of 3 minutes per round.

Match length/format may be shortened if desired.

Ground or ‘par terre’ and standing wrestling permitted.

No throws.

Make students aware of the importance of keeping fingernails and toenails closely trimmed.

All infections, burns and open cuts must be covered.

Students with communicable skin conditions must not participate in contact wrestling (e.g., impetigo).

Resources can be found at the Ontario Amateur Wrestling Association.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Constant visual supervision is required during initial instruction of techniques for holds and releases.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with wrestling (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Resources can be found at the Ontario Amateur Wrestling Association.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.

Yoga and Pilates

Elementary - Curricular 2017

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use.

Mats:

  • Regularly check mats for wear and tears.
  • Mats must be non-slip.
  • Mats suitable for Yoga/Pilates must be used.

Fitness equipment used in Yoga/Pilates activities must be appropriate to the size and weight of the student and checked that it is safe for use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Suitable gym clothing so that student can move unrestricted on mats.

Appropriate footwear must be worn (e.g., non-slip socks, gymnastic slippers) or bare feet.

Tie back long hair.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use.

Exercise space and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and provide safe footing and traction.

Limit activities on stages to those that are stationary.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation (consult Generic Section).

Prior to participation students must receive training or information on concussion prevention and awareness specific to the activity, information on the possible risks of the activity and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must not participate in the activity until these instructions have been received.

Skills must be taught in proper progression.

Activities/routines must be based on skills that are taught.

For the type of Yoga to be taught and practiced in class (e.g. from the gentle form of Viniyoga and Kripaul to the more vigourous Ashtanga and Power Yoga) the teacher/instructor must take into consideration the following:

  • Fitness and flexibility levels of the students in the class
  • Past experience the class has had with Yoga – Pilates
  • Teacher’s/instructors knowledge/experience/ability/certification to teach the various forms of Yoga and know the potential risks involved and how to minimize those risks.

Bikram Yoga or Hot Yoga where the facility is heated from 95 to 102 degrees must not be done as a curricular activity.

Bikram, Ashtanga and Power Yoga are generally too vigorous for beginners and inflexible people.

Students must be instructed not to attempt:

  • headstands
  • plow
  • crow
  • full shoulder stands
  • full lotus

Resistance training for the development of endurance can be done emphasizing high repetitions and/or low weights.

Where equipment is being used, (e.g., resistance-rings, stability balls, foam rollers) students must be instructed in and demonstrate competency in the proper use of the equipment before using it independently.

Stress correct body alignment for injury prevention.

Permit students to work at personal levels.

A process must be in place to regularly disinfect equipment.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

A teacher who is providing instruction and is unfamiliar with yoga or Pilates (e.g. no recent experience) must refrain from teaching the activity until assistance is provided by an appropriately trained staff or training is received.

Note: Intramural/Club situations require teacher supervision.

First Aid and Emergency Action Plan

Follow the school’s emergency action plan including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan).

Also see Generic Section to view complete safety requirements.