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Secondary - Interschool

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Alpine Skiing/Snowboarding

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Consult OFSAA Playing Regulations for Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding.

For more information, consult OSBIE/OSRA’s School Board/Snow Resort Safety Guidelines for Out of school Trips for Winter Sports Education Program.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Athletes must check all equipment prior to use and report concerns to coach.

Alpine skiing: In practice and competition, athletes must wear: a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn hard shell crash helmets (designed for Giant Slalom alpine ski racing) which provide complete head protection (front and back) and full ear protection. Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS) approved slalom helmets with a chin guard attached to the helmet and bearing the following certification codes (ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, or Snell S98)

Snowboarding: In practice and competition, athletes must wear: a properly fittied (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell S98) for snowboarding

Parents/guardians must be informed:

  • that their child/ward must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards organization (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell S98) as appropriate for skiing/snowblading or snowboarding;
  • that when their child/ward uses their own personal equipment or borrows equipment:
    • of the importance of instructing their child/ward on how to wear their helmet properly
    • an equipment inspection by a knowledgeable equipment technician must take place prior to the activity to ensure:
      • skis, snowboards and poles are appropriate for the size and ability of the student;
      • all bindings are in working order and set to the proper tension,
      • all bindings meet current approved guidelines; and
      • boots and bindings are compatible.

When renting equipment, the facility operator must provide:

  • boards, skis, and poles appropriate for the size and ability of the athlete;
  • boards and skis with edges and bases must be in good condition;
  • an inspection and adjustment of boots and bindings by a knowledgeable equipment technician on-site;
  • snow sport helmets that are in good condition and are certified by a recognized safety standards organization (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell RS 98);
  • a check that rental helmets are properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn.

There must be a functioning, reliable communication system covering the course.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for outdoor activity must be worn (e.g. use layering principles, hats, mitts or gloves). (“Comfort Tips” guidelines from the Ontario Snow Resorts Association can assist skiers/snowboarders in determining appropriate clothing for a comfortable outdoor snow sport activity.)

No long scarves permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

Long hair must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Only commercially operated ski facilities with suitable teaching areas must be used.

The facility provider must define skiing area to the students so they are aware of the boundaries and hazards for the activity.

Course poles must be full-length breakaway style, and in good repair.

Race course must be set by experienced, qualified course-setter.

Course must be away from dangerous obstacles.

Safety walls, nets or barriers must be placed where required.

There must be a clear run-out at the end of the course.

When running takes place off school site for a conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission. Parents/guardians must also be informed of the importance of sun protection.

Also consult “Parent/Guardian must be informed” in the Equipment section.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Proper racing techniques must be taught prior to competition.

Athletes must be taught the importance of skiing/snowboarding in control at all times.

Athletes must ski/snowboard in areas identified as appropriate by the qualified instructor.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Prior to the competitions review the following with athletes:

  • A properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn snow sport helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. ASTM F2040, CEN 1077, Snell S98) as appropriate for skiing/snowblading or snowboarding must be worn.
  • Ways to protect themselves from environmental conditions (e.g. use of hats, sunscreen, sunglasses, personal water bottles, appropriate clothing).
  • Safety procedures related to cold weather conditions (e.g., temperature, wind chill) and methods for preventing frost bite and hypothermia.
  • Selection of proper clothing for the weather of the day
  • The Alpine Responsibility Code
  • Lift use guidelines

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • snow conditions (e.g. snow/ice storms) and visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. frostbite, hypothermia).

The school board’s weather procedures are the minimum standards at all times. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Certified Alpine Officials must preside over all racing competitions.

Members of a recognized ski patrol must patrol the area and be present on the course when a race is in progress.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one alpine skiing coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Instruction Coach – Entry Level Course
  • NCCP Competition – Development Level Course
  • Completion of alpine skiing NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past.
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Alpine Skiing Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in alpine skiing having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

At least one snowboarding coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Introduction Snowboarding Course
  • Completion of snowboarding NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past.
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Snow Boarding Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in snowboarding having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Archery

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Arm guards and finger tabs must be made available to athletes.

Bow length and weight must correspond to the height and strength of the participant.

An equal number of appropriate size and length arrows must be given to each participant.

Appropriate targets must be:

  • a minimum of 10cm (4”) of .9kg (2lb) density ethafoam pieces, or equivalent
  • 1.2m x 1.2m (4’ x 4’) in size target face
  • 60cm (24”) target faces for recurve bow

Compound bows are acceptable when target butts are able to stop compound shot arrows.

Where compound bows are used, targets must meet the following minimum requirements:

  • 30–35cm (12-14”) deep bin/box of rags, plastic bags, stretch wrap, window screening, etc., which is inside the box and packed tightly
  • 5cm (2”) density of 2lb ethafoam or equivalent on the front
  • 40cm (16”) target face for compound bow
  • 60cm (24”) target faces for recurve bow

Where possible, store ethafoam target butts out of direct sunlight.

No crossbows.

Floor, back or side quivers must be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No loose fitting clothing on the upper body permitted. No sandals permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

Long hair must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Areas must be free of obstructions and hazards.

For indoor shooting, a properly installed safety net must be used.

Access/exit to the facility must be controlled, and warning sign posted.

For outdoor activity, the shooting area must be well marked and controlled.

If an outdoor facility does not have a safety net or controlled natural safety barrier (e.g., hill), then an overshoot area must be established, well marked and controlled.

Archery equipment must be stored in two separate storage areas.

Arrows in one separate secured area, bows in another separate secured area.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The competitions must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Establish a “Start” and “Stop” shooting and retrieving system.

Establish an emergency procedure including whistle system.

Prior to initial shooting, Athletes must receive instruction on:

  • safety and emergency procedures
  • whistle system
  • shooting techniques
  • care and use of equipment
  • how to remove an arrow from a target butt safely

“Shooting” line must be established, appropriate for the skill level of the students.

Sufficient spacing must be provided for each athlete on the “shooting” line.

No one in front of shooting line.

All athletes not involved in shooting must be positioned well behind the shooting line and away from the archers on the line.

Athletes must be instructed that a loaded bow must never be pointed at anyone.

Bows must only be loaded on the shooting line, after the signal to shoot has been given.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the facility, skills and teaching strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one archery coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Introduction Coach Course
  • Completion of archery NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Archery Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in archery, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Badminton

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for breakage and to determine proper grip.

Protective eye gear meeting ASTM F803-standard or equivalent must be worn by all (singles and doubles) for competition and all practice situations.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

When teaching/practicing skills, adequate spacing must be allowed for each athlete to be able to make an uninterrupted swing.

Players must stop play whenever a foreign object comes onto the court.

Encourage front court player to avoid facing partner during a rally.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required during initial instruction.

In-the-area supervision is required after initial instruction.

Setting up of equipment requires on-site supervision.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Baseball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Hardball

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Wooden bats must not be cracked. All bats must have a proper grip.

The bats and gloves must comply with the current Baseball Ontario rules.

The batter, on-deck batter, bat person, base runners and base coaches (located behind first and third bases) must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn batting helmet with flaps, covering both ears and certified by a recognized safety standards association.

The catchers must wear all of the equipment specified under Baseball Ontario rules (i.e., all catchers are required to wear a mask with throat protector, a helmet, a chest protector, shin guards, a cup and a cup-type supporter).

The warm-up catchers must wear a mask with throat protection.

Suitable protection for the pelvic area must be worn by all the players.

All of the equipment not being used must be kept out of the playing/practice area.

The bases must be properly secured.

Where pitching machines are being used, they must be inspected prior to use and be under the direct supervision of a teacher/coach.

Student umpires must wear a mask and chest pad when positioned behind home plate.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Baseball Ontario approved footwear (e.g. metal cleats, molded cleats) may be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Diamond must be level and groomed.

Practice fields must be level, and away from traffic and other activities.

There must be sufficient turf for safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

If, in the opinion of the umpire, after consultation with both coaches, the field is deemed to be unsafe for play, the game must be rescheduled.

Entrance gates to the playing field must be closed at all times.

Dugouts and/or players’ benches must be screened to protect players.

Prior to use, backstops, fences and fields must be checked for hazards. Any hazards found must be reported to students and appropriate officials.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Before sliding is permitted, appropriate sliding techniques must be taught to minimize the risk of injury.

Warm ups and drills (e.g., hitting, throwing, stretching) must each be in a dedicated area so that one activity does not present a hazard to another.

Players must be taught to drop or lay the bat down after hitting, not release it during the follow-through of the swing.

Inform the athletes about the importance of keeping their eyes on the flight of the ball when playing offense (e.g., running bases) and when playing defense (e.g., pitcher, infielders and outfielders).

Pitchers are limited to the Baseball Ontario limits.

Players not involved in the game must be in dugout or behind players’ benches.

When practicing indoors with a regulation bat:

  • use a batting cage
  • use a pitching machine in a confined area free from student traffic or use a pitcher behind a protective cage or batters hit off a tee (in each case batters hit into a cage)
  • All non active players must be behind cage, no fielders allowed

The location of spectators must not present a safety concern.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Basketball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Portable basketball systems must be internally weighted to prevent tipping or movement.

Set up/movement of portable basketball systems must be done by a trained adult.

The height of an adjustable basket must not present a safety concern.

Protective Padding:

In situations where student athlete’s follow-through could result in contact with a wall and/or stage, protective gym mats or padding must be placed beyond the “key” area and must extend a minimum of 1.8m (6’) up the wall from the top of the baseboard (minimum width of 4.8m (16’)). Protective mats or padding must have a minimum thickness of 5cm (2"). For example :

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2”)
  • open-cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Where a stage is close to the baseline, gym mats must be placed over edge of stage and extend close to the floor.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery, wrist bands and hard hair accessories is not permitted.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Protective padding must be used on rectangular backboard lower edges and corners.

Winch for moving backboards up and down must not be located directly under the supporting wall- mounted structure.

Only athletes who have been trained and who are under constant visual supervision may raise and lower baskets using hand winch.

Only trained adults can use motorized winches to raise and lower the baskets.

When raising or lowering baskets, the trained person operating the winch must be able to see that the area under the basket is clear.

Floor sockets must have cover plates.

If, in the opinion of the referee, after consultation with both coaches, is that the facility is deemed to be unsafe for play, the game must not be played or must be rescheduled.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

If facility does not allow for safe cross-court play (e.g., doors and radiators under baskets, wall close to the baseline, or side baskets attached to walls), modify rules appropriately (e.g., no lay-ups).

No hanging from rims on portable basketball systems.

The base for portable basketball systems must not be on the court.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision for initial instruction.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Bowling/Lawn Bowling/Bocce Ball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn.

Proper shoes must be worn at all times, as provided or approved by the facility.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction (e.g., public bowling alleys, lawn bowling field, school facilities).

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Non-active participants must be behind bowler(s) at all times and not in field of play.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the game, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Broomball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Ice
Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Broomball sticks (regulation or otherwise) must be appropriate for size of the athlete. Check for cracks/splinters.

Broomball nets, hockey nets or pylons for goals.

Foam ball, utility ball or regulation broomball.

Goalie and player equipment:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full cage
  • gloves (e.g., broomball, hockey)
  • shin pads (e.g., broomball, hockey)
  • Jock or Jill protector
  • elbow pads

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Broomball played on fields, blacktop, or on rinks, requires player to wear suitable clothing for weather conditions. Broomball shoes are mandatory on ice.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Broomball - Non-Ice (e.g., practices)

“Blacktop” area must not be obstructed (e.g., tetherball poles, tennis standards, or basketball standards).

Field must be free from ice patches.

Broomball - Ice

Ice surface must be free from obstacles.

Before playing broomball on an outdoor ice surface (e.g., lake, pond), contact local authorities to determine, with absolute certainty, that the ice is thick enough to be safe for activity.

Natural Ice Locations (Lakes, Ponds, Rivers)

Only Board/school approved natural ice locations must be used.

An approved natural ice location is one that is monitored and tested by a recognized organization (e.g., local municipality, police, and snowmobile clubs) and/or a recognized knowledgeable individual (e.g., winter camp supervisor) that measures ice thickness for activity safety.

Prior to an activity on natural ice surface the teacher/supervisor must contact local authorities to determine with absolute certainty that the ice surface is thick enough to be safe. The ice thickness must be a minimum of 15cm (6") and must be measured in several places.

The use of natural ice involves some risk. Here are safety criteria minimize the risks:

  • Stay off the ice of any natural ice surface where conditions cannot be measured.
  • Stay away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, avoid traveling on ice at night unless necessary
  • Obey all ice warning signs.
  • The teacher/supervisor must be in close proximity to students on the ice surface.
  • The teachers/supervisors must be knowledgeable of the procedures to follow for rescuing an individual who has fallen through the ice.
  • Students must be informed on ice safety and ice rescue procedures prior to the activity (e.g., not to go on the ice surface alone).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced. Penalties for stick infractions must be strictly enforced. No body contact or stick-on-body contact.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • snow conditions (e.g. snow/ice storms) and visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. frostbite, hypothermia).

The school board’s weather procedures are the minimum standards at all times. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one broomball coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Broomball for fun Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – BTC Coach Course
  • Completion of broomball NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Broomball Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in broomball, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Cheerleading - Acrobatic

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

For Cheerleading – Spirit/Dance, consult the page in the intramural module.

Also consult the Gymnastics - General Procedures page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Only use cross-link polyethylene foam cheer mats, 1 ¾’’ – 2’’ in thickness.

Mats must:

  • offer proper foot control and a safe surface;
  • not move;
  • be aligned so separation does not occur;
  • be regularly checked for wear and tears.

Velcro connections on Velcro mats must be kept clean to provide maximum adhesion.

Megaphone handles must be screwed in tightly, and burred edges must be trimmed or filed.

The use of mini-trampolines, springboards or any other height-increasing apparatus is prohibited for competition or performance. These devices may be used for skill development and practice under the supervision of a coach trained in their use.

Only the following props are allowed:

  • flags
  • banners
  • signs
  • pom-poms
  • megaphones

Props with poles or similar support apparatus may not be used in conjunction with any stunt or tumbling.

All props must be safely cleared from the competition floor when not in use.

Any electrical equipment used must be in good working order and have wires taped to the floor or contained within walls.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn (e.g., standard cheerleading uniforms - tops, bottoms, socks and shoes). Soft-soled shoes must be worn (e.g., aerobic-type running shoe with proper ankle and arch support and a simple tread). Jazz shoes, boots and gymnastics slippers are not allowed.

No hats or sunglasses permitted.

No jewellery permitted.

Length and style of hair must not hinder vision or the progress of stunts.

Outdoors

Heavier sweatshirts and/or wind suits must be fitted.

No gloves or mitts permitted while stunting.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Activity surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Hardwood gym floor, rubberized gym floor, spring-assisted floor, carpeted studio, grass – track surfaces [all-weather]) must be dry, flat and free of loose objects and obstacles, clothing, towels, and water bottles.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Stunt cheerleading is not permitted on gravel or other loose surfaces, concrete, terrazzo or ice surfaces, or a school stage.

Ground bound cheerleading is permitted on gravel or other loose surfaces, concrete and terrazzo surfaces.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Competitions and Practices

The floor must be marked so that perimeter and centre are highly visible.

A safe, matted practice area must be provided for warm-ups.

The ceiling height and above-head obstructions in performance area must not present a safety concern.

A floor manager must be present to control warm-ups.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Any student with a playing cast must provide a doctor’s note or parent/guardian signed permission indicating it is safe for him/her to participate.

Supports, braces and soft casts which are unaltered from the manufacturer’s original design/production do not require any additional padding. Supports/braces that have been altered from the manufacturer’s original design/production must be padded with a closed-cell, slow-recovery foam padding no less than one-half inch thick if the participant is involved in partner stunts, pyramids or tosses. A participant wearing a plaster cast or a walking boot must not be involved in partner stunts, pyramids or tosses.

An exposed orthopaedic apparatus must be soft or padded and must be approved by the person in charge prior to the commencement of the activity.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included. Mats must be used during practice and competition warm-ups.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Strength and conditioning must be an integral part of the training of acrobatic cheerleaders.

Coaches must recognize a squad’s particular ability level and must limit the squad’s activities accordingly. “Ability level” refers to the squad’s talents as a whole and individuals must not be pressed to perform activities until safely perfected.

Athletes must not perform skills beyond their ability level until the requisite precursor skills are mastered.

All cheerleaders must receive appropriate training before attempting any form of cheerleading gymnastics (tumbling, partner stunts, pyramids and jumps).

Safety and spotting skills must be addressed first.

Appropriate spotting must be used until athletes demonstrate mastery of the skill.

Drops, including but not limited to knee, seat, thigh, front, back and split drops from a jump, stunt, or inverted position onto the performing surface, are prohibited unless the majority of the weight is first borne on the hands/feet, which break the impact of the drop.

When discarding props (signs, etc.) that are made of solid material or have sharp edges/corners, team members must gently toss or place the props so that they are under control.

Tops and bases of the pyramid must learn the responsibilities of other members in spotting/catching.

Mascots may be incorporated into the routine safely but must not be included in stunts and pyramids or as spotters or catchers.

In adverse weather conditions no stunts, pyramid or tumbling are allowed.

Refer to the 2017-18 AACCA School Cheer Safety Rules for a glossary of terms for acrobatic cheerleading along with safety requirements for the following performance elements:

  • Partner Stunts
  • Inversions
  • Pyramids
  • Tosses
  • Tumbling and Jumps

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Practices and Performances

The following skills are only allowed on a mat, grass or rubberized track surface:

  • Basket tosses, elevator/sponge tosses and other similar multi-based tosses.
  • Partner stunts in which the base uses only one arm to support the top person.
  • Twisting tumbling skills (Arabians, full twisting layouts, etc.). The exception to this rule is the following: cartwheels, roundoffs and aerial cartwheels are allowed on surfaces other than a mat, grass or rubberized track.

Taken from the 2015-16 School Cheerleading Safety Rules of the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches and Administrators.

Refer to Ontario Cheerleading Federation policies and procedures for safety rules with regard to Tumbling, Stunts/Pyramids and other recognized competitive groupings.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for the initial skill learning stages.

After the initial instruction, on-site supervision is required.

Coaches must employ hands-on spotting at all times, until skills are mastered.

All team members must be trained to employ hands-on spotting at all times for all skills, until they are mastered.

Coaches must secure a safe cheering environment (e.g., keep fans away from team space at games).

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of acrobatic cheerleading skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

All Cheerleading – Acrobatic coaches must possess one of the following qualifications:

  • Trained in the American Association of Cheerleading Coaches Administrators (AACCA) Spirit Safety Certification (online course or in person), every four (4) years.
  • Trained and certified in an International Cheer Union (ICU) coaches course discipline, every three (3) years.
  • Attendance at a cheerleading clinic or workshop, provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity and where safety is addressed, within the last three years that is recognized by the Ontario Cheerleading Federation.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in acrobatic cheerleading, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

Teams incorporating any and all tumbling elements in a routine (for practice and competitions) must be fully trained and supervised by a gymnastics coach with one of the following qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport coach – Gymnastics Foundations Course
  • Certified in the ICU Global Coaching Techniques (GCT) and ICU Rules Comprehension Course at a level determined by the skill incorporated, every four (4) years.
  • Completion of gymnastic NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Gymnastics Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in gymnastics, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Cheerleading - Spirit/Dance

Secondary - Interschool 2018

For the Cheerleading – Spirit Dance activity pages please refer to the Intramural module.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Cricket

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Regulation cricket bats, stumps and balls.

Approved cricket pads and gloves must be worn by batters and wicketkeeper.

Batter must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn cricket helmet that is certified by a recognized safety standards association.

A softer ball must be used for indoor cricket drills and games.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., running shoes).

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface must be a mat wicket.

Outdoor field must be free from debris and obstructions and provide safe footing and traction.

For indoor cricket variations, playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., table, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Bouncers and bean balls must not be bowled.

A designated area must be established for non-active players at a safe distance behind the batter.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Cross Country Running/Orienteering

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No bare feet permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Prior to the Initial Use of the Route

The coach or convenor must do a safety check “walk through” in order to identify potential hazards and severely uneven surfaces which must be brought to the attention of the officials and athletes.

The coaches must outline the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) to athletes.

If the cross-country route or orienteering course is on grass and/or in a wooded area, coaches or convener must do a safety check “walk through” after a substantial rainfall and/or windstorm, in order to identify potential hazards.

If the route has been affected by weather conditions and degradations of the course occur during competition, ongoing safety assessments must be conducted by coach or convener, and the route changed if necessary.

Competition Route

The competition route must have marshals stationed throughout, all hazards well marked, gate and funnel markers set to enhance safety.

Start and finish area must provide a wide flat surface.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Coaches must be aware of athlete’s allergies (e.g., bees).

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Athletes must be instructed in basic road safety.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The length and difficulty of the route must be appropriate to the age and ability level of the participants.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Coaches must monitor weekly distance increases of student athletes.

The number of participants in any one event must not present a safety concern.

Athletes must be coached in strategies that enhance safety with “crowded” starts.

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players) may be used.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Off-Site Orienteering Ratio

1 supervisor per 30 athletes

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Cross Country Skiing

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Skis, boots and poles must be in good repair and appropriate size for skiers.

When their athletes use their own personal equipment or borrows equipment their parents/guardians must be informed:

  • of the importance of an equipment inspection prior to the activity to ensure.
  • that skis and poles are appropriate for the size and ability of the athlete;
  • that all bindings are in working order and set to the proper tension;
  • that all bindings meet current approved guidelines; and
  • that boots and bindings are compatible.

When equipment is provided by the school/board or rented from a commercial facility, the following must be provided:

  • Skis and poles appropriate for the size and ability of the athlete.
  • Skis with edges in good condition.
  • Boots and bindings that are compatible.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear for outdoor activity must be worn (e.g. use layering principles, hats, mitts or gloves). (Comfort Tips guidelines from the Ontario Snow Resorts Association can assist skiers in determining appropriate clothing for a comfortable outdoor snow sport activity.)

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Prior to initial use of the trail, coach or convenor must do a safety check “ski through” in order to identify potential hazards which must be brought to the attention of the coaches, convenor, athletes and officials.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

In practices, define specific routes to the athletes so they are aware of the boundaries.

When choosing a site the following conditions must be taken into consideration: sun, wind and snow conditions as well as suitability of terrain.

When selecting a non-commercial site the facility must have:

  • practice tracks skied in by the coach/ convenor or competent student skiers under coach/convenor direction for traditional event
  • proximity to warmth, food, waxing and other facilities

The competition route must have marshals stationed throughout, and all hazards must be well marked or padded.

Trails must be clearly marked, intersections must be roped off for trails not in use, and turns must be wide and safe.

When running takes place off school site for a conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Natural Ice Locations (Lakes, Ponds, Rivers)

Only Board/school approved natural ice locations must be used.

An approved natural ice location is one that is monitored and tested by a recognized organization (e.g., local municipality, police, and snowmobile clubs) and/or a recognized knowledgeable individual (e.g., winter camp supervisor) that measures ice thickness for activity safety.

Prior to an activity on natural ice surface the teacher/supervisor must contact local authorities to determine with absolute certainty that the ice surface is thick enough to be safe. The ice thickness must be a minimum of 15cm (6") and must be measured in several places.

The use of natural ice involves some risk. Here are safety criteria minimize the risks:

  • Stay off the ice of any natural ice surface where conditions cannot be measured.
  • Stay away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, avoid traveling on ice at night unless necessary
  • Obey all ice warning signs.
  • The teacher/supervisor must be in close proximity to students on the ice surface.
  • The teachers/supervisors must be knowledgeable of the procedures to follow for rescuing an individual who has fallen through the ice.
  • Students must be informed on ice safety and ice rescue procedures prior to the activity (e.g., not to go on the ice surface alone).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Emergency procedures must be established and communicated to the students.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Coaches must determine that competitors are adequately prepared and all equipment is suitable for the difficulty of the race and practice courses.

Coach basic uphill and downhill manoeuvres on a very gentle slope.

Instruct athletes to check that boots are secure in bindings.

Use a buddy system for practice.

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Review with students safety precautions to take when working close to others with their sharp-tip poles.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • snow conditions (e.g. snow/ice storms) and visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. frostbite, hypothermia).

The school board’s weather procedures are the minimum standards at all times. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Coaches, marshals and participants must be watchful for frostbite and hypothermia.

Consult sport regulations regarding minimum and maximum temperatures.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required for all sites.

Duties of supervisors must be clearly outlined.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Curling

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Equipment rules mandated by the curling club must be followed.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

Curling shoes with a removable gripper on sliding shoe, or shoes with a removable slider, or the sliding shoe taped.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Curling rink.

Curling surface must be free of obstacles and hazardous cracks.

When running takes place off school site for a conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Natural Ice Locations (Lakes, Ponds, Rivers)

Only Board/school approved natural ice locations must be used.

An approved natural ice location is one that is monitored and tested by a recognized organization (e.g., local municipality, police, and snowmobile clubs) and/or a recognized knowledgeable individual (e.g., winter camp supervisor) that measures ice thickness for activity safety.

Prior to an activity on natural ice surface the teacher/supervisor must contact local authorities to determine with absolute certainty that the ice surface is thick enough to be safe. The ice thickness must be a minimum of 15cm (6") and must be measured in several places.

The use of natural ice involves some risk. Here are safety criteria minimize the risks:

  • Stay off the ice of any natural ice surface where conditions cannot be measured.
  • Stay away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, avoid traveling on ice at night unless necessary
  • Obey all ice warning signs.
  • The teacher/supervisor must be in close proximity to students on the ice surface.
  • The teachers/supervisors must be knowledgeable of the procedures to follow for rescuing an individual who has fallen through the ice.
  • Students must be informed on ice safety and ice rescue procedures prior to the activity (e.g., not to go on the ice surface alone).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Off ice instruction, including safety rules must precede on ice instruction.

All curlers must be instructed not to step over the curling rocks, but to walk around them.

Athletes must be instructed that, unless in the action of shooting, curling rocks should never be picked up off the ice.

Establish safe routines to clear rocks from the house.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • snow conditions (e.g. snow/ice storms) and visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. frostbite, hypothermia).

The school board’s weather procedures are the minimum standards at all times. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Cycling

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Cycling takes place on paved surfaces (e.g., sidewalks, bike paths, roads).

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Athletes must do a safety inspection of bicycle before each use.

A properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn bicycle helmet that is certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. CSA, CSPC, ASTM, Snell, BSI, AS) must be worn.

One rider to carry a bicycle tool kit and pump during practice.

Coach to carry a first aid kit and signaling device (e.g., whistle).

Protective eyewear (e.g., sunglasses must be worn).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No open toed shoes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Choose routes carefully in terms of the length, road surface, frequency of traffic, complexity of intersections and railway crossings.

Prior to initial use of route, coach/convenor must do a safety ride through to verify safety and suitability.

Provide athletes with map and/or clear directions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

When running takes place off school site for a conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Athletes must be made aware of emergency procedures.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

The rules of the Highway Traffic Act and local bylaws must be reviewed and followed.

An initial riding pre-test (safety emphasized) must be passed before leaving school property (e.g., competency in stopping, changing gears, turning and passing).

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Instruction must be given on the proper position of the bicycle helmet.

A record of athletes, and the route taken, must be left in the school with an appropriate person.

Use the buddy system during practice.

Excursions/competitions must take place in daylight hours.

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players) may be used.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one cycling coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Let’s Ride! Community Cycling Initiation Course
  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Let’s Ride! Basic Cycling Skills
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Ready to Race! Training Basics Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Ready to Race! Skills and Tactics Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Ready to Race! Training to Race Course
  • Completion of cycling NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Cycling Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in cycling, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Diving

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Springboard/Tower
Higher Risk Activity

All pools are governed by the Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565.

Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D – Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Must have accessibility to standard safety equipment as stated in Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate swimming attire must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Backyard pools must not be used.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Determine that board and adjustable fulcrum are in good working order.

Water depths must conform to Diving Plongeon Canada regulations.

Springboard must be clean and not slippery.

Diving stands must be free of vibrations and bolted soundly.

Hinges must be checked, and bushings replaced if necessary.

Fulcrum must be adjusted and lubricated, and must move entire length of limit range.

Board must be level.

Height must conform to 1m (3’3") or 3m (10’) above the surface of the water +/- 2cm.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Emergency procedures must be outlined to student athletes.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Student athletes must adhere to the following rules:

  • only one person must use the board at one time
  • move towards the edge of the pool after a dive, as established by the instructor
  • no running or pushing on deck
  • make sure diving area is clear before proceeding to dive
  • no diving off deck into water less than 2.8m (9’) in depth
  • no chewing gum
  • no wearing goggles
  • no earplugs
  • no shoes on deck

Implement strategies to increase confidence and enhance safety (e.g., wearing a t-shirt when learning new dives, functioning bubble jets).

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Swim Test for Water Activities

Prior to practicing or competing in diving, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a certified aquatic instructor (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Results of the swim test must be documented and communicated as per school board policy (e.g., to the student, teacher, principal, parents/guardians, trip guide(s), lifeguards, aquatic instructor, and outside provider [if applicable]).

Student athletes who do not pass the above swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not compete.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required by the coach.

Constant visual supervision is required by diving instructor for initial instruction of each dive by each diver.

Close and frequent monitoring of change rooms must take place, but not by lifeguards.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one diving coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • Completion of diving NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Completion of diving NCCP Competition-Introduction or Instruction-Beginners course
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in diving - springboard/tower, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

Completion of Instruction – Beginners or Competition-Introduction Coach training is required for teaching any diving skills beyond a front dive.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test for Water Activities

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Lifeguard Qualifications

An individual over the age of 18 (e.g. teacher, instructor, trip guide, volunteer) must have a current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) lifeguard certificate issued by one of the following organizations:

  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard – Pool;
  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard;
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Supervision Ratios for the Swim Test for Water Activities

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

Supervision Ratios for Instructional Time

1 qualified diving instructor per 1-12 athletes plus 1 certified lifeguard per 1-30 athletes.

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Dragon Boat

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

This activity page must be presented to the provider prior to activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D – Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible on the safety boat or dragon boat.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Paddles and boats must be checked to assess that:

  • there are no splinters or cracks
  • the head, tail, drum, drummer’s seat, and steering oar are securely fitted
  • the boat is not leaking and bailers are in it
  • the centre seat is in place if it is a split boat
  • the buoyancy compartments are functional and sufficient to create positive buoyancy
  • the boat meets Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide requirements for small crafts.

1 audible alarm signal (e.g., whistle, air horn) must be carried by the helm (boat steersperson).

A safety boat must be equipped with a bull horn/megaphone.

A correctly fitting properly fastened and Canadian approved lifejacket/PFD must be worn at all times during dragon boating.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Student athletes must wear clothing and securely fastened foot protection appropriate for open-water dragon-boat racing. A dry change of clothes must be available on shore.

Coaches are required to wear PFDs while on the water at all times.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Glasses, if worn, must have a safety strap.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Water and weather conditions must be appropriate for the skill level of the group.

Controlled Area

A confined location, such as a pool, lakefront, or slow-moving river must be available for the teaching of basic stroke skills.

Head coach is familiar with site and/or site is commonly used for dragon boat racing.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Steersperson

Every boat requires a qualified steersperson.

Steersperson may sit or stand while steering.

Steersperson is the in-charge person outranking all persons in the boat.

Steersperson for each boat must demonstrate the following knowledge and skills:

  • steersperson must read and understand the Transport Canada's Boating Guide
  • be able to manage the team and exercise authority over team members
  • load the boat
  • balance the boat
  • maintain a straight course at full racing speed with a full crew of 18-20 paddlers plus drummer
  • steer a figure eight course around two buoys at normal speed with a full crew, in both directions, or in the absence of buoys, steer a set course which includes both left- and right-angled turns
  • execute sideways maneuvers without going forwards
  • turn the boat through 360 degrees in both directions without the use of paddlers
  • guide the boat forward in a straight line without the use of paddlers
  • guide the boat in reverse for 50m (164’) with the use of paddlers
  • execute an emergency stop (from racing speed to full stop)
  • execute safe approaches to a jetty/pontoon/dock in still and windy conditions
  • manage the unloading of the team members
  • secure the boat and determine that gear is put away correctly

Swim Test for Watercraft

Prior to dragon boating, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a certified aquatic instructor (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Results of the swim test must be documented and communicated as per school board policy (e.g., to the student, teacher, principal, parents/guardians, trip guide(s), lifeguards, aquatic instructor, and outside provider [if applicable]).

Students who do not pass the swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not dragon boat.

Safety Procedures

Athletes must be informed of available safety equipment and how to use it.

Before the start of each practice session, inform someone (facilities staff member) of the beginning and ending time on water.

Should the team require assistance at any time during the practice session, the drummer or steersperson must raise his/her hands, accompanied by a series of three short bursts through the sounding device provided to signal the first aid provider/safety boat.

Before the start of each practice session, all paddlers are required to pair up with the paddler beside them, in case of emergencies (buddy system). The first pair is also responsible for the drummer and the last pair for the steersperson.

Steersperson must be able to use, and crew must be able to correctly respond to, common dragon boat racing commands.

Emergency Procedures

All coaches must be knowledgeable of the established safety and emergency procedures. Coaches must outline these procedures to paddlers, steerperson and other coaches. If standards vary between the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines and an activity provider, implement the higher standards.

In the event that a boat is swamped, the following procedures must be followed:

  • steersperson must be aware of any special conditions that may apply to an individual paddler
  • steersperson must take charge of the crew until the motorized safety boat arrives
  • the crew must hold on to the boat (team members must be instructed not to swim to shore)
  • each team member must determine that his/her partner is in view (buddy system)
  • each team member must inform the steersperson if partner is missing (buddy system)
  • the approach of the safety boat must not endanger (e.g., trap) any participants in the water
  • each team member must follow steersperson’s instructions
  • if boat has sufficient flotation, crew must get into boat and paddle to shore. If not, hang onto boat and follow instructions of steersperson.

In case of an emergency, a pre-determined return route must be established.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Before involving athletes in outdoor activity, coaches must take into consideration:

  • water conditions (e.g. temperature, currents, tides and wave conditions).
  • visibility of 500 m (1640’) is required

Dragon boating practices and competitions must be cancelled in adverse weather conditions.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Coaching/Steersperson Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one dragon boat coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • Dragon Boat Canada’s Coaching Community Dragon Boat - Level 1 with a Pleasure Craft Operators license
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in dragon boat racing, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

The dragon boat steersperson must possess one of the following qualifications:

  • Dragon Boat Canada’s Steering Accreditation Course
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a steersperson in dragon boat racing, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test for Watercraft

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Lifeguard Qualifications

An individual over the age of 18 (e.g. teacher, instructor, trip guide, volunteer) must have a current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) lifeguard certificate issued by one of the following organizations:

  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard – Pool;
  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard;
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Supervision Ratios for the Swim Test for Watercraft

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

Supervision Ratios for Instructional Time

For initial on-the-water instruction ratio, 1 coach/instructor to 10 athletes.

After initial instruction, 2 supervisors per dragon boat.

One coach/supervisor must be on the dragon boat. The other could be on land, in a motorized safety boat, or in the dragon boat.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition and must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR level B or level C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • be knowledgeable of school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Safety Craft

If instruction is taking place in a pool, no safety craft is required.

A safety craft is a designated craft that is rescue-capable, taking into consideration necessary factors (e.g., distance from shore, weather, water and wind conditions), and contains at least one instructor, trip guide or individual who meets the first aid certification.

A motorized safety craft must be in the water and accessible while students are dragon boating. The operator of the motorized safety craft must have a Pleasure Craft Operator Card and must have experience in navigating the craft. The motorized safety craft must not pose a risk to the safety of the dragon boasts (e.g. create a wake).

Safety boats are optional when in a controlled area (e.g. a confined location, such as a pool, shallow waters, lakefront, or slow moving river). Other procedures for rescuing in a controlled area must be developed and in place with appropriate rescue individuals prior to dragon boating. Safety boats are required at all other times.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Fencing

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Equipment must be checked regularly for defects by students and staff, and repaired or replaced as required.

Mask, vest, gloves, foil with rubber tips.

Consult Appendix A - Sample Interschool Athletics Package for Parents/Guardians and Students of the Age of Majority regarding bringing equipment for use in class.

All equipment from home must be transported safely in a case.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Participants must wear long-sleeved shirt or sweatshirt and long pants.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Activity surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

All equipment must be worn before fencing an opponent.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision for instruction.

Constant visual supervision when fencing an opponent.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one fencing coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Instruction Coach – Aide-Moniteur Course
  • Completion of fencing NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Fencing Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in fencing, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Field Hockey

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

All rules related to stick infractions must be implemented. Consult the Ontario Field Hockey Association Rulebook.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be available for all activities/locations.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

A regulation field hockey ball must be used.

Goalkeepers or designated kicking back must wear gloves, a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet and face mask, a chest protector, a lower abdominal protector, goalie pads, kickers and throat protector.

All players must :

  • have shin guards made available to them;
  • wear a mouth guard during games and practices;
  • use regulation field hockey sticks; and
  • regularly check their sticks for cracks.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Molded cleats or turf shoes may be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles and must provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Portable Goal Posts

A portable goal is described as a freestanding structure consisting of at least two upright posts, a cross bar and support bars. It is designed to be used as a goal and can be moved to different locations.

A portable goal must be located on a level surface and securely anchored in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. When there are no instructions:

  • attach the goals securely to the ground, if the goal is located outdoors; or
  • attach the goals securely to the floor or the wall, securing them with weights, if the goal is inside.

The netting on goal posts must conform to Soccer Ontario or the local athletic association regulations.

Portable goals must be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

Prior to use goals must be checked to determine that they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students must be instructed to not climb, hang, or swing on the goals.

The Moving of Portable Goal Posts

The teacher must provide instructions to the students regarding the safe movement of the portable goals. Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher with moving portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required.

The teacher must designate an area a safe distance from the path of the moving of portable goals in which other students must stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way).

Portable goals that are not in use or are in storage must be secured in such a way that they do not pose a risk of tipping and do not otherwise present a hazard (e.g. taken apart, chained face to face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one field hockey coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Coach Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Coach Course
  • Completion of field hockey NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Field Hockey Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in field hockey, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Floorball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

The stick must be approved by the International Floorball Federation (IFF) and marked accordingly with the IFF sticker.

Stick length must be appropriate to the height of the athlete.

The blade must not have sharp edges and its hook must not exceed 30 mm.

The ball must be approved by the IFF:

  • 72mm diameter
  • weight 23g
  • hard plastic
  • 26 evenly distributed holes (e.g. similar to a whiffle ball)

Goalkeepers must not use a stick.

Goalkeeper’s net measures 160cm high and 115 cm wide.

Goalkeeper must wear:

  • properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn IFF approved/marked face mask
  • jersey (protective)
  • long trousers

Optional goalkeeper equipment:

  • any kind of protective equipment, but this must not include parts intended to cover the goal
  • knee pads under the pants
  • padded pants
  • helmet and thin gloves

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and area must be free of all obstacles (e.g. tables, chairs, pianos) and provide safe footing and traction.

Floor plugs must be in place.

Mark the goalkeeper area where no other player may play.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

The following rules must be in place and enforced by penalties:

  • no body contact
  • no blocking/screening of opposite player
  • no stick on body contact or stick on stick contact
  • stick must remain below waist at all times (including back swing and follow through)
  • ball to be played bellow knee level at all times

Implement a crease for protection of goalie. No other player’s stick is allowed in the crease.

All other International Floorball Federation Rules of the game must be followed.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Football - Flag/Touch

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Use footballs appropriate to the size and ability of group (e.g., smaller football or foam ball).

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8m (6’) high.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No metal cleats permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing area must be inspected regularly, free from debris and obstructions, well removed from traffic areas and provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Any exposed orthopaedic apparatus (e.g., knee brace) that presents a safety concern to other players must be soft or padded. Such devices must be approved by the official prior to the commencement of the game.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Body contact (blocking, picking and screening) is not permitted.

Flags must not be tucked or tied to the belt and must release easily when pulled.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Football - Tackle

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Parents must be informed about the importance of an annual equipment inspection by an accredited equipment reconditioner.

A member of the coaching staff must supervise the issuing and proper fitting of equipment including equipment supplied by the athlete.

The coaching staff must approve any exchange of equipment among players.

The minimum protective equipment that must be worn for all contact situations includes:

  • a full fit interior mouth guard
  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn helmet
  • shoulder pads
  • hip-tailbone pads
  • thigh pads
  • knee protection

Student athletes must receive instruction on how to adjust and maintain the equipment properly prior to wearing football gear.

The helmets must bear a clearly legible and legal NOCSAE warning sticker, in order to prove that the helmet meets the NOCSAE safety standard.

Football helmets must be inspected annually (e.g., equipment manager, trained coach, reconditioning company). Where helmet shows visible defects (e.g., cracks) or has reached manufacturers years of use (i.e., 10 years) it must be removed from service. Football helmets must be reconditioned as determined by an accredited equipment re-conditioner. Football helmets must be re-certified by an accredited equipment re-conditioner as per the manufacturer's requirements.

Shoulder pads must be inspected annually (e.g. equipment manager, trained coach, reconditioning company). Where shoulder pad shows loss of protective integrity or is cracked it must be removed from service.

Bladder inflation devices must be accessible on-site for helmets that have air.

Football helmets must be replaced after 10 years from date of manufacture.

For students who request to supply their own football helmet, the coach must ensure that the helmet meets the following NOCSAE reconditioning and recertification standards:

  • A recertification statement and label must be on the inside of the helmet with the:
    • name of the recertifying company
    • date of recertification – as per the manufacturer's requirements
  • The helmet is less than 10 years from date of manufacture.

All shields (visors) must be clear. Coloured or tinted visors must not be worn unless medical certification by an ophthalmologist is presented.

Down-box and yardage sticks personnel must be trained in safe use of equipment.

Blocking sleds must be checked regularly to make sure they are safe for use.

Practice equipment, such as blocking sleds and bags, must be kept at a safe distance from practising players when not in use.

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play. Padding must be 1.8m (6’) high.

Use footballs appropriate to the size and ability of group (e.g., smaller football or foam ball).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn. Clothing in practices and games must be suitable for weather conditions. Suitable footwear that satisfies football regulations and that is properly maintained must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing area must be inspected regularly, free from debris and obstructions allow for safe footing and traction and be well removed from traffic areas.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Boundary lines must be clearly visible. Lime must not be used to line the field.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Spectator stands and player benches must be well removed from playing field.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Any player with a playing cast must provide a doctor’s note or parent’s signed permission, indicating it is safe for him/her to play.

Any knee braces or casts must be approved by the official prior to the commencement of the game.

Any exposed orthopaedic apparatus must be soft or padded.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Training must include flexibility, strength and cardiovascular enhancing activities.

There must be a minimum of 4 full days in between each team’s regular scheduled games. However, in the event of unforeseen circumstances (e.g, weather), make-up or rescheduled games must be scheduled with a minimum of two full days in between (e.g., if a team has a regular scheduled game on Monday and that game must be rescheduled, it could be played the same week on the Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday, while still having 2 days between the rescheduled Friday game and the next regular scheduled game the following Monday).

Each athlete must have actively participated in at least eight days of practices that include safe tackling, blocking, and running in each practice before playing in their first game.

Safe blocking and tackling techniques (e.g., head-up tackling) must be taught and reinforced throughout the season. No head blocking or spear tackling techniques must be taught.

Coaches need to assess heat, humidity and physical condition of athletes when planning practices.

Players must not compete in two tackle football leagues at the same time. Coaches must inform parents/guardians and players that they cannot compete in two tackle football leagues at the same time (e.g., high school football and rep football).

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial practice of contact skills.

Subsequently, on-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

One member of the coaching staff must be knowledgeable of the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines concussion protocol or school board concussion protocol.

At least one member of the coaching staff must be trained in the NCCP Safe Contact module every five (5) years. This coach must be present to supervise all contact drills and all competitions.

Each member of the coaching staff must have qualifications which are derived from at least one of the following:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Novice Coach Course
  • Trained in any of the NCCP Football Courses - Positional Coach, Coordinator, Head Coach
  • Coaches that have in the past completed a level 1, 2, 3 or 4 certification (Football Canada will have transferred these designations into the current NCCP designations).
  • Attendance at a tackle football clinic or workshop, provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity and where safety is addressed, within the last five years) that is recognized as NCCP Professional Development.
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Learning Facilitator for Football
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in tackle football, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

NCCP Designation chart:

  • In-Training = I am taking a course
  • Trained = I have completed the course but not been evaluated
  • Certified = I have completed the course, completed any workbooks and that I have been successfully evaluated.

As of September 1, 2020 any individual providing instruction must be Safe Contact trained.

As of September 1, 2020, a coach new to tackle football must become Safe Contact trained within one year of their first date of coaching and must have coaching qualifications derived from at least one of the qualifications listed.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Golf

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., grips must be regularly checked and repaired as needed).Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Regulation golf balls must not be used on school property except for putting, chipping and with the use of driving cages.

Golf cages must be in good repair and be securely attached to surface.

Fully equipped golf bags must be appropriate in size and weight for athletes.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Adequate space must be provided for full backswing and follow through.

Gym (putting only).

School property.

Golf domes.

Putting course.

Driving range.

Golf Course.

Regardless of facility, the hitting area must be well marked and controlled.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Establish a safe routine for hitting and retrieving golf balls, and a designated safe area for use of regulation balls while chipping.

During instruction, or while waiting to practice hitting or swinging, non-active players’ clubs must remain on the ground or in their bag.

Athletes must have an opportunity to develop skills before playing on golf course.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision for instruction, when chipping with regulation golf balls and practicing at a range facility.

In-the-area supervision is required on a golf course.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Gymnastics

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Parallel Bars/High Bar/Still Rings/Pommel Horse Balance Beam/Uneven Parallel Bars/Floor/Table or Flatback Vaulting
Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Equipment must be inspected on a regular basis and repaired as necessary.

Vaulting boards that are higher than 20cm at the take-off end are not allowed. Only vaulting boards to be used for take-offs. Vaulting boards used to mount the apparatus must be removed immediately after use.

Box horses must not be used for vaulting.

Coach must do a safety check for proper set-up prior to student use. Determine all locking mechanisms are checked prior to use.

Balance beams for competition must be padded and stable.

General utility mats to be used:

  • cross-link foam 5cm (2’’)
  • open-cell foam 5cm (2”)
  • polyurethane 5cm (2”)
  • dual-density 5cm (2”)
  • mats of equivalent compaction rating as determined by manufacturer

Hardside softside landing mats (minimum of 12cm [4.5”] for each apparatus) must be in place when the student is in an elevated inverted body position, and for landings on the feet from a height.

Mats joined together side-by-side must be of uniform thickness and composition (e.g., all carpet or all vinyl).

For handspring flatback vaulting on stacked mats and on vaulting table, the mats must be roped together to a minimum height of 105cm (42”) and a maximum of 125cm (50”), using 5cm (2”) increments. The top of the mat must be hard-side up.

For skill acquisition, equipment must be adapted to the size and ability of the athlete.

Equipment must be stored in a safe and secure manner.

Proper hand grips and chalk must be available.

30-60cm (12”-24”) thick mats must not be used as a landing surface for landing on feet off any piece of equipment.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., bare feet, running shoes or gymnastic slippers). No sock feet permitted.

Secure or remove eyeglasses.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

Tie back long hair and remove hair clips.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Activity surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Mats must be situated around/under apparatus as a landing area.

Precautions must be taken to minimize the movement of mats on impact.

Velcro® mats must be attached.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Minimum distance between equipment must be 1.5m (5’) beyond mats.

Minimum distance from wall must be 1.5m (5’) if padded with vaulting.

Additional matting must be placed beyond the corners of the competitive floor area, extending out 60cm (2’) around the corner of either side.

When a spring floor is not available for competition and/or when there is insufficient space around the floor area, consideration must be given to modifying the composition of the routine.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Coach must be aware of the physical limitations of the athletes.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Utilize a safe and sequential skill development program that includes a conditioning component for flexibility and strength.

Athletes must not be encouraged to perform skills beyond their physical and psychological capabilities.

Athletes must be instructed on safety related to gymnastics and all associated apparatus, including adjusting equipment, prior to using any equipment.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Constant visual supervision is required for the initial learning stages of difficult moves.

Athletes must be trained to spot each other appropriately.

Only coaches shall spot inverted vault and aerial moves.

Coach must supervise the set-up and take-down of equipment.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills, strategies and any restricted moves to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one gymnastic coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport coach – Gymnastics Foundations Course
  • Completion of gymnastic NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Gymnastics Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in gymnastics, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Handball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Wall

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

When playing on an enclosed, regulation court, protective eyewear must be worn.

Students wearing eyeglasses are to wear appropriate eye protection (e.g., shatter proof lenses).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

In side-by-side court situations, a safety procedure must be established.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

When teaching skills and playing, there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Hockey

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Ice hockey games
Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Goalies must wear:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly-worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full face mask;
  • a throat protector;
  • a catcher, blocker, leg pads;
  • a chest and arm protector; and
  • a cup or pelvic protector.

Players must wear:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly-worn CSA-approved hockey helmet with full face mask;
  • a throat protector;
  • shin pads (cracked shin pads must be replaced immediately);
  • pants;
  • shoulder and elbow pads;
  • hockey gloves; and
  • a cup or pelvic protector.

Sticks:

  • Regulation hockey sticks must be used.
  • Butt end must be covered with tape or a commercially made butt end.
  • Cracked or splintered sticks must not be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Properly fitting ice hockey skates must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

The ice surface must be free from debris and deep ruts.

Break away net mandatory.

For outside facilities (e.g., ponds, lakes), prior to activity, check with local authorities to determine whether ice is safe for skating and that there are no hazards.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Natural Ice Locations (Lakes, Ponds, Rivers)

Only Board/school approved natural ice locations must be used.

An approved natural ice location is one that is monitored and tested by a recognized organization (e.g., local municipality, police, and snowmobile clubs) and/or a recognized knowledgeable individual (e.g., winter camp supervisor) that measures ice thickness for activity safety.

Prior to an activity on natural ice surface the teacher/supervisor must contact local authorities to determine with absolute certainty that the ice surface is thick enough to be safe. The ice thickness must be a minimum of 15cm (6") and must be measured in several places.

The use of natural ice involves some risk. Here are safety criteria minimize the risks:

  • Stay off the ice of any natural ice surface where conditions cannot be measured.
  • Stay away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, avoid traveling on ice at night unless necessary
  • Obey all ice warning signs.
  • The teacher/supervisor must be in close proximity to students on the ice surface.
  • The teachers/supervisors must be knowledgeable of the procedures to follow for rescuing an individual who has fallen through the ice.
  • Students must be informed on ice safety and ice rescue procedures prior to the activity (e.g., not to go on the ice surface alone).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No more than three games can be played in one day, as per Ontario Hockey Federation (OHF) rules.

The number of games and skill competitions (e.g., agility, racing) in any one day must not present a safety concern.

Prior to the first game, multiple practices on ice must have occurred.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • snow conditions (e.g. snow/ice storms) and visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. frostbite, hypothermia).

The school board’s weather procedures are the minimum standards at all times. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial practice of contact skills.

On-site supervision thereafter.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one hockey coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Coach Stream Course
  • Completion of hockey NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Hockey Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in hockey, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Lacrosse - Box/Field

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Sticks and balls for box and field lacrosse:

Check wooden sticks for cracks and splinters.

Box Lacrosse: full equipment to be worn.

Men’s Field Lacrosse: full equipment to be worn.

Women’s Field Lacrosse: no aggressive checking with either the stick or the body is allowed.

Player equipment (Box and Men’s Field Lacrosse):

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full cage or a lacrosse helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association
  • shoulder pads with arm guards
  • elbow pads
  • gloves
  • kidney pads
  • athletic cup or jill strap

Please consult Ontario Women's Field Lacrosse for direction regarding eye wear and helmets.

Goalie equipment (Box and Men’s/Women’s Field Lacrosse):

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer’s guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full cage or a lacrosse helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association
  • throat protector
  • goalie gloves
  • goalie pants
  • athletic cup or jill strap
  • leg pants

Mouth guards - check league ruling regarding mandatory use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. (e.g., basketball or court shoes). No metal cleats permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing area must be free of debris and obstacles, and provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Perimeter of the field must be marked.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Portable Goal Posts

A portable goal is described as a freestanding structure consisting of at least two upright posts, a cross bar and support bars. It is designed to be used as a goal and can be moved to different locations.

A portable goal must be located on a level surface and securely anchored in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. When there are no instructions:

  • attach the goals securely to the ground, if the goal is located outdoors; or
  • attach the goals securely to the floor or the wall, securing them with weights, if the goal is inside.

The netting on goal posts must conform to Soccer Ontario or the local athletic association regulations.

Portable goals must be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

Prior to use goals must be checked to determine that they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students must be instructed to not climb, hang, or swing on the goals.

The Moving of Portable Goal Posts

The teacher must provide instructions to the students regarding the safe movement of the portable goals. Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher with moving portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required.

The teacher must designate an area a safe distance from the path of the moving of portable goals in which other students must stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way).

Portable goals that are not in use or are in storage must be secured in such a way that they do not pose a risk of tipping and do not otherwise present a hazard (e.g. taken apart, chained face to face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

When teaching skills of throwing and catching, adequate spacing must be allowed for:

  • athletes to make an uninterrupted swing
  • pairs/groups not to interfere with one another

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial practice of contact skills.

On-site supervision thereafter.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one lacrosse coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Coach Initiation Course
  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Coach Development Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Introduction Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Lacrosse Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of lacrosse NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in lacrosse, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Mountain Biking

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Athletes must do a safety inspection of bicycle before each use.

A properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn bicycle helmet that is certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. CSA, CSPC, ASTM, Snell, BSI, AS) must be worn.

One rider to carry a bicycle tool kit and pump during practice.

Coach to carry a first aid kit and signaling device (e.g., whistle).

Protective eyewear (e.g., sunglasses must be worn).

When downhill mountain biking, appropriate safety gear for the facility must be worn.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No open toed shoes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Choose routes carefully in terms of the length, road surface, frequency of traffic, complexity of intersections and railway crossings.

Prior to initial use of route, coach/convenor must do a safety ride through to verify safety and suitability.

Provide athletes with map and/or clear directions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Athletes must be made aware of emergency procedures.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

The rules of the Highway Traffic Act and local bylaws must be reviewed and followed.

An initial riding pre-test (safety emphasized) must be passed before leaving school property (e.g., competency in stopping, changing gears, turning and passing).

Instruct participants to keep a safe distance from each other (e.g., 2-3m) to prevent interference/tripping one another.

Instruction must be given on the proper position of the bicycle helmet.

A record of athletes, and the route taken, must be left in the school with an appropriate person.

Use the buddy system during practice.

Excursions/competitions must take place in daylight hours.

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players) must be used.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one mountain biking coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Let’s Ride! Community Cycling Initiation Course
  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Let’s Ride! Basic Cycling Skills
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Ready to Race! Training Basics Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Ready to Race! Skills and Tactics Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Ready to Race! Training to Race Course
  • Completion of cycling NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Cycling Learning Facilitator
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in mountain biking, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Ringette

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Ice
Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Use a regulation rubber quoit.

Players must wear:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with face guard consisting of either full metal cage with triangular holes or half plastic visor/half metal cage with triangular holes
  • hockey gloves
  • elbow pads, shin guards
  • shoulder pads
  • cup or pelvic protector

Goalie must wear:

  • a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet and protective mask with full metal cage with triangular holes
  • catcher/blocker
  • elbow pads
  • chest and arm protector
  • leg pads
  • cup or pelvic protector

Sticks:

  • use only regulation ringette sticks
  • check regularly for cracks
  • excel stick is NOT to be used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Properly fitting ice hockey skates must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Ice surfaces must be free from debris and deep ruts.

Before ringette on an outdoor ice surface (e.g., lake, pond), contact local authorities for information to determine with absolute certainty that the ice is thick enough to be safe for activity.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Natural Ice Locations (Lakes, Ponds, Rivers)

Only Board/school approved natural ice locations must be used.

An approved natural ice location is one that is monitored and tested by a recognized organization (e.g., local municipality, police, and snowmobile clubs) and/or a recognized knowledgeable individual (e.g., winter camp supervisor) that measures ice thickness for activity safety.

Prior to an activity on natural ice surface the teacher/supervisor must contact local authorities to determine with absolute certainty that the ice surface is thick enough to be safe. The ice thickness must be a minimum of 15cm (6") and must be measured in several places.

The use of natural ice involves some risk. Here are safety criteria minimize the risks:

  • Stay off the ice of any natural ice surface where conditions cannot be measured.
  • Stay away from unfamiliar paths or unknown ice, avoid traveling on ice at night unless necessary
  • Obey all ice warning signs.
  • The teacher/supervisor must be in close proximity to students on the ice surface.
  • The teachers/supervisors must be knowledgeable of the procedures to follow for rescuing an individual who has fallen through the ice.
  • Students must be informed on ice safety and ice rescue procedures prior to the activity (e.g., not to go on the ice surface alone).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • snow conditions (e.g. snow/ice storms) and visibility.

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. frostbite, hypothermia).

The school board’s weather procedures are the minimum standards at all times. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one ringette coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Sport – Initiation Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition – Introduction (Cl-1)
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Ringette Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of ringette NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in ringette, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Roller (Inline) Hockey

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g. cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Inline pucks or balls.

Sticks:

  • regulation hockey sticks
  • butt end must be covered with tape or a commercially made butt end
  • checked for cracks and splinters

Goalies must wear:

  • properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full mask
  • throat protector
  • catcher, blocker, leg pads
  • chest and arm protectors
  • cup or pelvic protector

Players must wear:

  • properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn CSA approved hockey helmet with full face mask
  • throat protector
  • shin pads (cracked shin pads must be replaced immediately)
  • wrist guards
  • inline hockey pants
  • shoulder and elbow pads
  • hockey gloves
  • cup or pelvic protector

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn.

Properly fitting inline hockey skates must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Surface must be free from debris and deep ruts.

Floor plugs must be in place.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No body checking permitted.

No more than three games can be played in one day.

The number of games and skill competitions (e.g. agility, racing) in any one day must not present a safety concern.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one roller hockey coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Coach Stream Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Hockey Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of hockey NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in roller (inline) hockey, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Rowing

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D – Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Shell inspected before each outing (e.g., check for holes, cracks, loose hardware).

Shell must have bow-ball in good repair.

Bow and stern buoyancy compartments must be securely closed with water-tight hatches.

In practice sessions, each shell must be equipped with a signalling device and a watertight flashlight.

Heel restraints on shoes must be in place and adjusted properly to permit effective extraction of feet during emergencies.

Must have bow and stern lights attached during poor visibility (e.g., bike lights, flashlights).

Oars must be checked for splinters and cracks.

Riggers and oar-locks must be secure and operate freely.

Steering lines must be secure and operating correctly.

Regattas require dedicated safety boats with communication (e.g., two-way radios between boat and shore).

Boat engine must be running before crew leaves dock.

Boat must be equipped with a 60cm life ring with 9m floating lines attached in addition to the 15m heaving line.

One supervisor/instructor boat must be motorized and equipped as per Transport Canada's Safe Boating Guide requirements. Examples:

  • One CSA approved lifejacket/PFD of appropriate size for each member of the coach boat plus one for each member of the largest vessel
  • paddles
  • bailer
  • watertight flashlight
  • signaling device
  • motor in good repair, with sufficient gas for entire session
  • 23m (75’) floating rope

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

A dry change of clothes must be available on shore.

Coach boat occupants are required to wear PFDs at all times.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

Long hair must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

When using an indoor rowing facility, the rules and regulations of that facility must be followed.

Dockside/Boathouse

Must have posted walking traffic pattern with hazards identified (e.g., keep to right, dock slippery when wet).

Must have phone with posted emergency numbers (e.g., 911).

Keep spectators out of boat launch area and high boat-traffic areas.

On the Water

Course must be inspected before each use.

Be aware of debris on course, especially after heavy rain.

Coach/Instructor must inform athletes of debris.

Be aware of water currents, especially those created by rapids and waterfalls.

All practice and competition sites must not include rapids and waterfalls.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Swim Test for Watercraft

Prior to rowing, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke
  • demonstrate the ability to put on a PFD while in the water

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a certified aquatic instructor (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Results of the swim test must be documented and communicated as per school board policy (e.g., to the student, teacher, principal, parents/guardians, trip guide(s), lifeguards, aquatic instructor, and outside provider [if applicable]).

Students who do not pass the swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not row.

Emergency Procedures

Site specific rescue plan must be devised and shared with all supervisors and participants.

Athletes must receive instruction on safety procedures, use of equipment and rowing techniques prior to initial practice.

Athletes must be instructed to remain with rowing shell and oars for flotation and visibility purposes if an accident occurs.

All instructors must be knowledgeable of the established safety and capsize procedures. Instructors must outline these procedures to rowers and coxswains.

Should a shell swamp (take on water), rowers are not to attempt to swim to shore but stay with the boat using it as a flotation device and follow these steps:

  • Crew numbers off and removes feet from shoes. Remain in place if possible.
  • Make distress signal.
  • If necessary, crew enters water in pairs from middle of boat, buddy up across boat.
  • Coxswain buddies with stern pair.
  • Swing oars parallel to shell to increase flotation.
  • Unless rescue is imminent, move crew to bow and stern and roll shell over (fin up) with the wind. Crew should lie across hull, as far out of the water as possible, in pairs, holding on to the other person.
  • Coach boat distributes PFDs on arrival and conducts headcount.
  • Coach boat shuttles rowers to nearest shore. DO NOT overload coach boat.
  • Conduct headcount on returning.
  • Recover shell.

In case of an emergency, a pre-determined return route must be established.

A log book must be provided on-shore with all students and coaches required to sign out before launching and in upon returning.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Before involving athletes in outdoor activity, coaches must take into consideration:

  • water conditions (e.g. temperature, currents, tides and wave conditions).
  • visibility of 500m (1640’) is required

Follow cold water rules specific to the rowing facility.

Coaches/supervisors must be aware of weather forecasts, especially wind conditions, temperature of the day, potential for thunder/lightning and fog conditions.

Rowing must be cancelled in adverse conditions (e.g., first sign of white caps).

If stormy weather approaches suddenly, seek appropriate shelter immediately.

Daylight rowing only.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Operator of boat must have Pleasure Craft Operator Card.

Coach in motorized boat within 500m of crew during all on-water practice sessions.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must meet with the head coach of the rowing club (if applicable) prior to the start of the season and be in communication throughout the season.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one rowing coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – RCA Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Rowing Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of rowing NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in rowing, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test for Watercraft

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Lifeguard Qualifications

An individual over the age of 18 (e.g. teacher, instructor, trip guide, volunteer) must have a current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) lifeguard certificate issued by one of the following organizations:

  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard – Pool;
  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard;
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Supervision Ratios for the Swim Test for Watercraft

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

Supervision Ratios for Instructional Time

Beginner rowers: 1 coach per 9 athletes

Experienced rowers: 1 coach per 18 athletes

In addition, there must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition and must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Rugby - Tackle

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

All equipment must comply with World Rugby Regulation 12.

Regulation rugby balls must be used.

A full fit interior mouth guard is required.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing (e.g., snug-fitting, collarless jersey) and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

No eye or sport glasses are permitted.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Studs/cleats

Studs/cleats must be worn.

Studs/cleats must be consistent with World Rugby Regulation 12:

  • Stud/cleat length must be no longer than 21mm.
  • Studs/cleats must not be nylon.
  • Moulded rubber multi-studded soles are acceptable provided they have no sharp edges or ridges.
  • Replaceable studs must be capable of repeated fixing and removal without creating a hazard.

Soccer cleats or rubber/plastic rugby cleats are permissible.

Football and baseball cleats are not appropriate.

Metal cleats are not appropriate on artificial turf surfaces and are only recommended for natural grass in wet conditions.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

The playing area must be inspected regularly, be free from debris and obstructions, allow for safe footing and traction, and be well removed from traffic areas.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Use collapsible flags or soft pylons to mark corners, mid-line and 22m (66’) line, or flags off the sidelines.

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Any exposed orthopaedic apparatus (e.g., knee brace) that presents a safety concern to other players must be soft or padded. Such devices must be approved by the official prior to the commencement of the game.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Prior to the first league game, 8 days of practices that contain contact (e.g. scrums, rucks, mauls, line-outs, and tackling) must have occurred.

Athletes must be taught that head hits and high tackles are not permitted.

Tackling, scrum, maul, ruck and line-out skill progressions must be taught and practiced prior to competition.

Training must include flexibility, strength and cardiovascular-enhancing activities.

Players must be physically prepared for contact.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial instruction and practice of contact skills.

Subsequently, on-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one rugby coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Initiation/World Rugby Level 1 Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Introduction/World Rugby Level 2 Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Rugby Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of rugby NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in rugby, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

As of September 1, 2019, one coach must have a minimum certification of NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Initiation/World Rugby Level 1. This coach must supervise all the contact drills and all the competitions.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Soccer

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Indoor/Outdoor

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Shin pads must be worn.

Size and weight of soccer ball must be appropriate to the age and skill level of participants.

Outdoor soccer balls must not be used indoors in gymnasium settings for games or shooting on goalie, but may be used for indoor drills.

Sponge, futsal or indoor soccer balls are to be used for indoor (gymnasium) school soccer games.

Outdoor soccer balls can be used in covered/domed complexes.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Molded cleats only. No metal or compound cleats permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Indoor playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Outdoor playing area must be free from debris and obstructions and be well-removed from traffic areas.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Permanent Goal Posts

Permanent goal posts must be checked that they are in safe condition and that the concrete footing at the base of the posts are covered and do not pose a hazard.

Netting on goal posts must conform to Ontario Soccer or the local athletic association regulations.

Portable Goal Posts

A portable goal is described as a freestanding structure consisting of at least two upright posts, a cross bar and support bars. It is designed to be used as a goal and can be moved to different locations.

A portable goal must be located on a level surface and securely anchored in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. When there are no instructions:

  • attach the goals securely to the ground, if the goal is located outdoors; or
  • attach the goals securely to the floor or the wall, securing them with weights, if the goal is inside.

The netting on goal posts must conform to Ontario Soccer or the local athletic association regulations.

Portable goals must be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

Prior to use goals must be checked to determine that they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students must be instructed to not climb, hang, or swing on the goals.

The Moving of Portable Goal Posts

The coach must provide instructions to the students regarding the safe movement of the portable goals. Only students who have been properly trained can assist the coach with moving portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required.

The coach must designate an area a safe distance from the path of the moving of portable goals in which other students must stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way).

Portable goals that are not in use or are in storage must be secured in such a way that they do not pose a risk of tipping and do not otherwise present a hazard (e.g. taken apart, chained face to face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

An exposed orthopaedic apparatus that represents a safety concern to other players must be soft or padded. Such devices must be approved by the referee prior to the commencement of the game.

Any player with a playing cast must provide a doctor’s note or parent/guardian signed permission indicating it is safe for him/her to play.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Limit time spent on heading drills.

No tackling from behind.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Constant visual supervision is required while moving portable goals.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must be knowledgeable of the school board’s concussion protocol and must follow the school’s first aid emergency action plan, including accessibility to a vehicle for transportation of a student to hospital (consult Appendix E - Emergency Action Plan) and be present during the entire practice/competition.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Softball - Fast Pitch

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

The wooden bats must not be cracked. All of the bats must have a proper grip.

The bats and gloves must comply with the current Softball Canada rules (e.g., Amateur Softball Association bat policy (ASA2004)).

The batter, on-deck batter, bat boy/bat girl, base runners and base coaches (located behind first and third base) must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn batting helmet with flaps, covering both ears and certified by a recognized safety standards association.

Helmet chinstraps are mandatory and must be worn as designed by the manufacturer.

The catchers (including the warm-up catchers) must wear all of the equipment specified under Baseball Ontario rules (i.e., all catchers are required to wear a mask with a throat protector, a helmet, a chest protector, shin guards, a cup and a cup-type supporter).

Protection suitable for the pelvic area must be worn by all of the players.

Student umpires must wear a mask and chest pad when they are positioned behind home plate.

Pitching machines must be inspected prior to use and be under the direct supervision of a teacher/coach.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Only molded cleats are permitted. No metal or compound cleats permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

For indoor practices, playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Diamond must be level and groomed.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Practice fields must be level and away from traffic and other activities.

Backstops must be checked for broken wire prior to use.

Entrance gates to the playing field must be closed at all times.

Dugouts and/or players benches must be screened to protect players.

If in the opinion of the umpire, after consultation with both coaches, the field is deemed to be unsafe for play, the game must be rescheduled.

There must be sufficient turf for safe footing and traction.

Prior to using back-stops, fences and fields must be checked for hazards. Any hazards found must be reported to athletes and appropriate officials.

Modify the activity to avoid hazards (e.g., mark hazards with cones, cover hole in fence with mat).

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Any exposed orthopaedic apparatus (e.g., knee brace, cast) which presents a safety concern to other players, must be soft or padded. Such devices must be approved by the official prior to the commencement of the game.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Training must include flexibility, strength and cardiovascular enhancing activities.

The players must be informed about the importance of keeping their eyes on the flight of the ball when playing offense (e.g., running bases) and when playing defense (e.g., pitcher, infielders and outfielders).

Appropriate sliding techniques must be taught to minimize the risk of injury before sliding is permitted.

Warm-ups and drills (e.g., hitting, throwing, stretching) must each be in a designated area so that one activity does not present a hazard to another.

Players must be taught to drop or lay the bat down after hitting, not release it during the follow through of the swing.

Pitchers are limited to the Softball Canada Association limits.

Players not involved in the game must be in dugouts or players’ benches.

The location of spectators must not present a safety concern.

When practicing indoors with a regulation bat:

  • use a batting cage;
  • use a pitching machine in a confined area free from student traffic or use a pitcher behind a protective cage or batters hit off a tee (in each case batters hit into a cage); and
  • all non active players must be behind cage, no fielders allowed.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Softball - Lob Ball/Slo Pitch/Three Pitch

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Wooden bats must not be cracked. All bats must have proper grip.

The bats must comply with the current Slo-Pitch Ontario Association (SPO) rules (e.g., Amateur Softball Association bat policy [ASA2004]).

The batter, on-deck batter, bat person, base runners and base coaches (located behind first and third base) must wear a properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn batting helmet with flaps, covering both ears certified by a recognized safety standards association.

Helmets equipped with chin straps must be done up; otherwise, the helmet must fit such that it will stay on the head.

All of the defensive players must wear baseball gloves.

Student umpires must wear a mask and a chest pad when positioned behind home plate.

The catchers must wear shin protectors, a chest protector and a mask with a throat protector.

The catcher must wear suitable protection for the pelvic area.

Use softballs appropriate to the skill level of the athletes.

The bases must be properly secured.

A safety bag must be used at first base.

Keep all of the equipment not being used out of the practice/playing area.

Where pitching machines are being used they must be inspected prior to use and be under the direct supervision of a teacher/coach.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Molded baseball cleats or running shoes must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing area must be inspected regularly, be free from debris and obstructions, and be well removed from traffic areas and provide safe footing and traction.

For indoor practices, playing surface must provide safe footing and traction and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs).

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Goalposts must be padded if in field of play.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Training must include flexibility, strength and cardiovascular-enhancing activities.

Players must be physically prepared for contact.

Non-fielding players must be on the bench or in the designated area of bench.

The players must be informed about the importance of keeping their eyes on the flight of the ball when playing offense (e.g., running bases) and when playing defense (e.g., pitcher, infielders and outfielders).

Non-fielding players must stand well back of the batter’s box, must be on the bench, or must be behind a screen or fence, with fingers kept away from the screen to avoid dangers of a slipped bat.

A commitment line on the third-base line must be used.

All plays at home plate must be force plays. Tagging at home plate is not permitted.

Players must be instructed to drop or lay the bat down after hitting, not release it during the follow through of the swing.

Appropriate sliding techniques must be taught to minimize the risk of injury before sliding is permitted.

The location of spectators must not present a safety concern.

When practicing indoors with a regulation bat:

  • use a batting cage;
  • use a pitcher behind a protective cage or batters hit off a tee (in each case batters hit into a cage); and
  • all non active players must be behind cage, no fielders allowed.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Squash

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for damage and to determine proper grip.

Protective eye gear must be worn.

Students wearing eyeglasses must wear appropriate eye protection (e.g., shatterproof lenses).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

When teaching skills and playing there must be adequate spacing for each player to make an uninterrupted swing.

Only singles must be played unless a proper doubles court is available.

No more than four players to a playing area.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision during instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Swimming and Synchronized Swimming

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Consult the Outdoor Education - Swimming page for swimming in lakes, ponds and rivers.

For Class A pools.

All pools are governed by the Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565. Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D – Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Must have accessibility to standard safety equipment as stated in Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565.

Electrical equipment (e.g., MP3 players) must be properly grounded.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

Long hair must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Backyard pools must not be used.

Use school or community swimming pools.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Pool deck must be kept clear of obstacles and excess water.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Inform in-charge person on deck of any student with a medical history or any medical problems that may affect the student’s safety in water (e.g., diabetes, asthma, heart condition, convulsions, epilepsy, frequent ear infections).

Students with infected cuts or sores must not be in the pool.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Emergency procedures must be outlined to students prior to entering the water.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Students must adhere to the following rules:

  • no running or pushing on deck
  • no gum chewing
  • no food in pool area
  • no diving off deck or blocks into water less than 2.75m (9’) in depth
  • no street shoes on deck

Skill instruction can be followed by skill application (for example, relay activities, tag games which incorporate skills). This is considered to be part of the instructional program – not recreational/free swim.

Instructional swim may include organized games (for example, relays) but cannot include an unorganized recreational/free swim.

Showers must be taken before entering the pool.

During recreational swim, students must not use a mask, snorkel or use scuba equipment.

Teachers acting as aquatic instructor and/or lifeguard/assistant lifeguard must be knowledgeable of school board’s procedures for emergency, accident or injury in pool. O. Reg. 565, July 1, 2018 17 (1)

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Swim Test for Shallow and Deep Water

An initial screening/testing of swimming ability must be done in shallow end.

Schools must adhere to the facility swim test standard regarding the components of the swim test for shallow and deep water. If a facility swim test standard does not exist, the Lifesaving Society Swim to Survive swim standard must be used.

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

The test must be administered by a certified aquatic instructor (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Results of the swim test must be documented and communicated as per school board policy (e.g., to the student, teacher, principal, parents/guardians, trip guide(s), lifeguards, aquatic instructor, and outside provider [if applicable]).

Students who do not pass the swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not compete.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

A coach or other school supervisor must accompany pupils to the pool, and be on deck or in the pool.

Close and frequent monitoring of change rooms must take place, but not by the lifeguard.

Athletes must notify coach/in-charge person if leaving pool area.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one swimming coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Fundamentals Coach (Swimming 101) course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Age Group Coach (Swimming 201) Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Swimming Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of swimming’s NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in swimming having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

At least one synchronized swimming coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Instruction Coach – Instructor Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Introduction Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Swimming Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of synchronized swimming’s NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach synchronized swimming having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Lifeguard Qualifications

An individual over the age of 18 (e.g. teacher, instructor, trip guide, volunteer) must have a current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) lifeguard certificate issued by one of the following organizations:

  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard – Pool;
  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard;
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Supervision Ratios for the Swim Test for Shallow and Deep Water

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 aquatic instructors per 25 students (grades 1-3), per 35 students (grades 4-8).

In situations where there are 26-50 students (grades 1-3) or 36-70 students (grades 4-8) an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

Supervision Ratios for Instructional Time

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 aquatic instructors per 25 students (grades 1-3), per 35 students (grades 4-8).

In situations where there are 26-50 students (grades 1-3) or 36-70 students (grades 4-8) an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

Supervision Ratios for Recreational Time (Free Swim – No Instruction)

According to Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565, during a recreational/free swim, a certified lifeguard is required. Aquatic instructor certification and OTAS do not meet the safety requirements of the regulation.

When certified lifeguards are on deck, the minimum ratio of lifeguards to bathers on deck and in the pool is:

  • 2 lifeguards per 1-125 bathers. If the teacher is a certified lifeguard, they may act as one of the two lifeguards, and therefore a third person is not necessary.
  • 3 lifeguards per 126-250 bathers. If the teacher is a certified lifeguard they may act as one of the three lifeguards, and therefore a fourth person is not necessary.

When certified lifeguards and assistant lifeguards are on deck the minimum ratio of lifeguards and assistant lifeguards to bathers on deck and in the pool is:

  • 2 lifeguards or 1 lifeguard and 1 assistant lifeguard per 1-100 bathers. If the teacher is a certified assistant lifeguard/lifeguard, they may act with a lifeguard, and therefore a third person is not necessary.
  • 3 lifeguards or 2 lifeguards and 1 assistant lifeguard per 101-200 bathers. If the teacher is a certified assistant lifeguard/lifeguard, they may act with two lifeguards, and therefore a fourth person is not necessary.

The number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Table Tennis

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Regulation size paddles and table tennis balls are required.

Tables and paddles must be in good condition.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Surrounding area must be free of all obstacles and must provide safe footing and traction.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

There must be room for mobility around tables.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Athletes must be instructed on safe set up and dismantling of tables.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Team Handball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Regulation team handballs are to be used in competition.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Permanent Goal Posts

Permanent goal posts must be checked that they are in safe condition and that the concrete footing at the base of the posts are covered and do not pose a hazard.

Netting on goal posts must conform to bthe local athletic association regulations.

Portable Goal Posts

A portable goal is described as a freestanding structure consisting of at least two upright posts, a cross bar and support bars. It is designed to be used as a goal and can be moved to different locations.

A portable goal must be located on a level surface and securely anchored in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. When there are no instructions:

  • attach the goals securely to the ground, if the goal is located outdoors; or
  • attach the goals securely to the floor or the wall, securing them with weights, if the goal is inside.

The netting on goal posts must conform to Soccer Ontario or the local athletic association regulations.

Portable goals must be inspected on a regular basis for anything that would hinder effective movement (e.g. defective wheels).

Prior to use goals must be checked to determine that they are secure in such a way that they will not tip over.

Students must be instructed to not climb, hang, or swing on the goals.

The Moving of Portable Goal Posts

The teacher must provide instructions to the students regarding the safe movement of the portable goals. Only students who have been properly trained can assist the teacher with moving portable goals. Constant visual supervision is required.

The teacher must designate an area a safe distance from the path of the moving of portable goals in which other students must stay. Check that the path is clear (no obstructions and/or students in the way).

Portable goals that are not in use or are in storage must be secured in such a way that they do not pose a risk of tipping and do not otherwise present a hazard (e.g. taken apart, chained face to face).

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Tennis

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Racquets must be inspected regularly for damage and to determine proper grip.

Where ball machines are being used they must be inspected prior to use and be under the direct supervision of a coach.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and provide safe footing and traction.

Court boundary lines must be clearly defined.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

A safety procedure must be established for side-by-side courts.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

When teaching skills, there must be adequate spacing for each student athlete to make a free and uninterrupted swing.

When playing with more than two players on the court, positioning and movement must be taught.

Spectators must not pose a safety concern.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision during initial instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

On-site supervision during equipment set up and take down.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Discus

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Discus size must be appropriate for the size and sex of the student.

Discus must not be cracked, chipped or otherwise damaged and must be checked regularly.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles and must provide safe footing and traction.

The throwing area must be free of obstacles and completely closed to traffic (no other activity must be located in the area where discus is taking place).

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

The landing area must be well marked and void of people during the activity.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Establish and provide safe throwing and retrieving procedures.

Instruction must be given in safety prior to practice.

In practices, where a protective screen is not in place, students and spectators must be in a designated area a minimum of 15m (49’) directly behind thrower.

During practices thrower or monitor must determine that everyone within landing distance is watching the throw.

During competitions there must be a protective screen.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for initial skill instruction.

Following initial skill instruction and after all safety concerns have been emphasized, on-site supervision is appropriate.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one track and field - discus coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Sport Coach Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Club Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Track and Field Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of athletics NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in track and field - discus, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - High Jump

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Landing Mats:

  • The landing area must be a minimum mat surface of 3m x 5m x .5m (10’X16.5’X20”) as per IAAF Standards.
  • Checks mats regularly for damage and repair or replace as necessary.
  • Jumping pits used adjacent to one another must be of the same thickness and compaction rating and be covered to prevent an athlete from slipping between pits upon landing.

Cross Bars:

  • Fibreglass crossbars must be used in competition.
  • Regularly check crossbars for cracks.
  • Weighted rope or elastic may be used for warm-up or practice.

High Jump Standards:

Check standards regularly for damage. Repair or replace as needed.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Students may wear 5mm spikes on rubberized or asphalt jumping surfaces. No track shoes with spikes removed permitted. No bare feet or socks without shoes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Activity and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs).

Approach areas must be smooth, traffic-free and provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Bar monitors must stay in front and off to the side of standards prior to and during each jump.

High-jump landing surface must not butt up against a wall and must be a minimum of 1m (3’3”) from any wall and any other permanent structures.

Determine that landing mats are firmly secured and do not slide upon impact.

When landing surfaces are set up but are not being used, deterrents for use must be in place, (e.g., mark perimeter with cones, provide supervision, put mats in storage area, place sign on mats.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for initial skill instruction.

Following initial skill instruction and after all safety concerns have been emphasized, on-site supervision is appropriate.

Use of mats requires supervision.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one track and field - high jump coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Sport Coach Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Club Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Track and Field Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of athletics NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in track and field - high jump, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Hurdles

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Check for safety of hurdles (e.g., stable, no splinters, cracks or other hazards).

Check safety of starting blocks if they are used.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Track spikes as allowed by competition facility or the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) rules. No bare feet or socks without shoes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

All tracks must be inspected annually and maintained as necessary.

Indoor surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Activity in appropriate area, which provides a clear, flat surface.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Run-out areas must be in place.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Instruct athletes how to set up hurdles properly, so that knocked hurdles will not resist hurdler’s fall.

Determine that hurdles are set at the correct height and with the correct spacing.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for initial skill instruction.

Following initial skill instruction on-site supervision is appropriate.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Javelin

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Javelin must be appropriate in size for the age, sex and strength of the athlete during practices.

For competitions, OFSAA rules are: Girls, 600g. Boys midget and junior, 600g. Boys senior, 800g.

Javelin must not be cracked, bent or otherwise damaged and must be checked regularly.

Turbo javelins/turbojavs and other equivalent commercially made equipment may be used for practice. No homemade equipment.

Ensure equipment joints and noses are tight before throwing.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

The throwing area must be free of obstacles and completely closed to traffic (no other activity can be located in the area where javelin is taking place).

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

The landing area must be well marked and void of people during the activity.

The run up area must provide safe footing and traction.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Skills and techniques associated with the javelin throw must be taught in proper progression. The importance of throwing techniques must be emphasized.

Instruction in safety must be given prior to practice.

Establish safe routines for throwing and retrieving of the javelin.

Javelins must be carried safely to and from practice/competition area (e.g., the javelin must point downwards and not be carried on or over the shoulder).

Javelin must never be thrown back to throwing area.

All participants must receive instruction on the importance of safety procedures when throwing, retrieving the javelin after a throw and return to the safety zone or area prior to anyone throwing.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one track and field - javelin coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Club Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Track and Field Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of athletics NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in track and field - javelin, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Pole Vault

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Weighted rope or elastic may be used rather than a crossbar, for practice.

Check crossbars and fiberglass poles for cracks regularly.

Landing Pits:

  • Landing pits must be specific to pole vaulting and be a minimum of 5m (excluding the front pieces) x 5m x 0.8m as specified by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). The front pieces must be at least 2m long.
  • Landing mats must not slide on impact.

Poles:

  • Poles must be approved as specified by the International Athletic Federation (IAAF).
  • Poles must be appropriate to weight of athlete.
  • Bamboo poles must be totally wrapped with tape before using.

Standards:

  • Standard must be secure and vertical.
  • Check standards regularly for damage and repair or replace as needed.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Track spikes as allowed by the International Association of Athletics Federations and competition facility.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Approach must be clear of obstacles, clean and free of puddles and provide safe footing and traction.

Vaulting trough must be solid and free from cracks or splinters.

Front edge of vaulting trough must be flush with runway.

Run-up area markings must prevent other participants from interfering with competitor in progress.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision.

Instructor must be near take off area during practice.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one track and field - pole vault coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Club Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Track and Field Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of athletics NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in track and field - pole vault, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Shot Put

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Shot must be of appropriate size and weight for age and sex of the athlete. Visit Athletics Ontario for recommended weights.

Only shots designed for indoor use can be used in the gym.

Towel/rag to dry shot.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No track spikes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Indoor surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Landing area must be well marked and void of people during activity.

Outside putting circle must provide safe footing and traction.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Establish safe routines for putting and retrieving of shots.

Establish a safe routine for transporting shots to and from the throwing area.

Shots must never be thrown or rolled back to throwing area.

Where a protective screen is not in place, students and spectators must be in a designated area at least 4m (12’) behind the toe-line.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for initial skill instruction.

Following initial skill instruction and after all safety concerns have been emphasized, on site supervision is appropriate.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one track and field - shot put coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Sport Coach Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Club Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Track and Field Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of athletics NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in track and field - shot put, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Steeplechase

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Barriers must be free of splinters, cracks or other hazards.

Where water pits are used, steeplechase barriers must be securely in place.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Practice surfaces must be free of debris and provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Water pit must not be used in practices and competitions unless it is filled with water.

Prior to each use, coach/convener must inspect running area to determine it is safe for use.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required for initial skill instruction.

Following initial skill instruction on-site supervision is required.

On-site supervision is required for set up of barriers.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one track and field - steeplechase coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Club Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Track and Field Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of athletics NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in track and field - steeplechase, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Track Events

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Sprints/400m/800m/1500m/3000m/Relays

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Check batons for cracks or splinters.

Check safety of starting blocks, if they are used.

Starter pistol must be locked away safely when not in use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. 5mm spikes on rubberized or asphalt tracks or 9mm spikes on cinder tracks may be worn. No track shoes with spikes removed or turf shoes permitted. No bare feet or socks without shoes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

All tracks must be inspected annually and maintained as necessary.

Athletes running off-site for practice must use approved route.

Practice surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

“Blacktop” strips and open fields may be used if areas are suitable, smooth, clean, level and safe footing and traction.

Run-out areas must be in place for all running events, school hall and stairway running.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult Appendix G - Safety in Activity Rooms, for safety precautions when using non-gym areas.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Indoor Running – Use of Hallways and Stairs

At turnaround or end points, designate a safety or slow down zone (e.g. using pylons).

Designate a safety zone (e.g. using pylons) for all doors that open out into the hall.

Where school hallways or stairways are used for training purposes, appropriate safety measures must be in place:

  • all classroom doors that open out have to be secured open, flush with hall wall
  • hallway protrusions must be clearly marked
  • inform appropriate staff members of times and location of indoor practices
  • no running to take place where showcases presents a hazard
  • hall double doors have to be secured open
  • monitors must be positioned at corners
  • floor surface must be dry and provide good footing
  • stairways must have a railing
  • students must be instructed on safety procedures for running stairs (e.g. one step at a time, blind spots, spatial awareness, using railings for balance, maintaining body control, respect for personal space)

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

When running above distances in practice, students may be temporarily out of sight and must run in pairs or groups.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental Considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision for sprints and relays.

In-the-area supervision is required for middle distance (400m, 800m and 1500m, 3000m and hallway/stair running.

Constant visual supervision of starter pistol when in use.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Track and Field - Triple Jump/Long Jump

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Rake.

Shovel or spade.

Keep rake, shovel, and spade away from pit and run-up when not in use.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Athletes may wear spikes up to 9mm (.25”) on rubberized, asphalt, grass or gravel surfaces. No track shoes without spikes permitted. No bare feet or socks without shoes permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles and must provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Runway must be free from water puddles.

Pits must be filled with sand in accordance with the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) rules (30 cm/12”).

Determine landing area is well raked and free of foreign objects.

Determine take off area is firm and flat and swept if ‘blacktop’. Boards must be level and firmly attached.

For the long jump, there must be a distance of 1m (3'4") to 3m (10') between take-off board and front edge of pit.

In triple jump determine that the take off areas are at an appropriate distance from the pit to allow for a safe landing on the second phase (step).

Dig pit at least once a season and after heavy rain.

Pits must not be located in high traffic areas or near other activity sites, (e.g., ball diamonds).

Pits must have a minimum width of 2.75m (9’).

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No athlete may participate in a competition without prior skill development and practice.

Refrain from jumping if there are slippery conditions.

Establish a procedure to initiate jumping (e.g., remove a cone from the take-off board when ready).

If athletes are rakers, they must be trained. As part of training, include rules such as:

  • remove rake before next competitor begins approach and hold rake prongs downward
  • begin raking after competitor is out of pit
  • rake sand into the middle as opposed to out to the sides
  • rakes not in use prongs down

Determine that spectators and participants stay back from pit and runway.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision during initial skill instruction.

On-site supervision after skills have been taught.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Triathlon

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Swimming/Running/Cycling
Higher Risk Activity

Consult the Outdoor Education - Swimming page for pond/lake swimming.

The rules of the Highway Traffic Act must be reviewed and followed. This includes group riding protocol.

Lake/pond swims at recreational camps are governed by Health Protection and Promotion Act – Recreational Camp Regulation 503/17.

All pools are governed by the Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565. Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D – Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Athletes must inspect bikes prior to use.

Concerns must be brought to the attention of the coach.

A properly fitted (as per manufacturer's guidelines) and properly worn bicycle helmet certified by a recognized safety standards association (e.g. CSA, CSPC, ASTM, Snell, BSI, AS) must be worn.

Must have accessibility to standard safety equipment as stated in Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. Proper running shoes in good condition must be worn for distance training. No open-toed shoes or sandals are permitted. Swim caps must be worn during swim portion of event.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Running and cycling surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles and must provide safe footing and traction.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Coaches must familiarize students with the route or course before initial attempt (e.g., notice of intersections to approach with caution).

Use school or community pool.

Choose routes carefully, considering the length, road surface, steepness of slopes, frequency of traffic, complexity of intersections and railway crossings.

If using roadways, intersections must be supervised (e.g. adult volunteers, police officers) during competition. If using community roads, police/appropriate officials must be informed.

Map of training routes must be available in school and available for students.

Water temperature must be a minimum of 19 degrees Celsius (66 degrees Fahrenheit). If it's below this temperature, follow the Triathlon Canada Competition Rules or Triathlon Ontario.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Athletes must be aware of emergency procedures.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Modify length of routes and swims to accommodate training and differences in age, ability, physical development.

Athletes must practice transitions between events prior to competition.

A record of athletes running and cycling, and the route they will be travelling, must be left in the school with the appropriate staff.

Training must be done with a partner in all three events.

No audio devices (e.g., MP3 players) must be used.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Swimming

Inform in-charge person of any student with a medical history or any medical problems that may affect the student’s safety in water (for example, diabetes, asthma, heart condition, convulsions, epilepsy, frequent ear infections).

Athletes must be made aware of the value of wearing wetsuits to prevent hypothermia and/or to promote buoyancy.

A means to reach a swimmer in trouble must be accessible (for example, paddle board, motorized boat).

Swim Test for Shallow and Deep Water

An initial screening/testing of swimming ability must be done in shallow water.

Students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a certified aquatic instructor (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Results of the swim test must be documented and communicated as per school board policy (e.g., to the student, teacher, principal, parents/guardians, trip guide(s), lifeguards, aquatic instructor, and outside provider [if applicable]).

Students who do not pass the above swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not compete.

Cycling

Athletes must be made aware of the importance of eye protection in cycling.

A clearly designated bicycle disembarkment area to be in place.

Bicycles must be retrieved from a designated location and returned to the designated location.

Helmets must be placed on head with strap in place prior to mounting the bicycle and taken off only after getting off the bike.

Athletes must demonstrate to the teacher/coach competency in stopping, changing gears, turning, signalling and passing before leaving school property and/or entering competition.

Race Distances

Age Swim Bike Run
12-13 Up to 300m 10km 3km
14-15 Up to 500m 10km 4km
16-19 Up to 750m 20km 5km
18-19 Up to 1.5km 40km 10km

(Adapted from Triathlon Canada, Kids of Steel® and Youth Development - Principles and Rules, 2015, p.5).

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

In-the-area supervision is required for cycling and running.

On-site supervision is required by qualified swim instructors/lifeguards during the swimming portion.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one triathlon coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition Introduction Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Triathlon Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of triathlon NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in triathlon, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test for Shallow and Deep Water

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Lifeguard Qualifications

An individual over the age of 18 (e.g. teacher, instructor, trip guide, volunteer) must have a current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) lifeguard certificate issued by one of the following organizations:

  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard – Pool;
  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard;
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Supervision Ratios for the Swim Test for Shallow and Deep Water

If conducting the swim test at a pool, there must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 aquatic instructors per 50 students, (with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard).

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

Supervision Ratios for Instructional Time

If conducting the swim test at a pool, there must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 aquatic instructors per 50 students, (with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard).

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Tug of War

Secondary - Interschool 2018

This activity page must be presented to the activity provider prior to the activity taking place. The activity provider must meet the minimum requirements listed on this page. For more information on planning trips using outside providers, consult Appendix O - Outside Activity Providers.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the teacher.

Manila Hemp Tug of War rope or equivalent must be used:

  • minimum 32mm (1¼“) in diameter
  • minimum 33m (108’) length

Ropes must be regularly checked for splinters and severe wear.

Stopwatch.

Whistle.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn (e.g., flat-soled athletic shoes). Long-sleeved shirts must be worn.

No cleats, spikes or gloves permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

No indoor facilities can be used for Tug of War. The exception is a commercial Tug of War indoor facility.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the teacher.

The pulling area must be a flat, level surface free of debris and water, provide safe footing and traction, and be well-removed from traffic areas.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Outdoor grass area minimum 8m x 40m (26’ x 131’).

The playing area must be outlined with Tug of War markings.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

When running takes place off school site for a warm, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Refer to individual school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Follow and enforce the rules in the official Tug of War Rule Book.

Maximum number of participants on each team is 8.

When selecting teams, consideration must be given to athletes’ age, weight, height, sex, fitness level and experience.

Athletes must participate in appropriate warm-up, including aerobic warm-up and stretches.

Athletes must be informed to never wrap the rope around waist or wrist or pull it under/through clothing.

No knots or loops are to be made in the rope, nor must it be locked across any part of the body of any team member.

At the start of a pull, the rope must be taut with the centre rope marking over the centre line marking on the ground.

Every pulling member must hold the rope with the palms of both bare hands facing up. The rope will pass between the body and the upper part of the arm.

For the end puller/anchor, the rope passes alongside the body, diagonally across the back and over the opposite shoulder from rear to front. The remaining rope passes under the armpit in a backward and outward direction and the slack runs free. The anchor then grips the standing part of the rope by the ordinary grip (e.g., the palms of both hands facing up, with both arms extended forward.

Inform athletes that there is the potential for rope burns.

To reduce the risk of rope burns:

  • grip the rope only hard enough to stop it from slipping
  • momentarily wiggle fingers without letting go of the rope
  • if arms tire, momentarily squeeze rope under armpit

Participants must be instructed in proper foot positioning and footwork.

Instruction must be given in the likelihood of a fall, and recovery techniques.

Allow teams sufficient time to physically recover after each pull (minimum of 1-2 minutes is required).

Maximum time for each pull is one minute.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision for team tug of war activities.

On-site supervision for initial instruction involving pairs.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Supervision Ratios

1 referee: each pull, 1 coach per 16 athletes

One coach for each pull. The coach acts as the timer and overseer of activity to determine participants in distress and acts accordingly.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Ultimate Disc

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Disc must be inspected for cracks or spurs.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn. No metal cleats permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Indoor surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Outdoor playing area must be inspected regularly for debris and obstructions, provide safe footing and traction as well as be well removed from traffic areas.

For practices: Holes, hazards (e.g. glass, rocks, sprinkler heads, sewer grates), and severely uneven surfaces must be identified. The conditions must be made safe or the activity must be modified or moved to a safe location. Hazards which cannot be removed must be brought to the attention of the athletes. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

For competitions: Where hazardous conditions that cannot be avoided are identified by the coach and/or officials the conditions must be made safe or the competition must be cancelled or moved to a safe location. Coach must notify principal/designate of unsafe field conditions.

Goal posts must be padded if in field of play.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Any exposed orthopedic apparatus, which presents a safety concern to other players, must be soft or padded.

Any player with a playing cast must provide a doctor’s note or parent/guardian signed permission indicating it is safe for them to play.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

No intentional body contact permitted.

The number of games played in one day must not present a safety concern.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).

Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Volleyball

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Poles must be safely stored when not in use.

Nets must have no frayed wires.

Protective padding must be placed around the poles (including cranks and supports, extending from the floor up to the bottom of the net) as well as referee stand and, where appropriate, scorer’s table.

Antennae must be flush with the bottom of the net.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction.

When volleyball poles are removed, floor plugs must be replaced.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm up, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Drills must be organized so as to minimize the risk of being hit with an errant ball.

Athletes must be instructed in the safe and correct method of setting up, adjusting and taking down nets (e.g., standing on a chair).

When facilities do not allow for safe play, (e.g., poles on sidelines, lines adjacent to walls) modify rules appropriately.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision during initial instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

On-site supervision during equipment set up and take down.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations where applicable.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Volleyball - Beach

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Poles must be safely stored when not in use.

Nets must have no frayed wires.

Ball must be appropriate for age and ability of athletes.

For portable systems with guide ropes, clearly identify ropes with markers (e.g., tape, pylons).

Protective padding must be placed around the poles including cranks and cover from the ground up to the bottom of the net or activities must be modified.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

No bare feet on sand courts unless playing area has been raked and inspected prior to use.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Playing surface and surrounding areas must be free of obstacles and provide safe footing and traction.

Beach volleyball courts must have sufficient depth of sand so that there are not bare or hard dirt surfaces.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm up, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Drills must be organized so as to minimize the risk of being hit with an errant ball.

Athletes must be instructed in the safe and correct method of setting up and taking down of nets (e.g., standing on a chair).

If using antennae, the bottom must be flush with the net.

When poles are not padded activities must be modified so that poles do not present a safety hazard.

Athletes must be made aware of boundary ropes if used.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Environmental considerations

When environmental conditions may pose a risk to student safety (e.g. thunderstorms [lightning] or student(s) with asthma, triggered by air quality), teachers must take into consideration their school board/school’s protocols and procedures related to:

  • environmental conditions (consult Appendices F-1 to F-6: Lightning Protocol, Sample Air Quality Index, Sample Temperature, Tornado, Ultra Violet Index, and Wind Velocity Preparedness Guides]); and
  • insects (e.g., mosquitoes and ticks [consult the school/school board’s protocols and/or regional Public Health Department’s website]).
  • Students must receive instruction on safety procedures related to environmental conditions and be made aware of ways to protect themselves (e.g. sun burn, heat stroke).

At all times the school board’s weather and insect procedures are the minimum standards. In situations where a higher standard of care is presented (e.g., outside activity providers, facility/program coordinators), the higher standard of care must be followed.

Supervision

On-site supervision during initial instruction of skills.

In-the-area supervision after skills have been taught.

On-site supervision during equipment set-up and take-down.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations where applicable.

First Aid

An individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes through the entirety of a practice and/or competition must follow the school board’s concussion protocol and the school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response).

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Water Polo

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Also consult the Secondary Curricular Swimming – Synchronized Swimming page.

All pools are governed by the Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565. Sections of this regulation have been highlighted, as they are of the utmost importance for the safety of students as they participate in swimming programs.

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D – Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Standard safety equipment as stated in pool regulations (e.g., ring buoys, reaching poles, spinal boards, etc.).

Must have accessibility to standard safety equipment as stated in Ontario Public Pools Regulation 565.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate swimwear and footwear must be worn. Water polo caps with protective ear cups. Device to keep hair from obstructing vision (e.g., elastic).

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

Long hair must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Backyard pools must not be used.

School or community swimming pool.

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Pool deck must be kept clear of obstacles and excess water.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Inform referee of any athletes having any medical problems that may affect their safety in the water.

Coach/Teacher Supervisor must inform in-charge person on deck of any athlete with a medical history (e.g., diabetes, asthma, frequent ear infections) or any medical conditions that may affect the student’s safety in the water.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Fingernails must be closely trimmed.

Water polo instructional swim may include organized games (for example, relays) but cannot include an unorganized free swim.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Swim Test for Water Activities

Prior to participating in water polo, students must successfully complete the following swim test in its entirety:

  • rolling entry (backwards or forward) into deep water at 2.75m (9’) minimum depth
  • tread water for 1 minute
  • swim 50m (164’) continuously any stroke

The components of the swim test must be completed in sequence and without any aids or stops.

The test must be administered by a certified aquatic instructor (test is based on the Lifesaving Society’s Swim to Survive™ Standard).

The swim test must be completed within the school year in which the activity is taking place.

In lieu of completing the swim test, students may provide proof of Bronze Medallion certification or higher.

Results of the swim test must be documented and communicated as per school board policy (e.g., to the student, teacher, principal, parents/guardians, trip guide(s), lifeguards, aquatic instructor, and outside provider [if applicable]).

Students who do not pass the swim test or who do not have the aforementioned certification must not participate in Water Polo.

Supervision

Constant visual supervision is required.

Ratio of certified lifeguard to athlete: 2 lifeguards per 1-50 athletes.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one water polo coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Community Sport Coach – Community Club Coach Course (formerly “I Love Water Polo”)
  • NCCP Competition Coach – The Practice Coach Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Water Polo Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of water polo NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in water polo, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications for the Swim Test for Water Activities

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Aquatic Instructor Qualifications for the Instructional Time

Aquatic instructors must hold one current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) aquatic instructor certificate and one current assistant lifeguard or lifeguard certificate. If the aquatic instructor does not hold a lifeguard certificate or an assistant lifeguard certificate, a certified lifeguard must also be on deck during the aquatic instruction and/or swim test.

Aquatic Instructor Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Water Safety Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Instructor Certificate
  • Lifesaving Society - Swim Instructor Certificate
  • YMCA - Instructor Certificate
  • Ontario Teachers Aquatic Standard (OTAS) - for pool situations only

Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard - Pool
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Assistant Lifeguard Certificates:

  • Canadian Red Cross - Assistant Lifeguard
  • Lifesaving Society - Bronze Cross
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care

Lifeguard Qualifications

An individual over the age of 18 (e.g. teacher, instructor, trip guide, volunteer) must have a current (to be current, the date on the certificate must not be older than two years) lifeguard certificate issued by one of the following organizations:

  • Lifesaving Society - National Lifeguard – Pool;
  • Canadian Red Cross - Pool Lifeguard;
  • Equivalent certificate approved by Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Supervision Ratios for the Swim Test for Water Activities

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

Supervision Ratios for Instructional Time

There must be a minimum of two certified aquatic instructors on deck or in the pool.

Supervision ratio is 2 certified aquatic instructors per 50 students, with both instructors also certified as lifeguards or one lifeguard and one assistant lifeguard.

In situations where there are 51-75 students, an additional certified aquatic instructor is required.

If assistant lifeguards are used, the number of assistant lifeguards may never exceed the number of lifeguards on deck.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Weightlifting/Olympic Weightlifting

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible.

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

All equipment must be checked before use and repaired as necessary.

Students may use personal audio devices with headphones after initial instruction on any equipment that does not require a spotter or ongoing instruction. The personal audio device must not pose a safety hazard (e.g., headphone cord length).

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing and footwear must be worn.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Fundamentals of Safety when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables, chairs), and must provide safe footing and traction.

Weight room must be locked when unsupervised.

Weights must not slide or slip on floor surface.

Adequate storage for free weight plates must be in place.

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm up, conditioning run and/or is an integral part of the activity:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Skills and procedures must be reviewed regularly.

All athletes must be instructed in the proper lifting techniques and safety procedures (e.g., spotting).

Free weight plates must be secured in place before using.

Stress correct body alignment for injury prevention.

A system of safety spotting must be in place.

A process must be developed to regularly disinfect equipment.

A minimum of 2 athletes must be in the fitness room at any given time.

Where weight training activities constitute the main part of the work out, a proper warm up and cool down must be done.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required for use of free weights and weight machines.

Constant visual supervision is required during initial instruction and practice of lifts.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations where applicable.

At least one weightlifting/olympic weightlifting coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Instruction Coach – Instructor-Beginner Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition-Introduction Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Weightlifting Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of weightlifting NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in weightlifting/olympic weightlifting, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.

Wrestling

Secondary - Interschool 2018

Higher Risk Activity

Equipment

A fully stocked first aid kit must be readily accessible. (Consult Appendix D - Sample First Aid Kit)

A working communication device (e.g., cell phone) must be accessible.

Determine that all equipment is safe for use (e.g., no sharp edges, sharp corners, cracks, or splinters). Students must be encouraged to report equipment problems to the coach.

Wrestling mats being used need to be mats manufactured and approved by the manufacturer for wrestling, and be in good repair.

Determine that mats are not damaged to the point where the mat is compromised (e.g. large pieces of foam missing).

Utility or add-a-mat systems may be used for practices only. Determine that mats and joining systems are in good condition. Mats must be attached together or aligned so separation does not occur.

Wrestlers with orthodontic devices must wear appropriate mouth protection.

Clothing/Footwear/Jewellery

Appropriate clothing must be worn. Wrestling uniforms consistent with current rules must be worn.

Wrestling shoes or appropriate footwear (no sharp edges, lace tips on shoes). No bare feet permitted.

No glasses permitted.

The wearing of jewellery during practices and competitions must meet the rules of the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA, and local athletic association. Consult the Generic Section when jewellery is not addressed by the governing body of the sport/activity, OFSAA or the local athletic association.

When long hair poses a safety risk it must be secured. Devices (e.g. hair pins, clips and barrettes) used to tie back long hair must not present a safety concern.

Facilities

Determine that all facilities are safe for use. Students must be encouraged to report facility problems to the coach.

Mat surface and surrounding area must be free of all obstacles (e.g., tables chairs) and must provide safe footing and traction.

Mat surfaces must be checked regularly for irregularities and be cleaned prior to use.

Allow suitable clearance from the edge of wrestling area to surrounding walls.

Turning points, finish lines, end zones, and boundaries must be a safe distance away from walls, stages, equipment, trees, posts, natural hazards, and holes. Walls, stages, equipment, trees and posts must not be used as turning points, finish lines, end zones or boundaries. A marker (e.g. line or pylon) must be designated and be properly identified.

Surrounding walls must be padded if clearance from mat surface is less than 2m (6’6”).

Consult the Fundamentals of Safety for the opening and closing of gymnasium divider doors/curtains.

When running takes place off school site for a warm-up or conditioning run:

  • Coaches must do a safety check ‘walk through’ in order to identify potential problems prior to initial use of route or course.
  • Coaches must outline to the students the route or course (e.g., notice of areas to approach with caution) before the start of the run.
  • Coaches must determine that students are not crossing busy intersections unless directly supervised.

Special Rules/Instructions

Be aware of students whose medical condition (e.g., asthma, anaphylaxis, casts, previous concussion, orthopaedic device) may affect participation. (Consult Fundamentals of Safety)

Students must not participate in the activity until they receive information on concussion prevention specific to the activity, inherent risks of the activity (e.g. outline possible risks and ways to minimize the risks), and procedures and rules for safe play. Students must receive instruction on the importance of reporting symptoms related to a suspected concussion.

Refer to the school board’s transportation procedures related to communicating with parents/guardians the location of an off-site activity and the means of transportation used as well as to the need for obtaining parent/guardian permission.

Previous training, fitness level and the length of time and intensity of physical activity must be taken into consideration.

The activities must be based on skills that are taught.

The skills must be taught in proper progression.

A proper warm-up and cool-down must be included.

Fair play and rules of the sport must be taught and strictly enforced.

Athletes must wrestle with partners of similar weight, strength and ability.

Maximum time limit of 3 minutes per round.

Match length may be shortened if desired.

There must be a minimum of 15 minutes between matches.

Ground or ‘par terre’ and standing wrestling permitted.

Throwing permitted only when break fall/roll techniques have been well established.

Athletes may referee under the supervision of the coach in practice. Only trained and certified officials for competition.

Warm up activities must emphasize conditioning and flexibility.

Fingernails must be closely trimmed.

Benefits of headgear must be outlined to student athletes.

The hazards of improper eating practices and severe weight loss techniques must be outlined to athletes.

Adequate liquid replacement (personal water bottles, water fountains) must be accessible for students before, during and after physical activity to prevent dehydration.

Supervision

On-site supervision is required.

Constant visual supervision is required during initial instruction of techniques for holds and releases.

Students must be informed that the use of equipment and the gymnasium are prohibited without supervision. In addition to verbal communication, the doors must be locked or signs must be posted indicating that students are not allowed to use the gym unless appropriately supervised.

Coaching Qualifications

The head coach must demonstrate knowledge of the sport, skills and strategies to the principal or designate.

All coaches must be familiar with and implement where applicable the criteria outlined in Appendix P – Coaching Expectations.

At least one wrestling coach must possess one of the following coaching qualifications:

  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition-Introduction Part 1 Course
  • NCCP Competition Coach – Competition-Introduction Part 2 Course
  • Accreditation as a NCCP Wrestling Learning Facilitator
  • Completion of wrestling NCCP level 1 and/or level 2 certification in the past
  • Attendance at a clinic or workshop within the last three years provided by an instructor who is knowledgeable of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions), and where safety is addressed as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.
  • Past experience within the last 3 years as a coach in wrestling, having knowledge of the activity (e.g., appropriate skills and progressions) and current safety practices as outlined in the Ontario Physical Education Safety Guidelines.

For more information on sport-specific NCCP training please visit coach.ca.

Coaching resources can be found at Ontario Amateur Wrestling Association.

First Aid

The individual who takes responsibility for providing first aid to injured athletes must:

  • as a minimum, have a current first aid certification from a recognized first aid provider (e.g., St. John Ambulance , Red Cross) that includes CPR B or C and training in head, neck and spinal injury management;
  • be in the area and readily accessible during the entire practice/competition;
  • follow their school’s First Aid Emergency Response (consult Appendix E - Sample First Aid Plan and Sample First Aid Emergency Response);
  • follow their school board's concussion protocol for a suspected concussion; and
  • not be a participant in the activity.

Universal precautions (e.g., using impermeable gloves, consult Appendix K - Universal Precautions – Blood and Bodily Fluids) must be followed when dealing with situations involving blood and other bodily fluids.

Also see Fundamentals of Safety section to view complete safety requirements.